Chapter 4 References


[1]Constitution, s. 125. VP 1901–02/1–9 (9.5.1901).

[2]The two Houses met in Melbourne again on 9 and 10 May 2001 to mark the centenary of the first meetings: resolutions of House, VP 1998–2001/1576 (26.6.2000), 2104 (27.2.2001); joint meeting with Senate in Exhibition Building, VP 1998–2001/2259–60 (9.5.2001); sitting of House in Victorian Legislative Assembly Chamber, VP 1998–2001/2261–2 (10.5.2001).

[3]Between December 1902 and April 1903 the State Parliament met in Parliament House while the Commonwealth Parliament was prorogued.

[4]Approx. 161 km.

[5]Seat of Government Act 1908. The Act repealed the Seat of Government Act 1904 which had determined an area near Dalgety. This choice however proved to be unacceptable to the Government of New South Wales and the matter was reconsidered. The results of the final ballots in each House were influenced by the State Government’s indicated willingness to cede land in the Yass–Canberra district. H.R. Deb. (8.10.1908) 936–40; S. Deb. (6.11.1908) 2100–8. The land was ceded by the Seat of Government Surrender Act 1909 (NSW).

[6]By proclamation of the Governor-General pursuant to the Seat of Government Acceptance Act 1909. The agreement was later varied (to correct an error and make a survey adjustment) by the Seat of Government Acceptance Act 1922.

[7] VP 1923–24/74 (12.7.1923); H.R. Deb. (28.6.1923) 460–85, (12.7.1923) 1048–61.

[8] VP 1923–24/96 (26.7.1923); H.R. Deb. (26.7.1923) 1668–78.

[9] VP 1977/98 (3.5.1977); H.R. Deb. (3.5.1977) 1445–6; PP 69 (1977).

[10] VP 1978–80/1604 (28.8.1980); H.R. Deb. (28–29.8.1980) 970–1.

[11] More detail on the site, design, construction and layout of the building is given in earlier editions (4th edn, pp. 106–8).

[12] J. M. Davies, ‘Red and Green’, The Table XXXVII, 1968, pp. 33–40.The article argues that green appears to have been the predominant colour in the decoration of the Palace of Westminster when it was constructed in the 13th century, including the locations where the House of Commons was to later meet. The choice of red specifically for the chamber where the Lords met was a later development.

[13] The original Speaker’s Chair, described in detail in the first edition, remained in its place in the provisional building.

[14] S.O. 54.

[15] S.O.s 129(a), 136(b).

[16] S.O. 131(a).

[17] S.O. 56(a).

[18] S.O. 1 (time limits for speeches).

[19] Proceedings are broadcast on radio, television and the internet.

[20]See ‘Electronic voting’ in Chapter on ‘Order of business and the sitting day’.

[21] VP 1926–28/349 (9.5.1927).

[22] For a detailed description of the House of Representatives’ Mace and the history of its use see A. R. Browning, The Mace. AGPS, Canberra, 1970.

[23] Speakers McDonald and Makin (the latter declaring the Mace ‘a relic of barbarism’), see Browning, The Mace, pp. 6–7.

[24] S.O. 12(c).

[25]H.R. Deb. (29.11.1951) 3091.

[26] Browning, The Mace, p. 12.

[27] Senators have been seated in the seats reserved for officials, e.g. H.R. Deb. (16.12.1992) 3919–20.

[28] S.O. 23.

[29] S.O. 24(b). H.R. Deb. (30.8.2000) 19666–7.

[30] S.O. 2. The definition is relevant to the location of Members during divisions—Members must be within the defined area for their vote to be counted, and if calling for the division must remain within that area (S.O.s 128, 129).

[31] S.O. 255(b).

[32] VP 1954–55/269–71 (10.6.1955). For full details of this case see Ch. on ‘Parliamentary privilege’.

[33] H.R. Deb. (10.6.1955) 1625.

[34] H.R. Deb. (2.12.1921) 13585.

[35] VP 1967–68/308 (8.11.1967); VP 1970–72/465 (9.3.1971).

[36]See Odgers, 6th edn, pp. 817–8, 878–9, 850–4.

