Footnotes

Footnotes

Chapter 1 - Introduction

[1]        Senate Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Bills, Alert Digest No. 3 of 2015, 18 March 2015, p. 17. The Scrutiny of Bills Committee noted that it considered a similar bill in 2014. At that time, the Scrutiny of Bills Committee commented on subclause 9(3) of the earlier bill, which provided that the defendant would bear an evidential burden of proof regarding the existence of prior written authorisation. The Scrutiny of Bills Committee noted the explanation provided to the effect that the matter 'may be said to be peculiarly within the knowledge of the defendant'. In the circumstances, the Scrutiny of Bills Committee did not make any further comment on this matter. See Alert Digest No. 1 of 2014, 12 February 2014, p. 9.

[2]        Geoscience Australia and Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics, Australian Energy Resource Assessment, second edition, 2014, p. 127.

[3]        Geoscience Australia and Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics, Australian Energy Resource Assessment, second edition, 2014, p. 128.

[4]        Geoscience Australia, 'Unconventional Petroleum Resources', www.ga.gov.au/scientific-topics/energy/resources/petroleum-resources/unconventional-resources (accessed 29 April 2015).

[5]        CSG is a natural gas extracted from coal seams at depths of 300–1000 metres. CSG is a mixture of a number of gases, but generally contains 95–97 per cent pure methane (this distinguishes CSG from conventional natural gas, which is typically 90 per cent methane). Shale gas is 'mainly methane trapped within shale rock layers at depths greater than about 1500 metres'. CSIRO, 'What is unconventional gas?', www.csiro.au/en/Research/Energy/Hydraulic-fracturing/What-is-unconventional-gas (accessed 29 April 2015). Tight gas is found within low permeability reservoir rocks. Geoscience Australia explains that tight gas 'can be regionally distributed (for example, basin-centred gas), rather than accumulated in a readily producible reservoir in a discrete structural closure as in a conventional gas field'. Geoscience Australia, 'Unconventional Petroleum Resources'.

[6]        Queensland Government, Submission 87, p. 1; Susan Robertson, 'Unconventional gas: legal issues', AMPLA Yearbook, 2012, p. 312.

[7]        Department of Industry and Science, Australian Energy Update 2015, p. 19.

[8]        Queensland Government, Submission 87, p. 1.

[9]        Queensland Government, Submission 87, p. 5.

[10]      Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics, Energy in Australia 2014, p. 17; Santos, 'Santos announces start of Australia's first commercial shale gas production', Media release, 19 October 2012, www.santos.com/Archive/NewsDetail.aspx?id=1347 (accessed 1 September 2015).

[11]      Geoscience Australia, 'Unconventional Petroleum Resources'.

[12]      Department of Industry and Science, Resources and Energy Quarterly, March 2015, www.industry.gov.au/industry/Office-of-the-Chief-Economist/Publications/Documents/req/‌REQ-March15.pdf (accessed 29 April 2015), p. 66.

[13]      CSIRO, 'What is hydraulic fracturing?', www.csiro.au/en/Research/Energy/Hydraulic-fracturing/a-What-is-hydraulic-fracturing (accessed 1 May 2015).

[14]      CSIRO, 'What is hydraulic fracturing?'.

[15]      Queensland Government, Submission 87, p. 5.

[16]      CSIRO, 'What is hydraulic fracturing?'.

[17]      CSIRO, 'What is hydraulic fracturing?'.

[18]      Constitutional corporations are defined in the bill as a corporation to which paragraph 51(xx) of the Constitution applies (clause 4 of the bill). This includes foreign corporations, and trading or financial corporations formed within the limits of the Commonwealth. Part 4 of the bill includes arrangements that address joint ventures or partnerships consisting of two or more constitutional corporations.

[19]      Clause 4.

[20]      Clause 5 provides that a person is considered to have an ownership interest in land if the person 'has a legal or equitable interest in it or a right to occupy it'. However, a person does not have an ownership interest in land if the interest or right 'arises as a result of a right granted under a law of the Commonwealth, a State or a Territory to engage in gas or coal mining activities'. In her second reading speech, Senator Waters referred to farmers, graziers, residents, local councils and native title holders as landholders targeted by the bill. See Senator Larissa Waters, Senate Hansard, 4 March 2015, p. 1170.

