Chapter 6 References


[1]Philip Laundy, The office of Speaker, Cassell, London, 1964, p. 16.

[2]Laundy, The office of Speaker.

[3]George Thomas, ‘The Speakership, House of Commons, Westminster’, The Parliamentarian LIX, 1, 1978, pp. 1–7.

[4]Speaker Snedden, H.R. Deb. (27.5.1976) 2598.

[5]May, 24th edn, p. 59.

[6]The Speaker, Deputy Speaker, Second Deputy Speaker and members of the Speaker’s panel are correctly titled Officers of the House, not office holders, as they are elected by the House or nominated on behalf of the House to serve the interests of the whole House. The distinction is that Ministers, and office holders such as the Leader of the Opposition, whips, etc., may be seen as serving, in the first instance, the interests of a section of the House only. see Ch. on ‘House, Government and Opposition’.

[7]Gazette S21 (17.2.1977); S206 (5.10.1982).

[8]Tradition started by first Labor Speaker (McDonald), H.R. Deb. (13.7.1910) 364.

[9]Philip Laundy, The office of Speaker, Cassell, London, 1964, p. 26.

[10]ibid., p. 30.

[11]For a list of Speakers since 1901 see Appendix 2.

[12]Sir Billy M. Snedden, ‘The Speaker of the Australian House of Representatives’, The Parliamentarian LIX, 4, 1978,
pp. 205–10.

[13]The son of Dr H. A. Jenkins, Speaker from 1983 to 1985.

[14]May, 24th edn, p. 61.

[15]H.R. Deb. (21.4.1983) 5–6.

[16] The reasons for this are in part historical and partly electoral and political. The comparatively small size of the House means that a single seat may be vital in determining a governing majority. For example, after the 1961 and 2016 general elections the Government had a floor majority of only one. After the 2010 election no party or coalition had a majority of Members, and the Government held office with minor party and independent support.

[17]Double dissolution—Correspondence between the late Prime Minister (the Right Honourable Joseph Cook) and His Excellency the Governor-General, PP 2 (1914–17) 3.

[18]VP 1913/4 (9.7.1913).

[19]VP 1901–02/8 (9.5.1901); VP 1904/6 (2.3.1904); VP 1907/4 (20.2.1907). It appears that a second prospective candidate for the Speakership in the 1st Parliament withdrew before the time for the election of Speaker, H.R. Deb. (9.5.1901) 21–2.

[20]H.R. Deb. (28.2.1923) 17–23.

[21]VP 1940–43/4 (20.11.1940).

[22]VP 1940–43/195 (8.10.1941).

[23]VP 1940–43/549 (22.6.1943).

[24]VP 1974–75/1123–7 (11.11.1975).

[25]VP 1976–77/6 (17.2.1976).

[26]VP 2010–13/1137, 1144–5 (24.11.2011).

[27]Constitution, s. 35.

[28]S.O.s 10–12.

[29]S.O. 10(b).

[30]Exceptionally, Speaker Bishop was proposed by the Prime Minister and seconded by the Leader of the House.

[31]In 1909 and 1943 candidates were proposed but declined to accept nomination, see VP 1909/61 (28.7.1909); VP 1940–43/549 (22.6.1943). In 2011, after an initial nomination, 9 additional Members were nominated, but each declined, VP 2010–13/1144–5 (24.11.2011).

[32]About 50% of elections for Speaker have been unopposed.

[33]E.g. VP 1996–98/2754 (4.3.1998) (division held).

[34]H.R. Deb. (24.11.11) 13795.

[35]E.g. VP 2013–16/6–7 (12.11.2013).

[36]The ruling was that the Member could continue. H.R. Deb. (29.8.1989) 471.

[37]H.R. Deb. (16.11.2004) 5.

[38]H.R. Deb. (24.11.2011) 13786.

[39]VP 1909/59 (27.7.1909).

[40]VP 1909/61 (28.7.1909).

[41]VP 1909/62 (28.7.1909).

[42]Then S.O. 6. H.R. Deb. (28.7.1909) 1704.

[43]VP 1909/62 (28.7.1909).

[44]H.R. Deb. (28.7.1909) 1727–8.

[45]VP 1909/67 (29.7.1909).

[46]H.R. Deb. (29.7.1909) 1808–22.

[47]VP 1909/67 (29.7.1909).

[48]Under present standing orders no debate can take place if only one Member is proposed, S.O. 11(f).