[37] H.R. Deb. (14.5.1952) 324; H.R. Deb. (21.4.1955) 79; H.R. Deb. (14.5.1969) 1748; H.R. Deb. (6.4.2000) 15453; H.R. Deb. (27.5.2003) 15038; H.R. Deb. (1.4.2004) 27990–91; H.R. Deb. (15.9.2005) 80. And see ‘Disorder and disturbances’ at p. 128.

[38] H.R. Deb. (20.5.1975) 2513.

[39] H.R. Deb. (15.9.2005) 80–1.

[40] N. Wilding and P. Laundy, An encyclopaedia of Parliament, 4th edn, Cassell, London, 1972, p. 729.

[41] S.O. 257(d).

[42] S.O. 257(a).

[43] S.O. 257(b).

[44] E.g. H.R. Deb. (16.2.2012) 1657–8.

[45] H.R. Deb. (5.2.2013) 10.

[46] S.O. 96(a).

[47] S.O. 96(b).

[48] H.R. Deb. (29.7.1920) 3078–9.

[49] Pursuant to former S.O. 314.

[50] S.O. 66(d).

[51] VP 1940–43/72 (12.12.1940), 123 (29.5.1941), 166 (20.8.1941); H.R. Deb. (29.5.1941) 55; H.R. Deb. (20.8.1941) 11–12.

[52] VP 1940–43/72 (12.12.1940).

[53] VP 1940–43/166 (20.8.1941); H.R. Deb. (20.8.1941) 12–14.

[54] VP 1940–43/275 (20.2.1942), 393 (3.9.1942), 441 (8.10.1942).

[55] S.O. 257(c).

[56] VP 1920–21/163 (13.5.1920).

[57] Standing Orders Committee, Report, PP 63 (1974) 5–6.

[58] VP 1980–83/748 (25.2.1982).

[59] PP 354 (1986) 25.

[60] S.O. 257(a), e.g. VP 1970–72/31 (11.3.1970); VP 2002–04/1653 (1.6.2004).

[61] VP 1926–28/512 (15.3.1928).

[62] H.R. Deb. (7.11.1973) 2882; H.R. Deb. (29.11.1973) 4081.

[63] General D. MacArthur is sometimes reported as having addressed the House during World War II. However, while he was invited to take a seat on the floor of the House, VP 1940–43/307 (26.3.42), his address to members of the Parliament occurred outside the Chamber (on the same day in the parliamentary dining room).

[64] VP 1951–53/242 (29.11.1951); H.R. Deb. (29.11.1951) 3088–93.

[65] For details see ‘Addresses to both Houses by foreign heads of state’ in Ch. on ‘Order of business and the sitting day’.

[66] Lord Campion, An introduction to the procedure of the House of Commons, 3rd edn, Macmillan, London, 1958, p. 96; see also A. Wright and P. Smith, Parliament past and present, Hutchinson, London, 1903, pp. 221–30.

[67]Rules for media related activity in Parliament House and its precincts, November 2016.

[68] H.R. Deb. (14.5.1980) 2694.

[69] H.R. Deb. (23.4.1931) 1274; J 1940–43/211 (2.6.1942); H.R. Deb. (3.6.1942) 2187; H.R. Deb. (29.5.1973) 2738.

[70] VP 1970–72/465, 467 (9.3.1971); H.R. Deb. (9.3.1971) 687, 689–92, 739.

[71] Formerly the Parliamentary and News Network (PNN), now called NewsRadio.

[72] Although the House in 1991, VP 1990–93/1084–5 (16.10.1991), declared in principle support for the amendment of the Parliamentary Proceedings Broadcasting Act 1946 to make statutory provision for televising, no legislative action was taken.

[73] Access was originally for a trial period, VP 1990–93/491–2 (12.2.1991); continuing approval, VP 1990–93/1084–5 (16.10.1991); conditions amended, VP 1993–96/387–9 (20.10.1993).

[74] The in-house television and radio distribution systems previously known as the House Monitoring Service.

[75] Accessible through the Parliament’s web site www.aph.gov.au. The ParlView service provides access to archived parliamentary audio-visual records.

[76] A-PAC is funded by pay television networks.

[77] Or rebroadcast later at night on those days when Senate Question Time is televised live.

