Chapter 9 References


[1] ‘Question’ in this sense means the matter to be voted on.

[2]See Ch. on ‘Order of business and the sitting day’.

[3]See also May, 24th edn, p. 392. The motion providing for the discussion of a matter of special interest under S.O. 50 (see p. 334) really fits neither of these definitions.

[4] S.O. 2.

[5] S.O. 111.

[6] S.O. 108.

[7] S.O.120 (see page 317).

[8] VP 1920–21/184 (20.5.1920).

[9] VP 1954–55/180 (28.4.1955); H.R. Deb. (28.4.1955) 230–1.

[10] VP 1954–55/269–70 (10.6.1955); H.R. Deb. (10.6.1955) 1629.

[11] S.O. 87.

[12] H.R. Deb. (15.9.2008) 7362.

[13] H.R. Deb. (29.5.1908) 11702.

[14] S.O. 106(c), e.g. H.R. Deb. (22.5.2012) 5073.

[15] H.R. Deb. (29.3.2004) 27401, 27511.

[16] S.O. 107.

[17] E.g. Protection of Australian Flags (Desecration of the Flag) Bill 2003, sponsored by 2 Members, H.R. Deb. (18.8.2003) 18671–3, VP 2002–04/1085 (18.8.2003); Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Amendment (Fair Protection for Firefighters) Bill 2011, sponsored by 3 Members, H.R. Deb. (4.7.2011) 7271–4, VP 2010–13/713 (4.7.2011); Marriage Legislation Amendment Bill 2015, sponsored by 7 Members, H.R. Deb. (17.8.2015) 8409, VP 2013–16/1513 (17.8.2015); Marriage Legislation Amendment Bill 2016 [No. 2], sponsored by 3 Members, H.R. Deb. (12.9.2016) 418, VP 2013–16/97 (12.9.2016). (Senate S.O. 76(4) provides for joint notices.)

[18] S.O. 106.

[19] PP 102 (1992).

[20] NP 1 (21.5.1901) 1. The contingent factor was ‘When the Standing Orders are submitted for the approval of the House’.

[21] Such notices of continuing effect remain on the Notice Paper, even though moved and agreed to.

[22] For examples of other contingent notices relating to specific occasions or items of business see NP 145 (8.12.1971) 11529; NP 180 (15.8.1972) 14646; NP 45 (5.12.1974) 4942, VP 1974–75/422 (5.12.1974); NP 84 (16.2.2006) 3769.

[23] S.O. 108.

[24] S.O. 45.

[25]  S.O.s 41, 222.

[26]  S.O. 42.

[27]See Ch. on ‘Order of business and the sitting day’.

[28] E.g. a later hour, the next sitting, the next sitting Monday, or a specified date.

[29] S.O. 109(a).

[30] S.O. 109(b).

[31] H.R. Deb. (23.10.1975) 2447.

[32] S.O. 110(a).

[33] S.O. 108.

[34] NP 91 (4.4.1979) 4984; NP 92 (5.4.1979) 5011. This is also a case of where a notice, first given over a year earlier, was altered by omitting all words after ‘That’ and substituting other words as subsequent events had overtaken the purpose of the original notice. The amendment was considered acceptable as it covered the same subject matter, together with subsequent events. A proposal to substitute words which had no relationship to the original notice would not have been in order.

[35] E.g. VP 1973–74/124 (12.4.1973); VP 1998–2001/1118 (6.12.1999); VP 2004–07/602 (12.9.2005), 1150 (29.5.2006); VP 2010–13/1016 (31.10.2011); VP 2013–16/957 (30.10.2014), 773–4 (1.9.2014).

[36] S.O. 110(c). A private Member’s notice may be withdrawn even after it has been accorded priority by the Selection Committee.

[37] S.O. 113, e.g. VP 1983–84/915 (4.10.1984); VP 2008–10/1768 (24.5.2010); VP 2016–18/284 (7.11.2016).

[38] S.O. 117(b), H.R. Deb. (19.3.1908) 9352.

[39] S.O. 113, e.g. VP 2010–13/811 (22.8.2011).

[40] S.O. 113.

[41] E.g. VP 2016–18/165, 166 (10.10.2016).

[42] E.g. VP 2016–18/97, 98 (12.9.2016).

[43] S.O. 109(a).

[44] H.R. Deb. (1.10.1912) 3621–3; VP 1912/161 (8.10.1912); H.R. Deb. (8.10.1912) 3911–33.

[45] H.R. Deb. (25.3.1920) 881–2; VP 1920–21/91 (26.3.1920); H.R. Deb. (26.3.1920) 906–10.

[46] H.R. Deb. (1.10.1912) 3623.

[47] H.R. Deb. (4.5.1977) 1510.

[48] E.g. H.R. Deb. (1.4.1998) 2128.

[49] E.g. H.R. Deb. (17.9.2003) 20229; H.R. Deb. (10.10.2006) 19–20.

[50] A motion dissenting from the ruling was negatived. H.R. Deb. (4.9.1997) 7796–805; VP 1996–98/1949–51 (4.9.1997).

[51] As a general observation, the subjunctive mood is routinely used when a motion proposes that the House order something to be done—for example: ‘That the bill be read a second time’; ‘That debate be adjourned’; ‘That standing orders be suspended’. When a motion expresses an opinion it is more usual to use the indicative mood, as the words of the motion are descriptive (i.e. of a view held)—for example, ‘That the House is of the opinion that … ’.

[52] VP 2004–07/1447 (10.10.2006).

[53] VP 1934–37/38 (28.11.1934); H.R. Deb. (28.11.1934) 582–3, 610. The Speaker first ruled that the Member was in order in giving the notice, but later made a statement that in its present form he would not allow it to be placed on the Notice Paper.

[54] H.R. Deb. (17.9.1980) 1364.

[55] H.R. Deb. (1.10.1912) 3621–3.

[56] NP 26 (5.10.1983) 1044 (the notice did appear once before being removed).

[57] H.R. Deb. (24.3.2011) 3245.

[58] NP 167 (28.9.1995) 8994; NP 176 (20.11.1995) 9443–4; VP 1993–96/2573 (20.11.1995).

[59] S.O. 114(b).

[60] VP 1946–48/119 (18.3.1947); H.R. Deb. (18.3.1947) 741.

[61] H.R. Deb. (12.8.1954) 225.

[62] VP 2008–10/1184 (24.6.2009).