[21]      Subclause 10(1).

[22]      Subclause 12(2).

[23]      Subclause 12(3).

[24]      Clauses 2, 9(1). The explanatory memorandum notes that the intention is that prior written authorisation must be secured prior to any new activities commencing, not activities already being undertaken. The following example is provided: '...if a corporation has already started exploring for gas or coal on particular land before the Act commences, authorisation to continue that activity after commencement will not be required. Authorisation will be required, however, if the corporation wishes to engage in activities for the purpose of producing gas or coal on that land after commencement'. Explanatory Memorandum, pp. 1–2.

[25]      From 31 July 2015, section 4AA of the Crimes Act 1914 provides that one penalty unit equals $180. The penalty unit will be indexed every three years to the consumer price index, effective from 1 July 2018.

[26]      Subclause 10(2).

[27]      Senator Larissa Waters, Senate Hansard, 4 March 2015, p. 1171.

[28]      Subclause 19(1).

[29]      Subclause 19(2).

[30]      Subclauses 15(6) and (7).

[31]      Subclauses 15(6) and (7).

Chapter 2 - Regulation of coal and onshore gas activities

[1]        No Fracking WAy, Submission 15, p. 3.

[2]        Mr Leslie Manning of p&e Law explained that he has clients who 'had to go and re-identify all of their breeding stock because gates have been left open and cattle have intermingled'. Mr Neil Cameron of the Basin Sustainability Alliance added that: '...not only were gates that had been closed sometimes left open, you also had the other dangerous situation where a gate that had been deliberately left open so stock could access water for their survival was shut'. Mr Leslie Manning, Director, p&e Law, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 41; Mr Neil Cameron, Committee Member, Basin Sustainability Alliance, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 20.

[3]        For example, see Mr George Bender, Spokesperson, Hopeland Community Sustainability Group, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, pp. 23–24.

[4]        See Mr Leslie Manning, p&e Law, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 39; Mrs Pan Bender, Spokesperson, Hopeland Community Sustainability Group, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 28.

[5]        No Fracking WAy, Submission 15, p. 5.

[6]        Ms Heather Gibbons, Submission 13, pp. 16–17; Livestock SA, Submission 20, p. 2; Ms Leanne Emery, Submission 51, p. 6.

[7]        For example, the committee was informed of a case where a dam of produced water from CSG activities burst, resulting in water flowing across neighbouring properties and beyond. The witness observed that the landholder in question could not manage this risk effectively as they cannot insure against this risk and was not in a position to take legal action against the state government, gas company or neighbour. Mr Phil Laird, National Coordinator, Lock the Gate Alliance, Proof Committee Hansard, 25 August 2015, p. 8. For other examples, see People for the Plains, Submission 50, p. 3 and Ms Sarah Ciesiolka, Submission 52, p. 2.

[8]        Mrs Sally Hunter, President, People for the Plains, Proof Committee Hansard, 25 August 2015, p. 18.

[9]        Limestone Coast Protection Alliance (LCPA), Submission 91, p. 229. The LCPA cited the following report by the New York State Department of Health: A Public Health Review of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing for Shale Gas Development, December 2014.

[10]      The committee was also informed of international medical studies that analysed hospital admissions and indicated that hospitalisations for heart conditions and neurological illnesses were higher among people who live near unconventional oil and gas extraction activities. See Dr Geralyn McCarron, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 56.

[11]      QGC provided a list of studies undertaken in Queensland. See QGC, Submission 22, p. 4.

[12]      No Fracking WAy, Submission 15, p. 2.

[13]      Livestock SA, Submission 20, p. 2.

[14]      No Fracking WAy, Submission 15, p. 7. However, the CSIRO provided evidence about the risk of barrier failure and how strong regulatory regimes can reduce this risk. See Professor Damian Barrett, Research Director, Energy, CSIRO, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 35.