[49]VP 1934–37/4–5 (23.10.1934); H.R. Deb. (23.10.1934) 27–8.

[50]S.O. 11(h).

[51]VP 1946–48/5 (6.11.1946); VP 1951–53/5 (12.6.1951); VP 1956–57/5 (15.2.1956); VP 1976–77/6 (17.2.1976); VP 1996–98/2754 (4.3.1998).

[52]H.R. Deb. (15.2.1956) 14.

[53]S.O. 12, e.g. H.R. Deb. (28.9.2010) 11.

[54]E.g. VP 1996–98/2755 (4.3.1998) (occurred); VP 2010–13/1145 (24.11.2011) (did not occur).

[55]VP 1956–57/259 (29.8.1956).

[56]VP 1909/62 (28.7.1909).

[57]VP 1946–48/5 (6.11.1946).

[58]H.R. Deb. (23.10.1934) 30, 31.

[59]VP 2010–13/1145–9 (24.11.2011).

[60]VP 1974–75/1125–7 (11.11.1975). A practice reflected in the famous statement of Speaker Lenthall who is recorded as having said to Charles I who had entered the House of Commons Chamber in 1642: ‘May it please Your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here; and I humbly beg Your Majesty’s pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what Your Majesty is pleased to demand of me’. (A. Wright & P. Smith, Parliaments past and present, London, 1903, p. 40, and N. Wilding and P. Laundy, An encyclopaedia of Parliament, 4th edn, Cassell, London, 1972, p. 430, punctuation taken from the latter.)

[61]Constitution, s. 35.

[62]VP 2002–04/1403 (10.2.2004).

[63]Principal discussion on these matters is found elsewhere in the text.

[64]Constitution, s. 33.

[65]In accordance with the Constitution, s. 42.

[66]Constitution, s. 40.

[67]Constitution, s. 37.

[68]Constitution, ss. 35, 36.

[69]This is symbolised by the practice that the Speaker is not preceded by the Mace when leaving the House during the interval between election and the receipt of the royal approval, see May, 24th edn, p. 151.

[70]S.O. 4(h). The Speaker is preceded by the Serjeant-at-Arms bearing the Mace (at the start of the procession—the Mace is not brought into the presence of the Governor-General).

[71]May, 24th edn, p. 151.

[72]Constitution, s. 49 and specific legislation such as the Parliamentary Privileges Act 1987.

[73]S.O. 5.

[74]The Mace is left, covered, outside the Senate Chamber during the Governor-General’s speech.

[75]At the opening of the 30th Parliament on 17 February 1976 opposition Members did not attend the Senate Chamber to hear the Governor-General’s speech.

[76]S.O. 6(a).

[77]see Ch. on ‘The parliamentary calendar’.

[78]S.O. 7.

[79]See also Ch. on ‘Members’.

[80]Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, s. 204.

[81]Auditor-General Act 1997, ss. 15, 16, 17, 18, 25, 28.

[82]Parliamentary Papers Act 1908, s. 4(2); see also Ch. on ‘Documents’.

[83]Parliamentary Proceedings Broadcasting Act 1946, s. 5(2).

[84]Parliamentary Proceedings Broadcasting Act 1946, s. 7.

[85]E.g. VP 2008–10/615 (16.10.2008).

[86]All of these powers are discussed in detail elsewhere in the text.

[87]Gazette S8 (18.1.1991).

[88]S.O. 32(a).

[89]S.O. 57.

[90]S.O. 95.

[91]S.O. 31.

[92]S.O. 95.

[93]S.O. 4(h).

[94]S.O. 4(i).

[95]S.O. 11(l).

[96]E.g. H.R. Deb. (17.3.1931) 279–80.

[97]E.g. VP 1990–92/1625 (25.6.1992); H.R. Deb. (25.11.2010) 3884.

[98]E.g. VP 2008–10/389 (17.6.2008).

[99]VP 1974–75/25 (11.7.1974).

[100]VP 1974–75/1127 (11.11.1975).

[101]See ‘Access to old evidence and documents’ in Ch. on ‘Committee inquiries’.

[102]S.O. 41(f).

[103] In the House of Commons the Speaker takes no part in debate either in the House or in committee, May, 24th edn, p. 61.

[104]H.R. Deb. (4.6.1942) 2125–6.

[105]H.R. Deb. (1.10.1947) 403.

