Chapter 18 References


[1] However, joint committees operate under Senate procedures when the procedures of the two Houses differ, see p. 648. Any instruction to a joint committee can only be effected by resolution agreed to by both Houses. This should be remembered when reference is made in this chapter to resolutions affecting committees and to the responsibility of committees to report. Unless otherwise indicated it can be assumed that in any instance in which the House would be involved in the case of House committees, both Houses would be involved in the case of joint committees. Further, where the Speaker may be required to be involved, the President may also be involved where joint committees are concerned. For a list of committees since 1901 see Appendix 24.

[2] The term ‘committee’ originally signified an individual (i.e. to whom a bill had been committed). Lord Campion, An introduction to the procedure of the House of Commons, 3rd edn, Macmillan, London, 1958, p. 26.

[3]Parliamentary committees: powers over and protection afforded to witnesses, Paper prepared by I. J. Greenwood and R. J. Ellicott, PP 168 (1972) 3.

[4]May, 23rd edn, p. 794.

[5] For history of the use of the term ‘standing committee’ in the House of Commons, and recommendation that it be discontinued, see Select Committee on Modernisation of the House of Commons, First report: The legislative process, HC 1097(2005–06), paras 63–6.

[6]May, 24th edn, p. 859.

[7] Nine from 1996; thirteen from 2002; twelve from 2008; nine from 2010 following a Procedure Committee recommendation to reduce the number of committees—see Standing Committee on Procedure, Building a modern committee system: an inquiry into the effectiveness of the House committee system, PP 144 (2010) 80–85; ten from 2015; eleven from 2016.

[8] The Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit must be notified in writing of any inquiry into an Auditor-General’s report—S.O. 215(c)(iv).

[9] S.O. 215(c).

[10] VP 1978–80/975 (11.9.1979); VP 1993–96/1107 (27.6.1994); VP 1998–2001/483 (31.3.1999).

[11]But see report by Joint House Committee on accommodation for Members of Parliament at Canberra, VP 1926–28/181 (16.6.1926); see also reports by the Senate House Committee concerning Senators’ dress in the Senate Chamber, PP 235 (1971), and provision of staff and other facilities for Members of Parliament, PP 34 (1972), and the Joint House Department.

[12] Senate standing orders (and former House standing orders) use the term ‘ordered to be printed’ instead of ‘ordered to be made a Parliamentary Paper’—the two terms may be treated as synonymous.

[13] Standing Committee on Procedure, 10 years on: A review of the House of Representatives committee system, May 1998.

[14] Standing Committee on Procedure, Revised standing orders, November 2003.

[15] S.O. 222.

[16] S.O. 223.

[17] S.O. 223.

[18] E.g. Select Committees on Pharmaceutical Benefits, VP 1970–72/304 (16.9.1970); Road Safety, VP 1970–72/1030 (27.4.1972); and on Tourism, VP 1976–77/510 (1.12.1976).

[19] S.O. 243.

[20] The Select Committees on Aboriginal Education and Aircraft Noise had power to report from time to time, VP 1985–87/59–60 (27.2.1985).

[21] Select Committee on Recent Australian Bushfires, VP 2002–04/833 (26.3.2003).

[22] Select Committee on Specific Learning Difficulties, VP 1976–77/273 (19.8.1976); Joint Select Committee on an Australia Card, VP 1985–87/764 (14.3.1986), 886 (29.4.1986); Joint Select Committee on Certain Family Law Issues, VP 1993–96/2058 (11.5.1995).

[23] Joint Select Committees on Aboriginal Land Rights in the Northern Territory (VP 1977/12 (10.3.1977) and on the Family Law Act (VP 1978–80/354–5 (17.8.1978)).

[24] S.O. 238.

[25] Former S.O. 350.

[26] Senate S.O. 40.

[27] Senate standing orders 21 and 22 provide for these committees to confer and sit as a joint committee with a similar committee of the House of Representatives.

[28] VP 1907–08/299 (1.4.1908), 302 (2.4.1908), 505 (29.5.1908), 515–6 (4.6.1908); see also VP 1907–08/370 (2.4.1908) for order of the House giving extended power to its members on the committee.

[29] VP 1993–96/1165 (30.6.1994).

[30] J 1993–96/1677 (12.5.1994). Note that the Senate standing orders on this matter changed in 1994.

[31] PP 307 (1995).

[32] VP 1987–90/155 (27.10.1987).

[33] VP 1987–90/181 (2.11.1987).

