Appendix 2

Findings of the 2013 NCAS on attitudes towards violence against women

Findings of the 2013 NCAS on attitudes towards violence against women

1995

2009

2013

Circumstances in which violence towards a current/former partner can be justified (% agree)

Partner admits to sex with another man

6

5

6

Partner makes him look stupid or insults him in front of his friends

n/a

3

5**

Partner ends or tries to end relationship

n/a

3

4

Against ex-partner to get access to children

n/a

4

4

If ex-partner is unreasonable about property settlement and financial issues

n/a

2

4**

Attitudes excusing violence (% agree)

Rape results from men not able to control their need for sex

n/a

35

43**

A man is less responsible for rape if drunk/affect by drugs at the time

n/a

8

9

Domestic violence can be excused if people get so angry they lost control

n/a

20

22

Domestic violence can be excused if the violent person regrets it

n/a

25

21**

Domestic violence can be excused if the violent person was abused as a child

n/a

n/a

12

Domestic violence can be excused if the violent person is under a lot of stress

n/a

n/a

12

Domestic violence can be excused if the offender is heavily affected by alcohol

n/a

8

9

Attitudes trivialising violence (% agree)

Where one partner is violent it's reasonable for them to be made to leave the family home

n/a

90

89

It's hard to understand why women stay

77

82

78**

Most women could leave a violence relationship if they really wanted to

n/a

54

51

Women who are sexually harassed should sort it out themselves

20

13

12#

Domestic violence is a private matter to be handled in the family

18

14

17**

It's a women's duty to stay in a violent relationship to keep the family together

n/a

8

9

Attitudes minimising violence

Violence against women is a serious issue

n/a

96

95

Certain behaviours are serious (% agree)

Slaps/pushes to cause harm/fear

93

92

92

Forces partner to have sex

95

96

96

Tries to scare/control by threatening to hurt others

n/a

97

97

Throws/smashes objects to frighten/threaten

87

94

93#

Repeated criticises to make partner feel bad/useless

72

84

85#

Controls social life by preventing partner seeing family and friends

84

85

87#

Tries to control by denying partner money

77

75

74#

Yells abuse at partner

70

79

n/a

Stalking by repeatedly following/watching at home or work

n/a

96

94

Harassment by repeated phone calls

n/a

92

90

Harassment by repeated emails, text messages

n/a

86

86

Seriousness/acceptability of tracking a female partner by electronic means without their consent (% agree)

Serious

n/a

n/a

85

Never acceptable

n/a

n/a

61

Attitudes towards false allegations of partner violence and rape (% agree)

Women going through custody battles often make up or exaggerate claims of domestic violence in order to improve their case

n/a

51

53

Women rarely make false claims of rape

59

60

59

A lot of times women who say they were raped led the man on and later had regrets

n/a

n/a

38

If a woman doesn't physically resist – even if protesting verbally – then it isn't really rape

n/a

n/a

10

Attitudes shifting blame from perpetrator to victim (% agree)

If a woman is raped while drunk/ affect by drugs she is at least partly responsible

n/a

18

19

Women often say 'no' when they mean 'yes'

18

14

16

If a woman goes to a room alone with a man at a party, it is her fault if she is raped

n/a

n/a

12

Domestic violence can be excused if the victim is heavily affected by alcohol

n/a

9

11

Table: 2013 NCAS findings on attitudes towards violence against women.[1]

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