[106]H.R. Deb. (4.3.1953) 563.

[107]H.R. Deb. (10.10.1905) 3315 (committee); H.R. Deb. (25.10.1932) 1527–9 (committee); H.R. Deb. (4.11.1936) 1504–6 (committee); H.R. Deb. (23.9.1938) 147 (committee); H.R. Deb. (30.4.1948) 1344–6 (House); H.R. Deb. (11.11.1964) 2835 (House); H.R. Deb. (9.9.1975) 1170–72 (committee).

[108]H.R. Deb. (29.3.1944) 2209.

[109]VP 1943–44/119 (29.3.1944).

[110]H.R. Deb. (19.3.1987) 1154–6; H.R. Deb. (19.5.1988) 2692–4.

[111]For a full listing see table in Ch. on ‘Non-government business’.

[112]VP 1998–2001/672–3 (28.6.1999), 898 (27.9.1999).

[113]VP 2013–16/1243 (26.3.2015); VP 2016–18/428 (1.12.2016). On other occasions the motion has been moved by a Minister on behalf of the Speaker, e.g. H.R. Deb. (24.6.2015) 7384.

[114]H.R. Deb. (14.6.1945) 3116, 3119.

[115]H.R. Est. Comm. Deb. (28.8.1980) 16.

[116]Speaker Burke, H.R. Deb. (26.6.2013) 7192.

[117]E.g. H.R. Deb. (21.8.1996) 3346–7; VP 1998–2001/26 (11.11.1998); VP 2008–10/615 (16.10.2008); H.R. Deb. (20.10.2010) 859; VP 2013–16/535 (4.6.2014).

[118]E.g. H.R. Deb. (22.5.1978) 2339; H.R. Deb. (3.12.2008) 12361.

[119]H.R. Deb. (21.5.1901) 76.

[120]H.R. Deb. (30.4.1931) 1491.

[121]VP 1917–19/587 (24.10.1919).

[122]VP 1951–53/387 (27.8.1952), 393 (28.8.1952).

[123]H.R. Deb. (28.8.1952) 692.

[124]H.R. Deb. (24.10.1968) 2292.

[125]H.R. Deb. (14.5.1980) 2693–4.

[126]Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, ss. 8, 71.

[127]E.g. H.R. Deb. (1.4.2004) 28010; H.R. Deb. (27.11.2008) 11744; H.R. Deb. (18.3.2013) 2378.

[128]S.O. 218.

[129]S.O. 222a.

[130]S.O. 222.

[131]S.O. 230. The Act establishing a statutory committee may in some cases exclude the Speaker and Deputy Speaker from membership; this is the case with the Public Works Committee.

[132]VP 1954–55/75 (23.9.1954); H.R. Deb. (23.9.1954) 1534–45.

[133]Constitution, s. 35.

[134]S.O. 19(a). In practice the vacancy may be reported the same day, e.g. VP 1974–75/508 (27.2.1975); VP 2010–13/1144 (24.11.2011).

[135]See also Ch. on ‘The parliamentary calendar’.

[136]S.O. 19(b).

[137]S.O. 10(b).

[138]Constitution, s. 35. For details of specific vacancies see appendix 2.

[139]This has never occurred. A motion to such effect was negated in 2012; however, the Speaker resigned later the same day, VP 2010–13/1838, 1842 (9.10.2012).

[140]Constitution, s. 35; this was the case with Speaker Jenkins, VP 1985–87/665–6 (11.2.1986).

[141]Constitution, s. 36.

[142]S.O. 18(a).

[143]Media release, Office of the Speaker, 22 4.2012. On the next sitting day (8 May) the Speaker resumed his duties as Speaker, although leaving the Deputy Speaker to chair the proceedings of the House (as Deputy rather than as Acting Speaker), see Speaker’s statement in House, H.R. Deb. (8.5.2012) 4127.

[144]Advice of Chief General Counsel, 30 July 2012.

[145]E.g. VP 1978–80/422–3 (27.9.1978), 433 (28.9.1978); VP 1987–90/771 (17.10.1988), 1143 (2.5.1989).

[146]S.O. 18(b).

[147]VP 1920–21/537 (25.5.1921).

[148]Then S.O. 16.

[149]E.g. VP 1948–49/5 (1.9.1948), 289 (26.5.1949); VP 1950–51/195 (11.10.1950).

[150]Constitution, ss. 33, 37.