[34] For details see VP 1987–90/203–4 (4.11.1987), 212 (5.11.1987).

[35] E.g. VP 1993–96/80, 82 (13.5.1993); VP 1998–2001/164, 166 (3.12.1998); VP 2008–10/31–4 (12.2.2008).

[36] This practice is based on that of the United Kingdom whereby joint committees follow House of Lords select committee procedures, unless otherwise agreed, May, 24th edn, p. 914.

[37] VP 2013–16/120 (21.11.2013). The separate Senate and House of Representatives Library Committees were discontinued.

[38] Formerly Joint Committee of Public Accounts.

[39]Parliamentary Service Act 1999, ss. 64Q, 64R, 64S, 64T, 64XA.

[40] Pursuant to the Auditor-General Act 1997, s. 53 and Parliamentary Service Act 1999, s. 64R; e.g. H.R. Deb.(3.5.2016) 4245–6.

[41] This replaced the Finance Minute previously prepared by the Department of Finance and Administration in response to all the committee’s reports.

[42] E.g. VP 1993–96/1145 (29.6.1994), 1327 (22.9.1994), 2678 (30.11.1995); VP 1996–98/266 (19.6.1996), 389 (22.8.1996).

[43] But in practice the motion is moved in the House of Representatives, e.g. VP 2002–04/1336 (27.11.2003).

[44] E.g. VP 2002–04/1319 (25.11.2003); VP 2004–07/2085 (16.8.2007) (2); VP 2010–13/240 (24.11.2010), 2503 (27.6.2013).

[45] VP 1987–90/985 (1.12.1988); VP 1998–2001/1140 (8.12.1999).

[46] VP 1922/93 (25.8.1922) (on notice); VP 1974–75/521 (4.3.1975) (by leave); VP 1976–77/389 (12.10.1976) (on notice); VP 2002–04/1748 (24.6.2004) (by leave—combined rescission and expediency motion). See S.O. 120 and ‘Resolution or vote of the House rescinded or varied’ in Chapter on ‘Motions’.

[47] Replaced the Parliamentary Joint Committee on the Australian Crime Commission on 25.11.2010.

[48] E.g. VP 1998–2001/164–74 (3.12.1998); VP 2010–13/47–58 (29.9.2010). The Select Committee on Specific Learning Difficulties was appointed on motion moved by the Leader of the Opposition, VP 1974–75/286 (31.10.1974). see also VP 1970–72/147–8 (14.5.1970); VP 1962–63/549 (12.9.1963).

[49] E.g. VP 1998–2001/164 (3.12.1998); VP 2008–10/31–2 (12.2.2008).

[50] VP 1987–90/150 (26.10.1987). In 2004, at the commencement of the 41st Parliament, the Senate sent the House a message seeking modifications in respect of the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Corporations and Financial Services. However, in a later message it agreed to the original terms, VP 2004–07/46 (29.11.2004), 65 (1.12.2004).

[51] VP 1974–75/828–9 (19.8.1975), 870 (26.8.1975).

[52] VP 1973–74/139 (2.5.1973), 149 (3.5.1973).

[53] In 1973 a Joint Committee on Environment and Conservation was proposed by the House, rejected by the Senate, and a House Standing Committee on Environment and Conservation established, VP 1973–74/124–5 (12.4.1973), 247 (30.5.1973); J 1973–74/216.

[54] E.g. the resolution of appointment of the Joint Select Committee on Northern Australia was amended to give it a continuing monitoring role and the ability to (further) report from time to time, VP 2013–16/761 (27.8.2014); that of the Joint Select Committee on Gambling Reform included that the committee inquire into and report on ‘Such other matters relating to gambling referred by either House’, VP 2010–13/52 (29.9.2010).

[55] Since 3.12.1998 (former S.O. 341).

[56] The effect of the motion of referral is considered to cease on prorogation. E.g. Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs: initial reference, VP 1976–77/512 (1.12.1976); re-referred, VP 1977/13 (10.3.1977). Committee of Privileges: initial reference, VP 1973–74/619 (6.12.1973); re-referred, VP 1974/34 (7.3.1974).

[57]See VP 1977/10–11 (10.3.1977), 16 (15.3.1977), for the re-appointment of the Select Committee on Tourism, and VP 1977/12 (10.3.1977), 16 (15.3.1977), for the re-appointment of the Joint Select Committee on Aboriginal Land Rights in the Northern Territory.

[58] This meant, for example, that the Public Works Committee was able to report in the second session of the 44th Parliament on inquiries into works referred during the first session, without the works having to be re-referred by the House.