[63] H.R. Deb. (9.10.1936) 1013.

[64] E.g. VP 1950–51/189 (4.10.1950); VP 1985–87/1307–9 (14.11.1986), 1512 (18.3.1987), 1541–2, 1544–8 (25.3.1987); VP 1996–98/1786 (26.6.1997), 2665–74 (4.12.1997), 2769 (5.3.1998), 2176 (23.10.1997), 2675 (4.12.1997), 2794 (10.3.1998).

[65] VP 2008–10/869–76 (12.2.2009).

[66] VP 1970–72/673–4 (24.8.1971), 1014 (18.4.1972); NP 111 (26.8.1971) 8230; NP 165 (19.4.1972) 13196.

[67] VP 1973–74/171–2 (10.5.1973), 325–6 (13.9.1973); NP 29 (24.5.1973) 1149; NP 32 (30.5.1973) 1294–5; NP 42 (13.9.1973) 1657–8.

[68]See VP 1912/56 (23.7.1912), 165–6 (10.10.1912) where a motion approving the electoral distribution of a State was superseded when the House agreed to an amendment referring the report back to the commissioners. A motion approving the fresh distribution was later submitted and agreed to.

[69] E.g. VP 1993–96/172 (19.8.1993), 211 (2.9.1993), 1616 (5.12.1994); VP 1998–2001/183 (7.12.1998), 1067 (22.11.1999).

[70] E.g. VP 1998–2001/832 (1.9.1999); VP 2008–10/191–2 (19.3.2008).

[71] S.O. 111. see Ch. on ‘Order of business and the sitting day’ for the order in which the Chair calls on motions.

[72] VP 1974–75/338 (21.11.1974); H.R. Deb. (21.11.1974) 3899.

[73] However, this has been done by leave, e.g. VP 2002–04/1648 (31.5.2004); VP 2010–13/916 (19.9.2011); VP 2013–16/972 (24.11.2014), 1769, 1770 (30.11.2015). Standing orders have been suspended to permit a private Member’s bill to be presented by another Member, VP 2002–04/510 (21.10.2002).

[74] H.R. Deb. (15.6.1918) 6206.

[75] H.R. Deb. (17.3.1944) 1563–4.

[76] S.O. 80.

[77] S.O. 81.

[78] S.O. 116(a). Standing orders have been suspended to allow the revival of a private Member’s bill that had lapsed when there had not been a seconder for the motion that the bill be read a second time, VP 2010–13/2192–3 (20.3.2013).

[79] H.R. Deb. (4.5.1978) 1814.

[80] H.R. Deb. (21.9.1909) 3608. This practice was formally extended to Assistant Ministers in 1972, VP 1970–72/1009–10 (13.4.1972); Standing Orders Committee report, PP 20 (1972) 1, 6–7; and, in 1990, to Parliamentary Secretaries, VP 1990–93/38 (9.5.1990), 1083–4 (16.10.1991).

[81] S.O. 116(b).

[82] S.O. 116(c). The exemption was originally provided by resolution of the House in 1994, VP 1993–96/982–3 (12.5.1994).

[83] That is, the Member performing the role equivalent to that of the Duty Minister in the House, usually a committee chair, e.g. H.R. Deb. (23.6.2010) 6474.

[84] For example, the following motions: that a Member be heard now (S.O. 65(c)), that a Member be further heard (S.O. 75), that the debate be now adjourned (S.O. 79(a)), that a Member be granted an extension of time (S.O. 1), that the question be now put (S.O. 81), that a Member be no longer heard (S.O. 80) and that the business of the day be called on (S.O. 46(c)).

[85] E.g. H.R. Deb. (26.9.1974) 1859; H.R. Deb. (17.10.1974) 2507–9; H.R. Deb. (28.10.2010) 1990. A Member has seconded the motion for the second reading of a bill so that it could be debated, even though opposing the bill, H.R. Deb. (12.6.2012) 6838–9.

[86] S.O.s 151, 159.

[87] S.O.s 47, 87.

[88] S.O. 70.

[89] S.O. 116(a), e.g. second reading amendment not seconded, H.R. Deb. (13.10.2003) 21260; motion for suspension of standing orders not seconded, H.R. Deb. (22.6.2011) 6910. However, the Votes and Proceedings have on occasion noted a motion having lapsed when it has been necessary to give context to related proceedings: VP 2010–13/2173 (18.3.2013), 2192–3 (20.3.2013)—order of the day for the second reading of bill lapsed for want of a seconder, as in this case the bill was restored to the Notice Paper after the House agreed to suspend standing orders; VP 2016–18/982–3 (15.8.2017)—closure of mover of motion to suspend standing orders divided on, but the motion then lapsed for want of seconder (text of lapsed motion not recorded).

[90] VP 1998–2001/1936 (30.11.2000).

[91] E.g. VP 2010–13/539 (24.5.2011), 1890 (11.10.2012).

[92] H.R. Deb. (12.8.2004) 32979–80.

[93] H.R. Deb. (2.4.1981) 1316 (motion to suspend standing orders moved immediately prior to the automatic adjournment dropped).

[94] E.g. VP 2010–13/177 (15.11.2010).

[95] E.g. VP 1987–90/978 (1.12.1988); VP 1996–98/1327 (24.3.1997).

[96] H.R. Deb. (11.11.1913) 3008–9.

[97] S.O. 67. E.g. H.R. Deb. (10.6.1999) 6655–6; H.R. Deb. (25.9.2008) 8689. The Speaker has directed the Clerk to read the terms of a matter under discussion, H.R. Deb. (7.12.1904) 8016.

[98]See also ‘Withdrawal or removal of notice’ at p. 296.

[99] S.O. 117(b).

[100] VP 1970–72/127 (8.5.1970).

[101] H.R. Deb. (20.9.2007) 95.

[102] VP 1929–31/302 (10.7.1930).

[103]May, 24th edn, p. 402.

[104] S.O. 50.

[105] VP 1974–75/815–7 (9.7.1975).

[106] S.O.s 146, 155(b); and see Ch. on ‘Legislation’.

[107] E.g. VP 1993–96/2360 (31.8.1995).

[108] S.O. 97.

[109] S.O. 197(a).

[110] S.O. 83.

[111] VP 1920–21/498 (21.4.1921), 499–500 (22.4.1921); H.R. Deb. (21.4.1921) 7663. The declaration was made on a motion to print a paper relating to the League of Nations mandate for the German possessions in the Pacific.