[15]      Professor Samantha Hepburn, Submission 86, p. 3.

[16]      Ms Galloway noted that the bill uses the term 'legal or equitable interests' in land, which is likely to cover all of these freehold interests. Ms Kate Galloway, Submission 10, p. 1.

[17]      Ms Kate Galloway, Submission 10, p. 2.

[18]      Professor Samantha Hepburn, Submission 86, p. 2.

[19]      Professor Samantha Hepburn, Submission 86, p. 2.

[20]      Professor Samantha Hepburn, Submission 86, pp. 4–5.

[21]      Ms Kate Galloway, Submission 10, p. 2.

[22]      Ms Kate Galloway, Submission 10, pp. 2–3.

[23]      Mr David and Ms Leah McDonnell, Submission 2, p. 1.

[24]      Mr Ken Grundy, Submission 6, p. 1.

[25]      South Australian Chamber of Mines and Energy (SACOME), Submission 23, p. 3.

[26]      Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association (APPEA), Submission 21, p. 5.

[27]      Water Act 2000 (Qld), chapter 3, part 5.

[28]      Dr Emma Carmody, Policy and Law Reform Solicitor, Environmental Defenders Office New South Wales (EDO NSW), Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 4.

[29]      Dr Emma Carmody, EDO NSW, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 5.

[30]      Petroleum and Geothermal Energy Resources Act 1967 (WA), s. 16.

[31]      Professor Hepburn explained that the relevant statute sets out that the holder of a petroleum title shall not enter the land for the purpose of exploration or recovery of petroleum or geothermal energy resources unless the consent in writing of the owner has first been obtained. This is only applicable, however, to private land not exceeding 2000 m2 or, land used as a cemetery or burial place or, land less than 150 metres from a cemetery, burial place, reservoir or substantial improvement (which is to be determined at the Minister's discretion)'. Professor Samantha Hepburn, Submission 86, p. 6.

[32]      Ms Danica Leys, Policy Director, Environment, New South Wales Farmers Association, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 24.

[33]      Mr Charlie Thomas, General Manager, Agribusiness and Rural Affairs, National Farmers' Federation (NFF), Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 24.

[34]      Mr Leslie Manning, Director, p&e Law, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 38.

[35]      Mr Leslie Manning, Director, p&e Law, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 38.

[36]      Mr George Bender, Hopeland Community Sustainability Group, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 23.

[37]      Ms Laura Hogarth, Solicitor, Creevey Russell Lawyers, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 46.

[38]      Mr Charlie Thomas, NFF, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 22.

[39]      Mr Drew Hutton, President, Lock the Gate Alliance, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 9.

[40]      Miss Lynette Nicholson, Chairperson, Basin Sustainability Alliance, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 17.

[41]      Mr Rick Wilkinson, Chief Technical Officer, APPEA, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 52.

[42]      Mr Rick Wilkinson, APPEA, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 52.

[43]      Mr Ian Thompson, First Assistant Secretary, Sustainability and Biosecurity Policy Division, Department of Agriculture, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 17.

[44]      Department of Industry and Science, Submission 31, pp. 2–3.

[45]      Mr Dean Knudson, First Assistant Secretary, Environment Standards Division, Department of the Environment, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 2.

[46]      Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, ss. 75–77A.

[47]      The other matters of national environmental significance are: world heritage properties; national heritage places; wetlands of international importance (listed under the Ramsar Convention); listed threatened species and ecological communities; migratory species protected under international agreements; Commonwealth marine areas; the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park; and nuclear actions (including uranium mines). Department of the Environment, What is protected under the EPBC Act?, www.environment.gov.au/epbc/what-is-protected (accessed 21 July 2015).

[48]      Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, s. 24D.

[49]      Mr Dean Knudson, Department of the Environment, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 1.

[50]      Mr Dean Knudson, Department of the Environment, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 1.

[51]      The Minister for Industry and Science, currently the Hon Ian Macfarlane MP, chairs the COAG Energy Council.

[52]      Ms Margaret Sewell, Head of Division, Energy, Department of Industry and Science, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 13.