[59]May, 24th edn, p. 145.

[60]May, 24th edn, p. 835. Since 1975 the House of Commons has adopted the practice of appointing the members of many of its committees for the life of the Parliament but they may not meet after prorogation, ‘Dissolution and prorogation: answers to questionnaire’, The Table XLIII, 1975, p. 76.

[61] Josef Redlich, The procedure of the House of Commons, vol. II, Archibald Constable, London, 1908, p. 196.

[62] VP 1959–60/25 (25.2.1959).

[63] VP 1956–57/368–9 (8.11.1956).

[64] VP 1957–58/12–3 (20.3.1957).

[65] VP 1959–60/27–8 (26.2.1959).

[66] VP 1957–58/24 (28.3.1957); H.R. Deb. (28.3.1957) 339–40.

[67] VP 1958/9–11 (27.2.1958); VP 1959–60/111–2 (30.4.1959).

[68] The opinion concluded that they do not have this power. It argued that ‘the effect of dissolution [of the House], is in substance, to dissolve the Parliament even though two of the constituent bodies remain’.

[69]See Geoffrey Lindell, ‘Parliamentary inquiries and government witnesses’, Melbourne University Law Review, vol. 20, 1995, p. 399, expressing agreement with a conclusion by Commonwealth Law Officers to the effect that prorogation (and dissolution) means that committees should not continue to operate.

[70]See Odgers, 6th edn, pp. 972–82 and 14th edn, pp. 502–3, 608–10.

[71]See Odgers, 14th edn, pp. 610–14.

[72]Odgers, 14th edn, p. 502–3 (except in the case of a double dissolution).

[73]See for example, hearings of the Senate Select Committee on the Scrafton Evidence, 1 September 2004 (committee established 30 August, dissolution of House 31 August).

[74] The Chairman of Committees was chair of the Joint Committee on the Parliamentary Committee System and was a member of several general purpose standing committees in the 35th Parliament.

[75] S.O. 229(d). Before 2016 practice was not so strict, see previous editions.

[76] E.g. case of Mr Katter at commencement of 41st Parliament (appointed to Industry and Resources Committee 2.12.2004, sworn in 8.3.2005, VP 2004–07/77 (2.12.2004), 213 (8.3.2005)).

[77] S.O. 230. E.g. VP 2002–04/843 (27.3.2003).

[78] S.O. 231. Between 1984 and 1988 an obligation was imposed on Members to declare ‘relevant interests’ at the beginning of a speech in the House or in a committee, or after a division in which the Member proposed to vote was called.

[79] VP 1978–80/35 (1.3.1978); see also H.R. Deb. (7.4.1959) 903; H.R. Deb. (18.3.1959) 772–3.

[80] VP 1993–96/546 (24.11.1993).

[81] VP 1993–96/605 (16.12.1993). And see

[82] VP 1962–63/559 (19.9.1963); H.R. Deb. (19.9.1963) 1176–9.

[83] Joint Committee of Public Accounts, Report 193, PP 84 (1982) vii.

[84] E.g. Committee of Privileges, minutes, 5.5.1994, PP 136 (1994); Standing Committee on Finance and Public Administration, minutes, 18.2.1991; Standing Committee on Primary Industries and Regional Services, minutes, 13.10.1999.

[85] S.O. 231.

[86]See Ch. on ‘Control and conduct of debate’.

[87] VP 1987–90/39–40 (17.9.1987).

[88] The chair of the Joint Committee of Public Accounts could nominate in his place a member of that committee who was a Member of the House of Representatives.

[89] H.R. Deb. (27.6.1976) 2613.

[90] S.O. 215(d)—a maximum of two extra government and two extra non-government or non-aligned Members.

[91] S.O. 229(c).

[92] E.g. VP 1962–63/39 (7.3.1962); VP 1954–55/202 (12.5.1955).

[93] E.g. VP 1996–98/65 (7.5.1996) (Selection Committee).

[94] S.O. 229(a).

[95] S.O. 229(b).

[96] J 1951–53/145–6 (27.2.1952); VP 1951–53/273 (27.2.1952), 278 (28.2.1952).

[97] E.g. Joint Select Committee on Parliamentary and Government Publications, VP 1964–66/25–6, 27 (5.3.1964).

[98] S.O. 229(d). The vacancy is now immediate and automatic.

[99] E.g. VP 2002–04/1452 (19.2.2004).

[100] H.R. Deb. (5.9.1905) 1919.