[112] For further discussion on the limitation of debate procedure see Ch. on ‘Legislation’.

[113] S.O. 119.

[114] VP 1970–72/242–3 (19.8.1970).

[115] VP 1906/55 (18.7.1906).

[116] VP 1929–31/748 (17.7.1931).

[117] VP 1903/144 (23.9.1903).

[118] VP 1905/136 (26.10.1905).

[119] VP 1978–80/366 (23.8.1978).

[120] VP 1920–21/659 (7.7.1921).

[121] H.R. Deb. (18.11.1959) 2822. A Member objecting to a suggestion that a question be divided, the Speaker has ruled that the motion be voted on as submitted, H.R. Deb. (18.12.1914) 2269.

[122] VP 2002–04/1550–2 (30.3.2004), H.R. Deb. (30.3.2004) 27592–5.

[123] S.O. 117(c).

[124] S.O. 125. For a full discussion of division procedures see Ch. on ‘Order of business and the sitting day’.

[125] S.O. 121(a).

[126] S.O. 32(a).

[127] S.O. 121(b).

[128] E.g. NP 78 (22.11.1907) 352.

[129] VP 1951–53/133 (18.10.1951).

[130] H.R. Deb. (19.11.1914) 841.

[131] H.R. Deb. (23.9.1903) 5437.

[132] H.R. Deb. (25.8.1910) 2088; VP 2010–13/83–4 (18.10.2010).

[133] H.R. Deb. (19.10.1905) 3814.

[134] H.R. Deb. (24.7.1903) 2609.

[135] H.R. Deb. (13.4.1961) 894.

[136] H.R. Deb. (5.7.1906) 1056.

[137] S.O. 116(b).

[138] S.O. 151.

[139] S.O. 159.

[140] H.R. Deb. (11.8.1910) 1439.

[141] S.O. 121(b).

[142] VP 1929–31/581 (21.4.1931); H.R. Deb. (21.4.1931) 1065. The amendment was recorded in the Votes and Proceedings.

[143] S.O. 70.

[144] E.g. H.R. Deb. (13.10.2005) 93–6.

[145]See H.R. Deb. (12.4.1956) 1332. The amendment was recorded in the Votes and Proceedings as it had been properly moved and seconded, VP 1956–57/74 (12.4.1956). For more recent example see VP 2002–04/1625 (26.5.2004).

[146] E.g. H.R. Deb. (10.10.2006) 28.

[147] S.O. 121(c); and see Ch. on ‘Legislation’ regarding second reading amendment.

[148] S.O. 192b(b); and see Ch. on ‘Financial legislation’ regarding scope of amendment on appropriation and supply bills.

[149]See also May, 24th edn, p. 409.

[150] H.R. Deb. (27.5.1975) 2872.

[151] Private ruling, Speaker Halverson.

[152] H.R. Deb. (7.12.1998) 1503, 1509–10. An extension of time was agreed to permit the Member to read out the amendment.

[153] S.O. 123(a).

[154] H.R. Deb. (16.11.1905) 5383.

[155] H.R. Deb. (15.9.1909) 3496.

[156] S.O. 114(b), (subject to S.O 150 in relation to the consideration in detail stage of bills).

[157] S.O. 123(b).

[158]See also Josef Redlich, The procedure of the House of Commons, vol. II, Archibald Constable, London, 1908, p. 231, and May, 24th edn, p. 410.

[159] H.R. Deb. (21.11.1905) 5512, 5514.

[160] VP 1929–31/903 (14.10.1931).

[161] H.R. Deb. (26.7.1922) 785; NP 12 (26.7.1922) 65.

[162] S.O. 123(d).

[163]See also statement by Speaker Aston to the House, H.R. Deb. (2.6.1970) 2712–16. The precedents recorded with this statement generally indicate that the rule is best interpreted in a very precise way.

[164]May, 24th edn, p. 409.

[165] VP 1908/79 (10.11.1908); VP 1913/204 (11.12.1913).

[166] VP 1908/79 (10.11.1908); H.R. Deb. (10.11.1908) 2140. The amendment resulted in the fall of the Deakin Government, see p. 322.

[167] VP 1908/53–4 (21.10.1908).

[168] H.R. Deb. (28.9.1905) 2967–8.

[169] VP 1948–49/381 (8.9.1949); H.R. Deb. (8.9.1949) 119.

[170] VP 1970–72/153–4 (15.5.1970); H.R. Deb. (15.5.1970) 2304–23.

[171] VP 1970–72/171 (2.6.1970); H.R. Deb. (2.6.1970) 2712–17.

[172] E.g. VP 1974–75/879 (28.8.1975); VP 1977/406 (4.11.1977); VP 1978–80/1283–4 (27.2.1980), 1290 (28.2.1980);
VP 1990–931352 (4.3.1992); H.R. Deb. (4.3.1992) 708; VP 1990–93/1752–3 (8.10.1992); H.R. Deb. (8.10.1992) 1769.

[173]See Ch. on ‘Control and conduct of debate’.

[174] H.R. Deb. (26.10.1927) 749; H.R. Deb. (26.3.1931) 665.

[175] H.R. Deb. (21.5.1914) 1392, 1395; and see VP 1929–31/503 (26.3.1931).

[176] H.R. Deb. (10.11.2005) 38; VP 2004–07/768 (10.11.2005).

[177] VP 1970–72/264 (26.8.1970). The amendment was to enable a recommendation of the Public Works Committee to be referred to a select committee of the House. The Speaker ruled that the proposed amendment did not comply with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act.

[178] VP 1929–31/601–2 (30.4.1931).

[179] S.O. 123(e).

[180] S.O. 123(b).

[181] VP 1943–44/93 (15.3.1944); H.R. Deb. (15.3.1944) 1360–1.

[182] VP 1974–75/639–40 (15.5.1975) (committee); VP 1978–80/683 (21.3.1979); H.R. Deb. (21.3.1979) 960; H.R. Deb. (22.3.1979) 1103 (House).

[183] S.O. 121(d).

[184] VP 1973–74/221–2 (24.5.1973).

[185] VP 1917–19/23 (26.7.1917).

[186] S.O. 124.

[187] E.g. VP 2010–13/1754 (10.9.2012).