[78] VP 2013–16/182–3 (9.12.2013). The resolution consolidated earlier rules, replacing several related resolutions dating back to 1988.

[79]Rules for media related activity in Parliament House and its precincts, November 2016.

[80] H.R. Deb. (16.2.2004) 24758, VP 2002–04/1432 (16.2.2004).

[81]See ‘Use of electronic devices’ in Chapter on ‘Members’.

[82] ParlTV has audio coverage of those hearings that are not televised.

[83] Currently transmitted nationally by A-PAC.

[84]Rules for media related activity in Parliament House and its precincts, November 2016.

[85] VP 1976–77/77–8 (18.3.1976); H.R. Deb. (18.3.1976) 781–2; J 1976–77/74–5 (18.3.1976).

[86]See also Committee of Privileges, Advertisement in the Canberra Times and other Australian newspapers on 18th August, 1965, PP 210 (1964–66).

[87] @AboutTheHouse.

[88]www.youtube.com/user/athnews.

[89]Broadcast on A-PAC (Australia’s Public Affairs Channel).

[90]House of Representatives Infosheets www.aph.gov.au/infosheets.

[91]House of Representatives—Guide to procedures, 6th edn, Canberra, Department of the House of Representatives, 2017, www.aph.gov.au/gtp.

[92]www.aph.gov.au/house

[93] The draft record of the proceedings of the House of Representatives as they occur (subject to revision).

[94]www.peo.gov.au

[95] The main provisions commenced, by proclamation, on 1 August 1988.

[96]The Parliamentary Precincts Regulations 2011 provide the mechanism for this, allowing the legal framework for the control and management of the parliamentary precincts to be quickly applied to an alternative location in the event that Parliament House is unavailable.

[97]Parliament Act 1974, s. 5. E.g. VP 2002–04/420 (19.9.2002). Within the zone, the Presiding Officers are responsible for works inside the parliamentary precincts, and in these cases the relevant approval motion is moved in the House by the Speaker, VP 2013–16/1243 (26.3.2015); VP 2016–18/428 (1.12.2016), or by a Minister on the Speaker’s behalf, e.g. see H.R. Deb. (13.8.2009) 7765; H.R. Deb. (24.6.2015) 7384.

[98] See map at Schedule 3 of the Parliamentary Precincts Act.

[99]Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988, s. 12.

[100] For discussion of the respective roles of the Authority and the committee see Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories, The way forward: inquiry into the role of the National Capital Authority, 2008.

[101]See Rees v. McCay [1975] 7 ACT R7.

[102] H.R. Deb. (28.8.1952) 692; see also Ch. on ‘The Speaker, Deputy Speakers and officers’.

[103] PP 22 (1978).

[104] Established pursuant to s. 65A of the Parliamentary Service Act 1999.

[105] H.R. Deb. (11.2.2003) 11432–3.

[106] S.O. 96.

[107] S.O. 96(a). In practice parliamentary security staff perform this function under the overall direction of the Serjeant-at-Arms.

[108] On occasion, proceedings have been suspended while demonstrators have been removed from the public galleries: H.R. Deb. (14.7.1920) 2683; H.R. Deb. (11.6.1970) 3361; H.R. Deb. (7.9.1971) 853; H.R. Deb. (30.11.2016) 4945. Other significant or unusual recorded incidents when the House has been disturbed, and the action taken by the Chair, were summarised at page 128 of the 4th edition.

[109] H.R. Deb. (19.11.1965) 2989.

[110] Advice of Attorney-General’s Department, concerning powers of police within the precincts of Parliament House, 1967; and opinion of Solicitor-General, dated 30 September 1926.

[111]Advice of Attorney-General’s Department, concerning powers of police within the precincts of Parliament House, 1967. And see Parliamentary Precincts Act 1988.

[112] VP 1978–80/1662 (16.9.1980); H.R. Deb. (16.9.1980) 1293.

[113]And see Crane v. Gething (2000) FCA 4.

[114]See ‘Execution of search warrants where parliamentary privilege may be involved’ in Chapter on ‘Parliamentary Privilege’.

[115] H.R. Deb. (2.3.1989) 328–9.

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