[53]      Department of Industry and Science, Domestic gas strategy, 2015, p. 1.

[54]      Department of Industry and Science, Domestic gas strategy, 2015, p. 1.

[55]      Department of Industry and Science, Domestic gas strategy, 2015, p. 2.

[56]      Officers of the Department of Industry and Science provided an overview of these frameworks and how they were being implemented in various jurisdictions. See Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, pp. 14, 19 and 20.

[57]      Ms Margaret Sewell, Department of Industry and Science, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 13.

Chapter 3 - Key issues

[1]        Mrs Shay Dougall, Spokesperson and Founder, Hopeland Community Sustainability Group, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 22.

[2]        Mr Drew Hutton, President, Lock the Gate Alliance, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 9.

[3]        EDOs of Australia, Submission 33, p. 3.

[4]        EDOs of Australia, Submission 33, p. 2.

[5]        Mr Charlie Thomas, General Manager, Agribusiness and Rural Affairs, National Farmers' Federation (NFF), Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 22.

[6]        Mr Charlie Thomas, NFF, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 22.

[7]        Mr Charlie Thomas, NFF, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 29.

[8]        Mr Charlie Thomas, NFF, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 22.

[9]        Mr Leslie Manning, Director, p&e Law, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 42.

[10]      Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association (APPEA), Submission 21, p. 1.

[11]      Ms Kate Galloway, Submission 10, pp. 2–3.

[12]      Ms Kate Galloway, Submission 10, p. 3.

[13]      p&e Law, Submission 24, p. 2.

[14]      APPEA, Submission 21, p. 1. APPEA noted that 'over 4,700 landholder access agreements have been successfully negotiated in Queensland alone'.

[15]      AGL Energy, Submission 25, p. 1. Similarly, WAFarmers advised that it, VegetablesWA and APPEA are in the process of finalising a Land Access Agreement. See Submission 29, p. 2.

[16]      AGL Energy, Submission 25, p. 1.

[17]      Professor Samantha Hepburn, Submission 86, p. 10.

[18]      Professor Samantha Hepburn, Submission 86, p. 11.

[19]      Mr Charlie Thomas, NFF, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 22.

[20]      Subclause 5(1).

[21]      The MCA considered the definition could include: holders of freehold land, holders of Crown leasehold, a beneficiary's interest in land under a fixed trust, the interest a purchaser has after a valid contract of sale of land is entered into but before the land is transferred, mortgagees of property, an easement which is agreed in a registrable form but is not registered, an interest in land where an errant fiduciary purchases property with money obtained in breach of their fiduciary obligation, and situations where a person contributes to the purchase of land and are not a registered proprietor, as equity will recognise their interest in the form of a constructive trust. Minerals Council of Australia, Submission 41, pp. 5–6.

[22]      Minerals Council of Australia, Submission 41, p. 6.

[23]      Minerals Council of Australia, Submission 41, p. 6.

[24]      Minerals Council of Australia, Submission 41, p. 6.

[25]      Minerals Council of Australia, Submission 41, p. 6.

[26]      Ms Kirsten Livermore, Acting Director, Health, Safety, Environment and Communities, Minerals Council of Australia, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 43.

[27]      Creevey Russell Lawyers, Submission 18, p. 2.

[28]      Creevey Russell Lawyers, Submission 18, p. 2.

[29]      Mr Charlie Thomas, NFF, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 22.

[30]      Latrobe Valley Sustainability Group, Submission 36, p. 2.

[31]      Ms Kate Galloway, Submission 10, pp. 1–2.

[32]      Ms Kate Galloway, Submission 10, pp. 1–2.

[33]      QGC, Submission 22, p. 3.

[34]      Subclause 12(2).

[35]      Mr Drew Hutton, Lock the Gate Alliance, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 9.

[36]      Dr Matthew Currell, Submission 11, p. 2.

[37]      Dr Currell suggested the bill could stipulate 'some minimum requirements of the groundwater assessment, which include drilling an adequate number of groundwater monitoring wells and collecting data from these for a baseline period prior to any further activity being conducted'. Dr Matthew Currell, Submission 11, p. 2.