[188] S.O. 122(b). In order to avoid confusion as to which amendment is before the House, the Chair may include the name of the mover when putting the question, e.g. VP 1962–63/279–80 (7.11.1962); VP 1974–75/646–8 (19.5.1975).

[189] S.O. 161(c)—see Ch. on ‘Senate amendments and requests’.

[190] S.O. 122(a)(i).

[191] S.O. 122(a)(ii).

[192] S.O. 122(a)(iii).

[193] S.O. 122(b).

[194] Standing Committee on Procedure, Interim report: monitoring and review of procedural changes implemented in the 43rd Parliament, April 2011, pp. 56–7.

[195] VP 2010–13/614 (2.6.2011); H.R. Deb. (2.6.2011) 5790.

[196] S.O. 118(a).

[197] H.R. Deb. (8.10.1908) 961; H.R. Deb. (21.11.1905) 5515; VP 1996–98/3031 (26.5.1998).

[198] VP 1908/54 (21.10.1908).

[199] VP 1908/79 (10.11.1908); H.R. Deb. (10.11.1908) 2140.

[200] S.O. 118(b).

[201] H.R. Deb. (15.8.1968) 252.

[202] Josef Redlich, The procedure of the House of Commons, Archibald Constable, London, 1908, vol. II, p. 222.

[203]May, 24th edn, p. 424.

[204] Recent editions of May have omitted the statement that ‘the application of the term is carefully regulated with reference to the content of the motion’, see May, 19th edn (1976), p. 382.

[205] VP 1950–51/217 (24.10.1950); VP 1962–63/500 (23.5.1963).

[206]See Lord Campion, An introduction to the procedure of the House of Commons, 3rd edn, London, Macmillan, 1958. p. 104.

[207] VP 1978–80/1672–3 (17.9.1980).

[208]See section on ‘Sources of procedural authority’ in Ch. on ‘The Speaker, Deputy Speakers and officers’.

[209] S.O. 3(a).

[210] VP 1983–84/945–6 (8.10.1984).

[211] VP 1993–96/25 (5.5.1993).

[212] VP 1993–96/982–3 (12.5.1994).

[213] VP 1993–96/1620 (5.12.1994).

[214]See also Quick and Garran, pp. 507–8.

[215] H.R. Deb. (5.5.1993) 89.

[216]And see H.R. Deb. (28.10.2010) 2074.

[217] VP 1978–80/1673 (17.9.1980).

[218] VP 1980–83/80 (24.2.1981).

[219]See May, 24th edn, pp. 288–90.

[220]May, 24th edn, p. 428.

[221] VP 1903/181 (21.10.1903); H.R. Deb. (21.10.1903) 6382.

[222] VP 1945–46/213 (1.8.1945).

[223] VP 1974/28–9 (6.3.1974); H.R. Deb. (6.3.1974) 132.

[224] E.g. VP 1974–75/105 (31.7.1974); VP 2004–07/2161 (20.9.2007); but see VP 2010–13/2244 (15.5.2013) where leave was given to suspend standing orders to allow debate on the second reading of a number of bills to be resumed at a later hour without rescinding the earlier decisions of the House to adjourn debate to the next sitting.

[225] VP 1978–80/1093 (18.10.1979).

[226] VP 1985–87/893 (30.4.1986).

[227] VP 1987–90/907–9, 925–7 (23.11.1988).

[228] VP 1993–96/1803–4 (8.2.1995).

[229] Native Title Amendment Bill 1997 [No.2], VP 1996–98/3202 (2.7.1998).

[230] VP 1990–93/1645–54 (19.8.1992).

[231] VP 1974–75/467 (19.2.1975); H.R. Deb. (19.2.1975) 474–5.

[232] VP 1978–80/147 (31.4.1978).

[233] VP 1978–80/975 (11.9.1979).

[234] VP 1976–77/389 (12.10.1976) (notice given 5 Oct. for 12 Oct., NP 54 (6.10.1976) 2336).

[235] VP 1974–75/521 (4.3.1975); VP 2002–04/1748 (24.6.2004).

[236] VP 1922/93 (25.8.1922) (seven days’ notice was not required because it was a resolution of the previous session).

[237] VP 1987–90/1055 (7.3.1989).

[238] VP 1998–2001/1784 (9.10.2000).

[239] VP 1907–08/268 (13.12.1907); VP 1914–17/571 (28.2.1917); VP 1920–21/155 (12.5.1920).

[240] VP 1968–69/230 (10.10.1968).

[241] VP 2004–07/1009 (2.3.2006).

[242] E.g. VP 2010–13/2265 (16.5.2013).

[243] Division name changed from Ballaarat to Ballarat in 1977.

[244] VP 1914–17/181 (29.4.1915); H.R. Deb. (29.4.1915) 2748–9.

[245]See also Ch. on ‘The Parliament and the role of the House’. Motions censuring or expressing lack of confidence in the occupant of the Chair are dealt with in Ch. on ‘The Speaker, Deputy Speakers and officers’.

[246] VP 1970–72/445–6 (18.2.1971).

[247] S.O. 48. The acceptance is by way of a Minister’s formal statement to the House, for example, ‘I inform the House that I accept the notice of motion as a motion of censure of the Government for the purpose of standing order 48’, H.R. Deb. (19.3.1985) 461.

[248] S.O. 1.

[249] NP 14 (17.9.1974) 1128. For further discussion of the time for moving see Ch. on ‘Order of business and the sitting day’.

[250] A notice of motion which expresses censure of or no confidence in the Government, or a censure of any Member, must be reported to the House by the Clerk at the first convenient opportunity, S.O. 106(c).

[251] VP 1974–75/61 (23.7.1974).

[252] VP 1974–75/167 (18.9.1974).

[253] VP 1946–48/250 (17.9.1947).

[254]See Odgers, 6th edn, pp. 967–8.

[255] The most recent occasion of a motion being accepted under standing order 48 (then S.O. 110) was in 1985. VP 1985–87/81 (19.3.1985); H.R. Deb. (19.3.1985) 461.

[256] VP 1970–72/471 (15.3.1971).

[257] Alpheus Todd, Parliamentary government in England (New edition, Spencer Walpole), Sampson Low, Marsden and Company, London, 1892, vol. II, p. 121.

[258] For Canadian precedent on 28 November 2005 see Journals of the House of Commons, No. 159, Division 190.