[151]Constitution, s. 40.

[152]S.O. 3(d).

[153]Opinion of the Solicitor-General, 22 February 1962.

[154]S.O. 135(c).

[155]But see Opinion of Solicitor General dated 22 September 2010 which expressed the view that s. 40 imposed a duty to exercise a casting vote (SG 37 of 2010).

[156]VP 1968–69/375 (19.3.1969), H.R. Deb. (19.3.1969) 698; VP 2010–13/329–330 (22.2.2011); VP 2010–13/1404–5 (8.5.2012).

[157]VP 1998–2001/1936 (30.11.2000).

[158]May, 24th edn, p. 420.

[159]To December 2017.

[160]VP 1901–02/455–6 (12.6.1902).

[161]VP 1914/53 (21.5.2014).

[162]VP 1934–37/480 (3.12.1935).

[163]VP 1962–63/580 (10.10.1963).

[164]VP 1990–92/1438–9 (29.4.1992).

[165]VP 2010–13/1590 (20.6.2012).

[166]VP 2016–18/89 (1.9.2016); VP 2016–18/ 841 (15.6.2017).

[167]VP 1990–92/803–5 (30.5.1991).

[168]VP 1929/17–18 (13.2.1929).

[169]VP 1940–43/450 (11.12.1942); H.R. Deb. (11.12.1942) 1824.

[170]That is, continue on the third reading. However, during that debate standing orders were suspended pursuant to standing order 132 to permit the House to divide again—the question on the second reading was then agreed to and the exercise of the casting vote was superseded, VP 2010–13/299–300 (10.2.2011).

[171]VP 2010–13/1548 (31.5.2012).

[172]VP 2010–13/ 1950–51 (1.11.2012).

[173]VP 1913/43–4 (4.9.1913).

[174]VP 1913/149–50 (7.11.1913).

[175]VP 1913/151 (11.11.1913).

[176]VP 1914/31 (6.5.1914).

[177]VP 1914/39–40 (13.5.1914).

[178]VP 1914/41 (13.5.1914).

[179]VP 1914/41–2 (13.5.1914).

[180]VP 1914/48 (21.5.1914).

[181]VP 1914/61 (28.5.1914).

[182]VP 1937–40/87 (10.5.1938).

[183]VP 1929–31/593 (24.4.1931).

[184]VP 1970–72/1018–19 (19.4.1972).

[185]VP 2010–13/205–6 (18.11.2010); VP 2010–13/846 (25.8.2011). In both cases the amendment had attempted to include an additional item of private Members’ business.

[186]VP 2010–13/635 (15.6.2011).

[187]VP 2010–13/1342 (19.3.2012).

[188]VP 2010–13/1793 (17.9.2012).

[189]VP 2010–13/1490 (24.5.2012), 1599 (21.6.2012), 2147–8 (14.3.2013), 2390 (6.6.2013).

[190]VP 2010–13/1694–5 (16.8.2012).

[191]VP 2016–18/1274 (6.12.2017).

[192]S.O. 14(d)(e).

[193]Except that the Speaker (and Deputy Speaker) may make a constituency statement under S.O. 193; e.g. H.R. Deb. (26.6.2013) 7192 (first time).

[194]For a more detailed history of the development of the Standing Orders see ‘Rules and Orders’in G. S. Reid and M. Forrest, Australia’s Commonwealth Parliament 1901–1988: ten perspectives, Melbourne University Press, 1989, pp. 132–83.

[195] Standing Committee on Procedure, Revised standing orders, PP 394 (2003).

[196]Standing Committee on Procedure, It’s your House: Community involvement in the procedures and practices of the House of Representatives and its committees, PP 363 (1999).

[197]VP 2002–04/1744 (24.6.2004).

[198]Former S.O. 1.

[199]H.R. Deb. (10.3.2004) 26438–9.

[200]May, 24th edn, p. 62.

[201]Odgers, 14th edn, p. 152.

[202]In the House of Commons it is usual for the Speaker to hear points of order after Question Time instead of during that period, see May, 24th edn, p. 455.

[203]E.g. H.R. Deb. (31.8.1999) 9454–6; H.R. Deb. (29.6.2000) 18719.

[204]E.g.H.R. Deb. (18.6.2009) 6582; H.R. Deb. (23.6.2009) 6855; H.R. Deb. (11.3.2010) 2283, 2305 (Speaker said he had had regard to the number of occasions on which he had disciplined the Member in relation to points of order); H.R. Deb. (22.2.2011) 912–4; H.R. Deb. (12.8.2015) 8104; H.R. Deb. (11.11.2015) 12879–80.