[38]      Dr Currell stated that surface water 'can frequently be put at risk during coal and gas mining' and 'is typically in connection with groundwater and interacts with it extensively'. Dr Matthew Currell, Submission 11, p. 1.

[39]      Mr Dean Knudson, First Assistant Secretary, Environment Standards Division, Department of the Environment, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 10.

[40]      EDOs of Australia, Submission 33, p. 9.

[41]      The committee was informed that bans or moratoriums are in place in certain European countries (Bulgaria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Scotland and Wales and in parts of Spain and Switzerland), in parts of Canada (Quebec, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland), and in parts of the United States of America (New York State, Vermont and Washington DC, and parts of California, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii and Texas). NSW Young Lawyers, Submission 32, p. 3.

[42]      Dr Emma Carmody, Policy and Law Reform Solicitor, Environmental Defenders Office New South Wales (EDO NSW), Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 7.

[43]      Dr Matthew Currell, Submission 11, p. 2. Dr Currell listed examples of problematic instances of the treatment and disposal of flow-back water: see Submission 11, p. 8.

[44]      Dr Matthew Currell, Submission 11, p. 1.

[45]      See Mrs Allison Wharley, Submission 9, p. 2; Livestock SA, Submission 20, p. 3.

[46]      EDOs of Australia, Submission 33, p. 9.

[47]      NSW Young Lawyers, Submission 32, p. 3.

[48]      Mr Drew Hutton, Lock the Gate Alliance, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 10.

[49]      EDOs of Australia, Submission 33, p. 8.

[50]      Dr Emma Carmody, EDO NSW, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, pp. 5–6.

[51]      Department of Industry and Science, Submission 31, p. 5. See also APPEA, Submission 21, p. 10; South Australian Chamber of Mines and Energy (SACOME), Submission 23, p. 4.

[52]      Department of Industry and Science, Submission 31, p. 5.

[53]      Department of Agriculture, Submission 26, p. 3.

[54]      Mr Ian Thompson, First Assistant Secretary, Sustainability and Biosecurity Policy Division, Department of Agriculture, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, pp. 18–19.

[55]      Department of Industry and Science, Submission 31, p. 5.

[56]      For example, WAFarmers submitted 'there is a significant volume of misinformation used to manipulate public perception. This information is usually based on the hydraulic fracturing processes or historical information from [the] USA, with no relevance to Australia, or Western Australia'. WAFarmers, Submission 29, p. 1.

[57]      APPEA, Submission 21, p. 3.

[58]      Petroleum Exploration Society of Australia, Submission 30, p. 6.

[59]      Northern Territory Department of Mines and Energy, Submission 16, p. 2.

[60]      New South Wales Chief Scientist & Engineer, Final Report of the Independent Review of Coal Seam Gas Activities in NSW, September 2014, pp. 9–11; cited in APPEA, Submission 21, p. 13.

[61]      EDOs of Australia, Submission 33, p. 2.

[62]      Lock the Gate Alliance, Submission 19, p. 1.

[63]      Lock the Gate Alliance, Submission 19, p. 2.

[64]      Professor Samantha Hepburn, Submission 86, p. 7.

[65]      Professor Samantha Hepburn, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 38.

[66]      Northern Territory Department of Mines and Energy, Submission 16, p. 1.

[67]      APPEA, Submission 21, p. 1.

[68]      Department of Agriculture, Submission 26, p. 1.

[69]      Department of Agriculture, Submission 26, p. 1.

[70]      South Australian Government, Submission 88, p. 3.

[71]      Mr Charlie Thomas, NFF, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 22.

[72]      QGC, Submission 22, p. 2. See also NFF, Submission 28, p. 1; South Australian Government, Submission 88, p. 3.

[73]      APPEA, Submission 21, p. 2.

[74]      QGC, Submission 22, p. 2.

[75]      QGC, Submission 22, p. 2.

[76]      QGC, Submission 22, p. 2.