[259] Sir Ivor Jennings, Cabinet government, 3rd edn, Cambridge University Press, 1961. p. 493.

[260] ibid., p. 495.

[261] VP 1974–75/987–90 (16.10.1975).

[262] VP 1903/216 (11.9.1903); H.R. Deb. (8.9.1903) 4788; H.R. Deb. (9.9.1903) 4838–40. Ironically the amendment was very similar to that which led to the resignation of the Deakin Ministry in 1904.

[263] VP 1903/205 (31.7.1903), 207 (7.8.1903); H.R. Deb. (9.9.1903) 4838.

[264] VP 1901–02/386, 387, 388 (17.4.1902), 718 (21.3.1902), 726 (4.4.1902), 728 (11.4.1902).

[265] VP 1904/279, 280 (9.6.1904), 284 (24.6.1904), 287 (21.7.1904) (amendments made that were opposed by the Government).

[266] The Parliamentary Allowances Bill 1922, which proposed to reduce Members’ salaries, negatived by 26 votes to 35, VP 1922/207 (11.10.1922); H.R. Deb. (11.10.1922) 3573–97. Members did not divide on party lines and the division seems to have been regarded as a free vote.

[267] H.R. Deb. (17.8.1923) 2964.

[268] i.e. of eligible votes, not including the Speaker’s.

[269] VP 1962–63/194 (21.8.1962), 217–8 (3.10.1962), 307–8 (27.11.1962). The Government was also defeated on an opposition amendment to remove words from a clause of a bill. However, later in the sitting the Government successfully moved that the bill be reconsidered and the omitted words reinserted, VP 1962–63/348–9 (5.12.1962), 360–1 (6.12.1962).

[270] H.R. Deb. (15.10.1963) 1790.

[271] The first loss was over an opposition amendment to a proposed amendment to a standing order, H.R. Deb. (29.9.2010) 141–2. Other losses were on procedural motions, such as closures, and on items put forward by private Members.

[272] VP 2016–18/86–8 (1.9.2016); 1269–70 (6.12.2017). In other cases the Government, having lost a division due to ‘misadventure’, won the vote after the division had been repeated pursuant to S.O. 132.

[273] VP 1904/49 (27.4.1904), 273 (21.4.1904); H.R. Deb. (19.4.1904) 1043, 1047; H.R. Deb. (21.4.1904) 1247.

[274] VP 1904/147 (12.8.1904), 149 (17.8.1904).

[275] VP 1905/7 (30.6.1905), 9 (5.7.1905).

[276] VP 1908/78 (6.11.1908), 79 (10.11.1908), 81 (12.11.1908); H.R. Deb. (6.11.1908) 2136; H.R. Deb. (10.11.1908) 2139–40.

[277] VP 1909/7 (27.5.1909), 9 (28.5.1909), 11 (1.6.1909); H.R. Deb. (27.5.1909) 126; H.R. Deb. (28.5.1909) 169.

[278] VP 1929/118 (10.9.1929), 121 (12.9.1929); H.R. Deb. (10.9.1929) 841, 850, 867; H.R. Deb. (12.9.1929) 873–4.

[279] VP 1929–31/945 (25.11.1931), 947, 948 (26.11.1931); H.R. Deb. (25.11.1931) 1899; H.R. Deb. (26.11.1931) 1926–7.

[280] VP 1940–43/193 (3.10.1941), 195 (8.10.1941); H.R. Deb. (3.10.1941) 720.

[281] VP 1907–08/377–8 (9.4.1908); H.R. Deb. (9.4.1908) 10451–60.

[282] VP 1917–19/157–8 (10.1.1918).

[283] VP 1920–21/489 (14.4.1921), 491 (15.4.1921), 493–4 (20.4.1921); H.R. Deb. (15.4.1921) 7466; H.R. Deb. (20.4.1921) 7497–9.

[284] VP 1940–43/105 (2.4.1941); and see VP 1913/46 (5.9.1913), 47 (6.9.1913); VP 1978–80/1020–3 (26.9.1979).

[285] Almost all have been censure motions.

[286] E.g. VP 1987–90/461 (18.4.1988).

[287] E.g. VP 1993–96/1964–7 (9.3.1995); VP 1998–2001/341 (18.2.1999); VP 2010–13/398 (3.3.2011). It needs to be noted that a motion to suspend standing orders to enable a censure motion is not a censure motion in itself, but a procedural step towards allowing a censure to be moved. Such motions could sometimes be regarded as coming under the category of motions to suspend standing orders as a tactical measure—see page 338.

[288] E.g. VP 1993–96/1781–3 (2.2.1995); VP 1998–2001/581 (9.6.1999).

[289] The resultant censure motion was amended to censure the shadow minister and agreed to, VP 2002–04/914 (29.5.2003).

[290] The double dissolution proclamation was signed before the Speaker was able to see the Governor-General and convey the resolution. For details of the events of 11.11.1975 see Ch. on ‘Double dissolutions and joint sittings’.

[291] For a summary of cases see ‘Cessation of ministerial office’ in Ch. on ‘House, Government and Opposition’.

[292] VP 1968–69/150–1 (14.8.1968).

[293] VP 1978–80/133–6 (12.4.1978), 917 (7.6.1979).

[294]Odgers, 6th edn, p. 967; 14th edn, pp. 634–43.

[295] J 1973–74/91–2 (4.4.1973), 93–4 (5.4.1973); VP 1973–74/104–6 (10.4.1973).

[296] J 1974–75/195–7 (18.9.1974).

[297] J 1987–90/1399–1400 (1.3.1989) (condemning Minister, inter alia, for criticising the Senate committee system); J 1993–96/2262–3 (12.10.1994) and J 1998–2001/1545–6 (24.8.1999) (censuring Ministers for handling of portfolio responsibilities).

[298] J 1987–90/1712 (25.5.1989) (for failing to answer a question); J 1993–96/1641–2 (10.5.1994) (for failing to comply with Senate order to table documents).

[299] J 1990–93/2965–7 (5.11.1992) (for ‘contemptuous abuse of the Senate’); J 2002–04/216 (19.3.2002) (for not taking certain action in relation to a Senator, who was also censured), J 2002–04/2463 (7.10.2003) (for ‘misleading the Australian Parliament and the Australian people’).