[101] H.R. Deb. (3.8.2004) 31815, 31817, 31892–3; VP 2002–04/1764–5 (3.8.2004).

[102] VP 2010–13/68 (30.9.2010).

[103] S.O. 11. See Ch. on ‘The Speaker, Deputy Speakers and officers’. In the 32nd Parliament a ballot was conducted for the chairs of the Standing Committee on Expenditure and the Joint Select Committee on Parliamentary Privilege. In the 41st Parliament a ballot was held for the chair of a House standing committee when two government members were nominated.

[104] Under S.O. 14(a) nominees for Deputy Speaker and Second Deputy Speaker are not required to be present or formally accept nomination.

[105] VP 1998–2001/164–74 (3.12.1998).

[106] VP 1998–2001/160–4 (3.12.1998).

[107] VP 1980–83/805–6 (23.3.1982); VP 1983–84/52–3 (4.5.1983).

[108] S.O. 232(a).

[109] Joint Committee on Social Security, VP 1940–43/158, 161–2 (3.7.1941).

[110] Joint Committee on Profits, VP 1940–43/158–9, 162 (3.7.1941).

[111] VP 1956–57/168–9 (24.5.1956) (committee originally named Joint Committee on Constitutional Change), 171 (29.5.1956), 341 (25.10.1956).

[112] S.O.222(b).

[113] S.O. 222A(c).

[114] VP 1987–90/39–40 (17.9.1987).

[115]See for example the dissent of A. J. Forbes in Joint Committee on the Parliamentary Committee System, A proposed system of committees for the Australian Parliament, interim report, PP 275 (1975) 95–7; the dissent of G. M. Bryant and L. R. Johnson in Joint Select Committee on Aboriginal Land Rights in the Northern Territory, Report, PP 351 (1977) 72; H.R. Deb. (18.8.1977) 419, 423; dissenting reports to Committee of Privileges report on allegations by a Member, PP 498 (1989); dissenting report in Standing Committee on Family and Human Services, The winnable war on drugs—The impact of illicit drug use on families, PP 187 (2007) 313–4. see also statements at time of presentation of reports of the Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee, critical of the operation and chair of the committee, H.R. Deb. (9.8.2004) 32425; H.R. Deb. (11.8.2004) 32768–71.

[116] H.R. Deb. (7.6.1955) 1438.

[117] S.O. 232(a). Chairs of joint committees may have a deliberative vote as well—see p. 675. see also ‘Powers of chair’ in May, 24th edn, p. 811.

[118]Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, s.71.

[119] H.R. Deb. (29.3.1944) 2203–24; S. Deb. (30.3.1944) 2281–91.

[120]Parliamentary Service Act 1999, s. 22.

[121] S.O. 232(b).

[122] Standing Committee on Road Safety, VP 1974–75/51–2 (18.7.1974); Select Committee on Aircraft Noise, VP 1970–72/33–4 (11.3.1970).

[123] VP 1976–77/59–60 (16.3.1976).

[124] S.O. 232(b).

[125] The situation prior to the amendment of standing orders on 3.12.1998 is covered in editions 1 to 3.

[126] E.g. VP 1993–96/78–9 (13.5.1993), 131 (27.5.1993), 150 (17.8.1993), 901–2 (24.3.1994); VP 1998–2001/160–4 (3.12.1998); VP 2010–13/44–7 (29.9.2010).

[127]Howard v. Gosset (1845) 10 QB 359 at 379–80, quoted in PP 168 (1972) 3.

[128]  (1955) 92 CLR 157 at 164–70.

[129]A.G. (Commonwealth) v. Colonial Sugar Refining Company Ltd (1914) AC 237.

[130] Enid Campbell, Parliamentary privilege in Australia, 1966, pp. 163–4; see also G. Sawer, ‘Like a host of archangels’, in the Canberra Times, 7 April 1971.

[131] The existence of doubt is acknowledged in D. C. Pearce, Inquiries by Senate committees (1971) 45 ALJ 659. see also Enid Campbell, Parliamentary privilege, Federation Press, 2003, pp. 153–5.

[132]Parliamentary committees: powers over and protection afforded to witnesses, Paper prepared by I. J. Greenwood and R. J. Ellicott, PP 168 (1972) 6–7.

[133]See also Enid Campbell, Parliamentary privilege, 2003, p. 154.

[134] (1954) 90 CLR 177 at 182.

[135]Parliamentary committees: powers over and protection afforded to witnesses, Paper prepared by I. J. Greenwood and R. J. Ellicott, PP 168 (1972) 9.