[205]E.g. H.R. Deb. (28.5.2009) 4761; H.R. Deb. (23.6.2009) 6855.

[206]H.R. Deb. (20.9.2007) 93–4.

[207]E.g. VP 1996–98/195 (29.5.1996), 1871 (27.8.1997), 2461 (18.11.1997); H.R. Deb. (17.2.2005) 101; VP 2008–10/111 (21.2.2008), 1065 (28.5.2009); VP 2013–16/879 (2.10.2014).

[208]VP 2010–13/928 (20.9.2011).

[209]E.g. VP 1974–75/958 (9.10.1975); VP 1993–96/1602 (17.11.1994); VP 1996–98/2065 (30.9.1997).

[210]S.O. 1. The specific provision has applied since 2006; previously the limits for debates not otherwise provided for applied, mover 20 mins, others 15 mins (now 15 and 10 mins).

[211]VP 1950–51/27 (9.3.1950); VP 1951–53/65–6 (10.7.1951). A dissent motion has been moved following a statement by the Speaker in which he responded to queries arising from a decision he had made at an earlier sitting, H.R. Deb. (27.5.2003) 15039–15056.

[212]VP 1951–53/505 (21.10.1952).

[213]H.R. Deb. (30.9.1954) 1774.

[214]H.R. Deb. (25.11.1953) 530; H.R. Deb. (26.11.1953) 553–4.

[215]VP 1912/13 (21.6.1912); VP 1974–75/441–2 (11.2.1975).

[216]VP 1971/543 (23.4.1971). Leave to withdraw a motion has however been refused, VP 1954–55/330 (6.10.1955).

[217]H.R. Deb. (9.3.1950) 585.

[218]H.R. Deb. (1.6.1977) 2281.

[219]VP 1954–55/221 (24.5.1955), 265–6 (9.6.1955).

[220]H.R. Deb. (3.4.2000) 15091–3. (The call can be challenged by the motion that another Member who had risen ‘be heard now’.)

[221]H.R. Deb. (19.9.2007) 78.

[222]H.R. Deb. (15.3.2000) 14783–7.

[223]VP 1978–80/572 (21.11.1978).

[224]E.g. VP 2002–04/970–2 (18.6.2003); VP 2013–16/205–6 (10.12.2013).

[225]H.R. Deb. (27.5.2003) 15053.

[226]VP 1920–21/218 (23.7.1920), 221–2 (28.7.1920), H.R. Deb. (28.7.1920) 3018–23; VP 1937/106–7(10.9.1937), H.R. Deb. (10.9.1937) 954; VP 1951–53/595 (6.3.1953), H.R. Deb. (6.3.1953) 669–74; VP 1951–53/714 (8.10.1953), H.R. Deb. (8.10.1953) 1169–70; VP 1953–54/65 (2.12.1953), H.R. Deb. (2.12.1953) 769–80; VP 1954–55/184–5 (3–4.5.1955), H.R. Deb. (4.5.1955) 362–73; VP 1954–55/201 (12.5.1955), H.R. Deb. (12.5.1955) 671–3.

[227]H.R. Deb. (13.5.1914) 895–6.

[228]VP 1929–31/492 (17.3.1931); H.R. Deb. (17.3.1931) 279.

[229]VP 1962–63/55 (7.3.1962).

[230]H.R. Deb. (7.3.1962) 552.

[231]VP 2002–04/358–9 (26.8.2002).

[232]Philip Laundy, The office of Speaker, Cassell, London, 1964, p. 36.

[233]Standing Committee on Procedure, The standing orders and practices which govern the conduct of Question Time, PP 354 (1986).

[234]VP 1907–08/384–5 (22.4.1908); H.R. Deb. (22.4.1908) 10485–7.

[235]See Ch. on ‘Senate amendments and requests’.

[236]H.R. Deb. (10.6.1999) 6727–33, and see ‘Challenges to membership—s. 44(v) of the Constitution’ in Ch. on ‘Members’.

[237]H.R. Deb. (13.10.1999) 11492–510.

[238]H.R. Deb. (13.6.1901) 1075.

[239]H.R. Deb. (3.9.1912) 2874; H.R. Deb. (23.7.1915) 5340.