[300] J 1987–90/123–4 (24.9.1987) (for attack on Senate); J 1990–93/1509–10 (12.9.1991) (for failing to comply with Senate order to table a tape recording); J 1987–90/2055 (26.9.1989) (handling of industrial dispute); J 2008–10/3179–81 (23.2.2010) (delivery of certain programs).

[301] E.g. resignation of Senator G.F. Richardson on 19.5.1992 subsequent to censure on 7.5.1992, J 1990–93/2298 (7.5.1992).

[302] E.g. VP 1998–2001/2424–8 (28.6.2001) (motion), 2490–92 (9.8.2001) (amendment), 2517–20 (22.8.2001) (motion); VP 2002–04/76–8 (21.2.2002), 142–6 (21.3.2002) (amendments); VP 2008–10/301–5 (29.5.2008) (amendment).

[303] VP 1983–84/475 (28.2.1984). On a further occasion a motion was put to the House condemning the Leader of the National Party for reflecting on the Speaker, but the motion was withdrawn, by leave, after he had apologised for and withdrawn his remarks, VP 1985–87/1101–2 (16.9.1986).

[304] VP 1977/300–1 (4.10.1977) (for allegedly economically subversive public statements); VP 1993–96/1906 (7.3.1995) (for allegedly misleading the House—the Member subsequently resigned from his shadow portfolio position); and see VP 1993–96/2345–9 (30.8.1995) (for motion of condemnation of a private Member).

[305]See also Ch. on ‘Parliamentary Privilege’.

[306] VP 1993–96/2011–2 (30.3.1995).

[307] VP 1996–98/2772–4 (5.3.1998).

[308] Motions censuring Ministers amended to censure opposition Members (and then agreed to), VP 1998–2001/957–63 (13.10.1999); VP 2002–04/914–7 (29.5.2003).

[309] S.O. 100(c). See also May, 24th edn, p. 396.

[310] VP 1990–93/692–3 (18.4.1991).

[311] VP 1987–90/939–41 (29.11.1988); VP 1990–93/1351–3 (4.3.1992), 1793–6 (3.11.1992); VP 1996–98/1134–7 (13.2.1997).

[312] VP 1987–90/1651–4 (27.11.1989).

[313] VP 1990–93/1701–3 (15.9.1992).

[314] S.O.s 267–70.

[315] VP 1908/5 (16.9.1908).

[316] VP 1908/3–4 (16.9.1908).

[317] VP 1978–80/930 (21.8.1979).

[318] S.O. 267(a).

[319] S.O. 267(b).

[320] The proposed Address was moved as an amendment to the motion to print the reports of a royal commission and prayed that His Excellency would refer the inquiry back to the royal commission for particular action to be taken. Consideration of the motion and amendment lapsed at the prorogation of the Parliament, VP 1934–37/255 (11.4.1935), ci.

[321] E.g. VP 1901–02/439 (28.5.1902); VP 1910/37–8 (21.7.1910); VP 1911/2 (5.9.1911) (joint Address); VP 1934–37/189 (4.4.1935) (joint Address); VP 1937/3 (17.6.1937) (joint Address); VP 1946–48/406 (19.11.1947) (joint Address); VP 1948–49/157 (23.11.1948); VP 1960–61/2 (8.3.1960) (joint Address); VP 1964–66/33 (17.3.1964) (joint Address);VP 1970–72/1159 (29.8.1972); VP 1974–75/9 (9.7.1974); VP 1978–80/959 (28.8.1979); VP 1996–98/1903 (1.9.1997); VP 2002–04/10 (12.2.2002), 157 (14.5.2002), 240 (6.6.2002), 326 (19.8.2002); VP 2010–13/1153 (7.2.2012).

[322] VP 1917–19/357 (13.11.1918); VP 1945–46/221 (29.8.1945).

[323] VP 1964–66/41 (19.3.1964); VP 1978–80/319–20 (8.6.1978) (joint Addresses).

[324] VP 1905/29 (3.8.1905), 123–5 (19.10.1905). An earlier proposed Address on home rule for Ireland lapsed, VP 1904/247 (1.12.1904), xl.

[325] VP 1978–80/319 (8.6.1978); J 1978–80/265 (9.6.1978).

[326] VP 1920–21/185–6 (20.5.1920); VP 1926–28/349 (9.5.1927); VP 1934–37/6–7 (23.10.1934) (joint Address).

[327] VP 1903/183 (21.10.1903); VP 1908/5 (16.9.1908).

[328] VP 1901–02/161 (18.9.1901).

[329] VP 1903/34 (19.6.1903), 63 (21.7.1903); VP 1905/109 (10.10.1905), 119–20 (17.10.1905).

[330] For Parliamentary Service Commissioner see p. 329.

[331] VP 1910/7, 8 (1.7.1910); VP 1929/7 (6.2.1929); VP 1934–37/512 (10.3.1936); VP 1940–43/377 (2.9.1942); VP 1951–53/81 (26.9.1951), 259 (19.2.1952).

[332] VP 1914–17/315 (4.8.1915).

[333] VP 1926–28/349 (9.5.1927).

[334] VP 1926–28/348 (9.5.1927).

[335] VP 2002–04/922 (2.6.2003).

[336] VP 1910/7 (1.7.1910); VP 1934–37/511 (10.3.1936); VP 1937/2 (17.6.1937).

[337] VP 1940–43/477 (16.2.1943); VP 1974–75/153 (17.9.1974).

[338] VP 1923–24/74 (12.7.1923).

[339] VP 1987–90/433 (24.3.1988), 445 (13.4.1988).

[340] S.O. 268.

[341] S.O. 269(a).

[342] S.O. 269(b).

[343] VP 1917–19/359 (14.11.1918).

[344] VP 1926–28/354 (28.9.1927); VP 1934–37/13 (31.10.1934).

[345] VP 1934–37/239 (9.4.1935).

[346] S.O. 270; VP 1978–80/87 (16.3.1978); VP 1998–2001/220 (9.12.1998).

[347] VP 1978–80/327 (15.8.1978), 981 (12.9.1979).

[348]Parliamentary Service Act 1999, s. 45.

[349]See also Ch. on ‘Members’.

[350] The death of a former Senate President has been announced but, at the request of the deceased, no condolence motion moved, VP 1993–96/1618 (5.12.1994).

[351] E.g. VP 1978–80/1243 (19.2.1980); VP 1998–2001/646 (23.6.1999); VP 2010–13/89 (19.10.2010).