[77]      Northern Territory Department of Mines and Energy, Submission 16, p. 1.

[78]      SACOME, Submission 23, p. 2; Department of Industry and Science, Submission 31, p. 1.

[79]      SACOME, Submission 23, p. 2.

[80]      Mr Charlie Thomas, NFF, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 23.

[81]      See Clauses 4 and 14.

[82]      SACOME, Submission 23, p. 2.

[83]      Dr Matthew Currell, Submission 11, p. 9.

[84]      Ms Laura Hogarth, Solicitor, Creevey Russell Lawyers, Proof Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 47.

[85]      Creevey Russell Lawyers, Submission 18, p. 3.

[86]      NSW Young Lawyers, Submission 32, p. 6.

[87]      Professor Samantha Hepburn, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 39.

[88]      NSW Young Lawyers, Submission 32, p. 6.

[89]      Mr Charlie Thomas, NFF, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 28.

[90]      Ms Danica Leys, Policy Director, Environment, New South Wales Farmers Association, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 28.

[91]      Ms Rosemary Nankivell, Chairman, Save Our Soils Liverpool Plains, Proof Committee Hansard, 25 August 2015, p. 3.

[92]      Ms Danica Leys, New South Wales Farmers Association, Proof Committee Hansard, 28 July 2015, p. 23.

[93]      Mr Paul Nankivell, Adviser, Save Our Soils Liverpool Plains, Proof Committee Hansard, 25 August 2015, p. 5.

Australian Greens' Dissenting Report

[1]        Mr Drew Hutton, Lock the Gate, Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 9.

[2]        Miss Lyn Nicholson, Basin Sustainability Alliance, Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 17.

[3]        Ms Rosemary Nankivell, SOS Liverpool Plains, Committee Hansard, 25 August 2015, p. 2.

[4]        Ms Kirsty Kelly, People for the Plains, Committee Hansard, 25 August 2015, p. 16.

[5]        Mr Lestar Manning, P&E Law, Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 17.

[6]        Chair's report, chapter 4, paragraph 4.1.

[7]        Ms Shay Dougall, Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 26.

[8]        Ms Narelle Northdurft, Submission 96, p. 5.

[9]        Dr Geralyn McCarron, Committee Hansard, 27 July 2015, p. 60.

[10]      CSIRO, answers to questions on notice, question 5.

[11]      Chair's report, chapter 4, paragraph 4.6.

[12]      EDOs of Australia, Submission 33, p. 9.

[13]      More information on the Bill can be found here: http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=s992 and here: http://lee-rhiannon.greensmps.org.au/content/media-releases/greens-bill-ban-political-donations-developers-tobacco-alcohol-gambling-and-m

Appendix 3 - List of recent inquiries and reviews into matters related to unconventional gas

[1]        The inquiry was conducted by the Legislative Council General Purpose Standing Committee No. 5. See www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/committee.nsf/0/318A94F2301A0‌B2FCA2579F1001419E5?open&refnavid=CO3_1.

[2]        See www.chiefscientist.nsw.gov.au/coal-seam-gas-review.

[3]        See www.resourcesandenergy.nsw.gov.au/landholders-and-community/landholders-rights/walker-review-of-land-arbitration-framework.

[4]        See www.energyandresources.vic.gov.au/about-us/publications/Gas-Market-Taskforce-report.

[5]        See www.parliament.vic.gov.au/57th-parliament/edic/inquiries/article/1391.

[6]        See www.qca.org.au/Other-Sectors/Productivity/Completed-Reviews/Coal-Seam-Gas.

[7]        See www.parliament.wa.gov.au/Parliament/commit.nsf/WCurrentNameNew/5A73802849C‌79D1E48257831003B03B2?OpenDocument.

[8]        See www.parliament.sa.gov.au/Committees/Pages/Committees.aspx?CTId=5&CId=295.

[9]        See http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/Documents/Review%20of%20hydraulic%20fracturing%20in‌%20Tasmania%20-%20Final%20Report%20%2025%20Feb%2015.pdf.

[10]      The report was provided to the committee by Dr Hawke and published as Additional information 1.

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