[240]H.R. Deb. (12.11.1915) 7649.

[241]NP 15 (10.4.1973) 511; VP 1973–74/121 (12.4.1973, item 10); H.R. Deb. (12.4.1973) 1396.

[242]H.R. Deb. (20.5.1920) 2383; H.R. Deb. (29.3.1944) 2203–24.

[243]H.R. Deb. (25.5.1950) 3279–80.

[244]see H.R. Deb. (31.5.1950) 3454–62; H.R. Deb. (1.6.1950) 3577–87, 3653–5.

[245]VP 2013–16/485 (26.5.2014).

[246]VP 2013–16/497, 498–500 (27.5.2014); H.R. Deb. (27.5.2014) 4344, 4363­­81.

[247]May, 24th edn, pp. 61, 263.

[248]Division name changed from Ballaarat to Ballarat in 1977. Before 1977 Hansard sometimes incorrectly recorded ‘Ballarat’.

[249]VP 1913/151–3 (11.11.1913); H.R. Deb. (11.11.1913) 2982–3053.

[250]VP 1914–17/181 (29.4.1915); H.R. Deb. (29.4.1915) 2729–49.

[251]H.R. Deb. (22.8.1986) 529, 558–9; H.R. Deb. (16.9.1986) 701–5; VP 1985–87/1089, 1090 (22.8.1986), 1102 (16.9.1986).

[252]VP 1985–87/1467–8 (24.2.1987); H.R. Deb. (24.2.1987) 573, 580–7.

[253]VP 1985–87/1591 (28.4.1987); H.R. Deb. (28.4.1987) 2059. On 26 April 1988 Speaker Child mentioned criticisms attributed to a Member (Mr Downer). She rejected the criticisms and said such comments did harm to the institution but said she did not intend to take the matter further—H.R. Deb. (26.4.1988) 2045.

[254] VP 1990–92/223–4 (9.10.1990).

[255]H.R. Deb. (30.11.2005) 78; H.R. Deb. (5.12.2005) 46; H.R. Deb. (8.12.2005) 70.

[256]H.R. Deb. (27.2.1975) 824–9.

[257]VP 1974–75/502–3 (27.2.1975); Constitution, s. 35.

[258]VP 1974–75/508–9 (27.2.1975).

[259]VP 1937–40/223 (14.10.1938); H.R. Deb. (14.10.1938) 862.

[260]VP 2010–13/584 (31.5.2011), H.R. Deb. (31.5.2011) 5284–6.

[261]Where certain legislation, such as the Public Works Committee Act, continued to refer to the Chairman of Committees, such provisions applied to the position of Deputy Speaker.

[262]S.O. 16(b).

[263]S.O. 13. For a list of Chairmen of Committees/Deputy Speakers since 1901 see Appendix 3.

[264]The election procedures of S.O. 11 are qualified by S.O. 14 for this purpose.

[265]As described for the ballot for Speaker at page 171.

[266]At the start of the 43rd Parliament an opposition Member, nominated by a government Member, was elected as Deputy Speaker and another opposition Member, nominated by an opposition Member, was elected as Second Deputy Speaker.

[267]In 1978 a former Chairman and a government Member from the National Country Party, Mr Lucock, was nominated by the Opposition, VP 1978–80/10 (21.2.1978). Mr Lucock was not present at the time, but signified his availability by telegram—the standing orders not requiring acceptance of nomination to be given.

[268]VP 1940–43/549 (22.6.1943).

[269]VP 1940–43/308 (26.3.1942), 313 (29.4.1942), 349 (21.5.1942), 473 (11.2.1943), 478 (16.2.1943).

[270]VP 1940–43/551 (22.6.1943).

[271]S.O. 18(a).

[272]S.O. 16(b). On 8 May 2012 a period commenced when Speaker Slipper did not preside during meetings of the House and Deputy Speaker Burke took the Chair for all periods during which the Speaker would have presided, see statement by the Speaker, H.R. Deb. (8.5.2012).

[273]S. Deb. (24.9.1906) 5165.

[274]S.O.s 16(c), 17(b).

[275]S.O.s 16(c), 18(a).

[276]See VP 1951–53/367 (6.8.1952) (before present offices were created).

[277]The Constitution and the standing orders of the House contain no specific provision on the matter.

[278]VP 1940–43/549–50 (22.6.1943); VP 1961/9 (8.3.1961).