[352] H.R. Deb. (20.2.1980) 158, 161; H.R. Deb. (2.4.1980) 1664.

[353] VP 1980–83/10 (25.11.1980).

[354] VP 1990–93/481 (21.1.1991).

[355] E.g. VP 2010–13/10 (28.9.2010).

[356] E.g. Victorian bushfires, 9 February 2009. The House adjourned as a mark of respect, VP 2008–10/849 (9.2.2009), and debate on the motion continued on subsequent days.

[357] E.g. plane crash, VP 2004–07/1777 (20.3.2007); bombings, VP 2008–10/1199 (11.8.2009).

[358] The House has referred a death to the Main Committee (Federation Chamber) ‘for further statements by indulgence’, VP 2008–10/411 (23.6.2008), 436 (25.6.2008); NP 31 (24.6.2008) 32.

[359] VP 1968–69/43 (30.4.1968).

[360] VP 1920–21/119 (23.4.1920); H.R. Deb. (23.4.1920) 1488.

[361] VP 1998–2001/22 (11.11.1998). A Member then read the ode, H.R. Deb. (11.11.1998) 69.

[362] VP 1990–93/1877, 1878 (11.11.1992).

[363] VP 2002–04/385 (29.8.2002); H.R. Deb. (29.8.2002) 6190.

[364] VP 2010–13/367 (1.3.2011).

[365] H.R. Deb. (31.5.2011) 5286.

[366] S.O. 49; and see Ch. on ‘Order of business and the sitting day’.

[367] E.g. VP 1993–96/1345, 1347 (10.10.1994); VP 2002–04/1249, 1252 (14.10.2003) (Members stood as mark of respect when debate was adjourned).

[368] Eg. VP 2002–04/10 (12.2.2002) (three former Ministers); VP 2004–07/1568 (27.11.2006) (former Minister and former Senate President); VP 2004–07/1657 (6.2.2007) (two former Ministers); VP 2010–13/1752 (10.9.2012) (three soldiers).

[369] Formerly only motions relating to committee and delegation reports and motions to take note of documents could be referred. Since Nov. 2004 S.O. 183 has permitted orders of the day for resumption of debate on any motion to be referred.

[370] E.g. Copy of Speaker’s announcement of the death of a former Member, VP 2002–04/1401 (10.2.2004), 1428 (12.2.2004); H.R. Deb. (12.2.2004) 24695–716. Copy of a Tasmanian Government Press release paying tribute to former Premier, VP 2002–04/1713 (21.6.2004), 1729 (22.6.2004).

[371] VP 2002–04/1763 (3.8.2004) (copy of the condolence motion on the death of former Speaker); VP 2004–07/286 (10.5.2005), 475 (23.6.2005) (copies of 3 condolence motions—motions to take note returned to House and agreed to).

[372] E.g. VP 2004–07/839, 844 (5.12.2005), 847 (6.12.2005) (former Minister—the Main Committee met specially for this debate); VP 2004–07/1657 (6.2.2007), 1660–61 (6.2.2007), 1699 (12.2.2007), 1764 (28.2.2007), 1789, 1791 (21.3.2007) (2 former Ministers—debate spread over several weeks between other items of business).

[373] Recent practice has been for the Speaker to ask Members and ‘all present’ to rise, in order to include people in the galleries, e.g. H.R. Deb. (5.7.2011) 7579.

[374] S.O. 49.

[375] VP 1920–21/137 (4.5.1920); VP 1945–46/222 (29.8.1945). On the former occasion the motion of thanks was presented by the Speaker, accompanied by Members, to representatives of the services in Queen’s Hall (Melbourne), VP 1920–21/184 (20.5.1920).

[376] VP 1923–24/197 (24.8.1923).

[377] VP 1925/67 (14.8.1925).

[378] VP 1987–90/621 (22.8.1988).

[379] VP 1987–90/621 (22.8.1988).

[380] VP 2004–07/285 (10.5.2005). A motion on the 60th anniversary of VP day, inter alia also expressing gratitude, was not recorded as a motion of thanks, VP 2004–07/516 (11.8.2005).

[381] Such motions have included: a motion expressing congratulations and gratitude to General McArthur at the end of World War II, VP 1945–46/222 (29.8.1945); motions of congratulation on Australian sporting successes: Americas Cup VP 1983–84/253 (4.10.1983); ascent of Mt Everest, VP 1983–84/929 (5.10.1984) (moved after suspension of standing orders); 15th Commonwealth Games, VP 1993–96/1259 (29.8.1994); a motion congratulating and expressing appreciation of the Royal Military College on the occasion of its 75th anniversary, VP 1985–87/1234 (17.10.1986); motions recognising the success of the Sydney 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and congratulating athletes, organisers and volunteers, VP 1998–2001/1749–50 (3.10.2000), 1819 (30.10.2000); motions ‘of appreciation’ on the occasion of the retirement of Clerks of the House (moved without notice or leave) VP 1980–83/905 (6.5.1982); VP 1985–87/319 (23.5.1985); VP 1990–93/598 (14.3.1991); VP 1996–98/1817 (26.6.1997); VP 2013–16/252 (12.12.2013).

[382] A motion congratulating the Navy on the occasion of its 75th anniversary and expressing thanks to allied naval forces for participation in the celebrations, VP 1985–87/1169 (7.10.1986).

[383] VP 2008–10/10 (12.2.2008).

[384] During the pause the Prime Minister, Leader of the Opposition and Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs met with representatives of Australia’s Indigenous peoples in the distinguished visitors gallery, after which the Prime Minister, together with the Leader of the Opposition, presented the Speaker with a gift on behalf of the representatives.

[385] VP 2008–10/61–2 (13.2.2008), H.R. Deb. (13.2.2008) 167–77.

[386] VP 2008–10/105 (20.2.2008), 134 (11.3.2008).

[387] VP 2008–10/1438–9 (16.11.2009).

[388] VP 2008–10/1533 (26.11.2009).

[389] VP 2010–13/1963 (26.11.2012).

[390] VP 2010–13/2203–04 (21.3.2013).

[391] VP 2013–16/156–7 (3.12.2013).

[392] VP 1974–75/815–7 (9.7.1975); H.R. Deb. (9.7.1975) 3556.

[393] S.O. 3(a).

[394] VP 2004–07/57 (1.12.2004).

[395] S.O. 63.