[136] PP 168 (1972) 7.

[137] Geoffrey Lindell, ‘Parliamentary committees and government witnesses’, Melbourne University Law Review, vol. 20, 1995, pp. 384–91, at 388.

[138] Prior to 3.12.1998 this power was granted to committees individually.

[139] VP 1951–53/129 (17.10.1951). In later Parliaments the restrictions on the committee’s power to call for evidence were gradually eased, VP 1957–58/13–4 (20.3.1957); VP 1959–60/25–6 (25.2.1959); VP 1973–74/52–3 (15.3.1973). The powers of the modern Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade are unqualified in this respect, VP 1998–2001/168 (3.12.1998).

[140]S.O. 216(c).

[141] Since 3.12.98.

[142]And see Odgers, 14th edn, pp. 489–92; but see also Geoffrey Lindell, ‘Parliamentary inquiries and government witnesses’, Melbourne University Law Review, vol. 20, 1995, pp. 392–3, expressing the view that such doubts are not well founded.

[143] Opinion of Solicitor-General, dated 8 August 1941.

[144] Opinion of Solicitor-General Griffith, 12 August 1991. This view was consistent with a joint opinion given in 1985 by the Attorney-General and the Solicitor-General, but see earlier opinion of Solicitor-General Griffith, 20 August 1990, and account of different views outlined in Odgers, 14th edn, pp. 68–73. In a 1984 report the House of Lords Committee of Privileges published an opinion by three Law Lords to the effect that general legislative provisions override previously existing parliamentary privileges (HL 254 (1984)). And see Geoffrey Lindell, ‘Parliamentary inquiries and government witnesses’, Melbourne University Law Review, vol. 20, 1995, pp. 408–9.

[145]Parliamentary Privileges Act 1987, s. 16.

[146]And see May, 24th edn, p. 827.

[147] Prior to 3.12.1998 such authorisation was granted to individual committees by standing order or resolution of appointment.

[148] Because of the lower quorum requirement, a subcommittee is sometimes appointed temporarily to conduct a particular public hearing if it is expected that a quorum of members of the full committee will be unable to attend.

[149] S.O. 234(d).

[150] S.O. 239(a).

[151]And see May, 24th edn, p. 828.

[152] H.R. Deb. (9.1.2000) 22635–6.

[153] PP 275 (1975) xi.

[154] PP 275 (1975) 95–7.

[155] E.g. Standing Committee on Road Safety, Passenger motor vehicle safety, PP 156 (1976) xii. Standing Committee on Transport, Communications and Infrastructure, Constructing and restructuring Australia’s public infrastructure, PP 284 (1987) x.

[156]See page 648.

[157] The Selection Committee was able to be constituted in the 43rd Parliament despite a vacancy in its membership, after the House suspended standing orders to provide for its first meeting, VP 2010–13/68 (30.9.2010)—and see page 660. In the following Parliament the equivalent motion enabled the initial business of the Selection Committee to be determined by the Speaker, Chief Government Whip and Chief Opposition Whip in the absence of a fully constituted committee, VP 2013–16/82 (14.11.13).

[158] S.O. 235(c).

[159] That is, without fixing a day for future action or meeting.

[160] S.O. 95.

[161] S.O. 235(c).

[162] E.g. J 1974–75/655 (14.5.1975).

[163] Joint Committee on Profits, VP 1940–43/158–9, 162 (3.7.1941); Joint Committee on Constitutional Review, VP 1956–57/168–9 (24.5.1956), 171 (29.5.1956) (the name of the committee was altered from Joint Committee on Constitutional Change see PP 50 (1957–58) 4).

[164] Reports 264 and 292 of the Joint Committee of Public Accounts, PP 75 (1987) and PP 317 (1988). see also reports of the Senate Standing Orders Committee, PP 117 (1983) and PP 169 (1987); and J 1987–90/1050 (1.11.1988).

[165]See also Odgers, 14th edn, pp. 527–9.

[166] VP 1968–69/44 (30.4.1968), 53 (2.5.1968), 329 (27.11.1968), 339 (28.11.1968).

[167] VP 1968–69/344 (25.2.1969), 356 (26.2.1969).

[168]And see Sir Barnett Cocks, ‘Parliament goes abroad’, Parliamentarian, LII, no. 1, 1971, p. 10. For UK House of Commons practice see May, 24th edn, pp. 815–16. And see Odgers, 6th edn, p. 756–7.

[169] The Presiding Officers have the authority to approve overseas travel by members of parliamentary delegations under the Parliamentary Business Resources Regulations 2017, ss. 55–57.