[279]VP 1974–75/821 (19.8.1975).

[280]Parliamentary Presiding Officers Act 1965.

[281]S.O. 16(c).

[282]S.O. 18(a); e.g. VP 1993–96/2189 (20.6.1995); VP 1996–98/929 (2.12.1996).

[283]S.O. 16(c).

[284]Standing Committee on Procedure, About time: bills, questions and working hours. PP 194 (1993) 19–20.

[285]H. R. Deb. (8.2.1994) 541.

[286]VP 1993–96/842 (3.3.1994).

[287]S.O. 13(c). This provision was omitted from 10.10.2012; reinstated 13.11.2013.

[288]S.O. 14.

[289]S.O. 14(b). The standing order allows the position to be left unfilled.

[290] Formerly, Members were nominated as Deputy Chairmen, or earlier, as Temporary Chairmen, see earlier editions for more historical detail.

[291] S.O. 17(a).

[292]S.O. 17(b)(c).

[293]In the 45th Parliament there were 13 members.

[294]Later, non-aligned Members were also appointed, VP 2010–13/1244 (16.2.2012).

[295]In 1958 Speaker McLeay nominated a member of the opposition executive (Mr Webb) as a Temporary Chairman, VP 1958/13 (11.3.1958).

[296]E.g. Mr T.W. White, 8 March 1933; Mr K. Beazley removed in 2005 after being elected Leader of the Opposition, as announced to House 8.2.2005. In 2015 the Speaker presented a warrant revoking the nominations of newly appointed Parliamentary Secretaries, VP 2013–16/1071 (9.2.2015).

[297]E.g. H.R. Deb. (8.7.1915) 4723; H.R. Deb. (18.9.1986) 1010 and see H.R. Deb. (14.3.1991) 2054.

[298]Philip Marsden, The officers of the Commons 1363–1978, 2nd edn, HMSO, London, 1979, p. 15.

[299]Before the commencement of this Act parliamentary staff were employed pursuant to specific sections of the Public Service Act 1922.

[300]Parliamentary Service Act 1999, s. 3.

[301]These are separate offices from those of Public Service Commissioner and Public Service Merit Protection Commissioner, but in practice have been held by the same persons. While the objectives of the Act were not updated, from 2011 the Act has also defined the powers and responsibilities of the Parliamentary Budget Officer.

[302]Parliamentary Service Act 1999, s. 10.

[303]See Appendix 5.

[304]S.O.s 27, 28.

[305]VP 1926–28/354 (28.9.1927).

[306]VP 1926–28/359 (28.9.1927).

[307]E.g. VP 2004–07/127 (9.12.2004).

[308]Parliamentary Service Act 1999, s. 58 (3).

[309]Parliamentary Service Act 1999, s. 58 (2).

[310]Parliamentary Service Act 1999, s. 58 (4).

[311]See J 1908/2 (16.9.1908). The question of title later became an issue in respect of the Clerk of the House in 1920 when a recommendation by the Speaker for him to use the title was not pursued as it met with some opposition.

[312]VP 1993–96/1759 (31.1.1995); H.R. Deb. (31.1.1995) 1. Party leaders were consulted about the proposed change. Although there was not unanimity, the Speaker directed that the change proceed.

[313]The Clerk’s role in these matters is discussed in detail throughout the text.

[314]Constitution, s. 49.

[315]S.O. 21.

[316]S.O. 22.

[317]S.O. 94(f).

[318]S.O. 96. If a person is taken into custody the Speaker must report this to the House without delay.

[319]In accordance with resolutions passed by each House (VP 2002–04/1079 (14.8.2003), 1092 (19.8.2003)), pursuant to s. 54 of the Parliamentary Service Act 1999.

[320]Parliamentary Service Amendment (Parliamentary Budget Officer) Act 2011.

[321]Functions as outlined in the Minister’s second reading speech, H.R. Deb. (24.8.2011) 9141–2.

[322]See ‘House Committee’ in Ch. on ‘Parliamentary committees’.

[323]See ‘Joint Standing Committee on the Parliamentary Library’ in Ch. on ‘Parliamentary committees’.

[324]Or other DPS employee nominated by the Presiding Officers.

[325]Established pursuant to s. 65A of the Parliamentary Service Act 1999. See also ‘The security of the parliamentary precincts’ in Ch. on ‘Parliament House and access to proceedings’.

[326]S.O. 222a.

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