[396] Speaker’s ruling on proposed suspension of S.O. 179, VP 2010–13/1085 (22.11.2011); H.R. Deb. (22.11.2011) 13418.

[397] H.R. Deb. (10.10.2006) 29.

[398] VP 1970–72/827 (9.11.1971); H.R. Deb. (9.11.1971) 3181.

[399] E.g. VP 1954–55/286 (30.8.1955) (committee of the whole); VP 1996–98/551 (8.10.1996).

[400] E.g. VP 2010–13/68 (30.9.2010), in relation to the first meeting of the Selection Committee in the 43rd Parliament.

[401] S.O. 116. On one occasion a motion not seconded was agreed to by the House and the Speaker later stated that he was satisfied that the will of the House had been discharged, H.R. Deb. (27.10.1977) 2557–8; H.R. Deb. (1.11.1977) 2593–4.

[402] H.R. Deb. (3.11.1915) 7131; H.R. Deb. (10.11.1915) 7406–7.

[403] H.R. Deb. (11.8.1904) 4149.

[404] VP 1983–84/543 (27.3.1984); H.R. Deb. (27.3.1984) 803.

[405] S.O. 47(b).

[406] S.O. 1.

[407] And thus the time limits for a suspension motion without notice (see page 339) and the requirement for an absolute majority (see page 340) do not apply.

[408] H.R. Deb. (2.8.1905) 471.

[409] S.O. 47(c)—see ‘Absolute majority’ at page 340.

[410] S.O. 66.

[411] In such cases, until the question on the suspension motion has been proposed by the Chair, it can be superseded by the closure of the question currently before the House. E.g. H.R. Deb. (12.8.2004) 33002–3.

[412] H.R. Deb. (28–29.10.1970) 2969; VP 1983–84/543 (27.3.1984); H.R. Deb. (27.3.1984) 803.

[413] Cases described at page 298.

[414] VP 1967–68/50 (16.3.1967); the motion proposed to suspend standing orders to enable a Minister to complete an answer to a question without limitation of time. See also H.R. Deb. (20.3.1980) 1008; the motion proposed to suspend standing orders to enable matter to be incorporated in Hansard.

[415] H.R. Deb. (12.10.1972) 2549.

[416] H.R. Deb. (28–29.10.1970) 2969; H.R. Deb. 27.6.2013) 7.

[417] H.R. Deb. (13.8.2015) 8267–9.

[418] H.R. Deb. (3.3.1998) 174; H.R. Deb. (11.12.13) 2389—Speaker had given Member call to raise a point of order only, not to seek to move a motion.

[419] VP 1977/115 (5.5.1977).

[420] VP 1993–96/2345 (30.8.1995).

[421] VP 2004–07/1447 (10.10.2006).

[422] H.R. Deb. (24.3.2011) 3245.

[423] H.R. Deb. (4.12.2003) 23779.

[424] VP 2002–04/969 (18.6.2003). For an acceptable form of motion later in the sitting see VP 2002–04/973 (18.6.2003).

[425]See Ch. on ‘Order of business and the sitting day’.

[426] VP 1978–80/1416 (22.4.1980).

[427] VP 1970–72/607 (6.5.1971), H.R. Deb. (6.5.1971) 2720–3—for remainder of period of sittings (pursuant to notice); VP 1978–80/1028–9 (26.9.1979), H.R. Deb. (26.9.1979) 1562—for remainder of day (without notice by absolute majority); VP 1993–96/177–8 (19.8.1993) (on notice)—on 19 August 1993, the period covered was ‘all sittings up to and including Thursday, 28 October 1993’; VP 1996–98/1037–9 (12.12.1996).

[428] H.R. Deb. (20.12.1990) 4719–24, 4889—on each Thursday for remainder of the Parliament (notice given by private Member following disruption to private Members’ business period); H.R. Deb. (30.5.1991) 4504—until commencement of next period of sittings; H.R. Deb. (25.2.1992) 105—for remainder of sitting; H.R. Deb. (4.3.1992) 765—for duration of questions without notice at each sitting for remainder of period of sittings; H.R. Deb. (24.6.1999) 7494; H.R. Deb. (18.6.2003) 16899; H.R. Deb. (16.3.2005) 149—for remainder of period of sittings. See also H.R. Deb. (3.3.2011) 2291—‘any motion moved during Question Time other than a motion moved by a Minister’.

[429] PP 20 (1972) 7–8.

[430] VP 1970–72/1012 (18.4.1972); H.R. Deb. (18.4.1972) 1702–3.

[431] H.R. Deb. (27.3.1984) 803.

[432] S.O. 1.

[433] S.O 76.

[434] E.g. H.R. Deb. (3.3.2011) 2271; H.R. Deb. (1.3.2012) 2525–31; for early case see H.R. Deb. (22.7.1921) 10517–19.

[435] VP 2004–07/1157–8 (30.5.2006).

[436] E.g. VP 1970–72/544 (23.4.1971); VP 2002–04/793 (19.3.2003); VP 2004–07/2163 (20.9.2007).

[437] VP 2004–07/1447 (10.10.2006).

[438] Standing Committee on Procedure, Motion to suspend standing orders to condemn a Member: report on events of 10 October 2006. PP 431 (2006) 18.

[439] S.O. 2 defines an absolute majority as ‘the majority of the membership of the House (including the Speaker)’. Between 1950 and 2004 the equivalent standing order to current S.O. 47 required ‘an absolute majority of Members having full voting rights’, which raised doubts as to whether the Speaker should be included in the calculation—see earlier editions (1st to 4th) for discussion.

[440] S.O. 47(c). The requirement for an absolute majority has been suspended for a particular sitting, VP 2004–07/633 (15.9.2005). See VP 2010–13/215–6 (18.11.2010), 473 (24.3.2011) for examples of motion agreed to by a majority but not an absolute majority, and thus not carried.

[441] E.g. VP 1968–69/499 (13.8.1969); VP 1970–72/634 (17.8.1971); VP 2004–07/1702 (13.2.2007).

[442] In the past the bells have been rung to bring sufficient Members into the Chamber as evidence of such concurrence, e.g. H.R. Deb. (4.4.1974) 1070–71, VP 1974/85 (4.4.1974). This practice has not been maintained.

[443] Opinion of Solicitor-General, dated 17 September 1935.

[444] In a letter to the Treasurer, dated 3 April 1962.

[445]Odgers, 14th edn, p. 288.

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