[170] However, in recent years several committees have taken evidence from witnesses in other countries by video or teleconference.

[171] An overseas committee exchange with New Zealand has been an ongoing part of the delegations program for many years; in 2014 the Presiding Officers agreed to also include a visit to one other Pacific region country. The visit to countries in Asia has been in place since 2009 and the visit to China since 2011.

[172] Standing Committee on Procedure, Learning from other Parliaments—Study Program 2006, PP 179 (2006).

[173] VP 2010–13/68 (30.9.2010).

[174] S.O. 233(b).

[175] S.O. 233(a).

[176] S.O. 233(a).

[177] S.O. 234(c).

[178] S.O. 225. The Senate could also set such a requirement by resolution or by standing order. The last occasion the Houses fixed the quorum of their respective Members was for the Joint Select Committee of Public Accounts for which the quorum included at least one Member of each House, VP 1932–34/118–9 (11.3.1932); J 1932–34/45, 46 (11.3.1932); see also Joint Select Committee on the Moving-Picture Industry, VP 1926–28/294 (3.3.1927), 303 (11.3.1927).

[179] VP 1993–96/81–3 (13.5.1993).

[180] E.g. VP 1996–98/227–35 (30.5.1996); VP 1998–2001/164–74 (3.12.1998).

[181] VP 1987–90/39–40 (17.9.1987).

[182] VP 2013–16/117–8 (21.11.2013).

[183] Senate S.O. 29(2).

[184] S.O. 232(a). For example of chair’s casting vote being used see Selection Committee, minutes, 1.6.2011. In the 43rd Parliament, in exercising a casting vote the Selection Committee chair (the Speaker) was guided by the principles followed by the Speaker in exercising a casting vote in the House. However, this committee is a special case because of its relationship with proceedings in the House, and other committee chairs have not necessarily felt so constrained.

[185] S.O. 244(d).

[186] E.g. Selection Committee, minutes, 1.6.2011. In this instance the chair (the Speaker) ruled that a proposal in the same terms as one negatived the previous week was not in order as it contravened standing order 114.

[187] E.g. Committee of Privileges, minutes, 21.12.1993, PP 78 (1994).

[188] S.O. 126.

[189] E.g. Selection Committee, minutes, 1.6.2011.

[190] S.O. 232(a). For an exception see Select Committee on Aircraft Noise where the chair had a deliberative vote and, in the event of an equality of votes, also had a casting vote, VP 1969–70/15–7 (25.11.1969).

[191] S.O. 215(d).

[192] VP 1996–98/126–35 (21.5.1996); VP 1998–2001/171 (3.12.1998).

[193] Senate S.O. 31.

[194] Joint Committee on the Australian Capital Territory, VP 1980–83/54–5 (3.12.1980), 69 (4.12.1980).

[195] VP 1993–96/82 (13.5.1993). In later Parliaments the resolution did so provide, e.g. VP 1996–98/127 (21.5.1996); VP 1998–2001/167 (3.12.1998); VP 2010–13/51 (29.9.2010); VP 2013–16/115 (21.11.2013).

[196] VP 1987–90/39–40 (17.9.1987).

[197] S.O. 247(a).

[198] Select Committee on Pharmaceutical Benefits, Report, PP 73 (1972).

[199] S.O. 203. see Ch. on ‘Documents’.

[200] S.O. 241.

[201] Senate S.O. 25(7) (a)–(c).

[202] E.g. VP 2010–13/52 (29.9.2010), 372 1.3.2011), 496–7 (11.5.2011). First Member of the House so appointed, VP 2010–13/481 (10.5.2011).

[203] Senator Feeney appointed with effect from 26 August 2008; public hearing 21–22 August.

[204] S.O. 229(c).

[205]And see May, 24th edn, pp. 251–2.

[206]And see p. 604 of the second edition for details of a case referred by the UK House of Commons to its Committee of Privileges.

[207] S.O. 242(b) and see also the Parliamentary Privileges Act 1987, s. 13. S.O. 242(b) and resolutions of appointment authorise committees to publish any evidence given before them and any document presented to them.

[208] Subject to the provisions of the Parliamentary Privileges Act 1987. (See also Ch. on ‘Parliamentary privilege’, and see May, 24th edn, pp. 259–60.)

[209] Resolution of 11 October 1984, VP 1983–84/988–9 (11.10.1984). (See ‘Disclosure of private or in camera evidence’ in Chapter on ‘Committee inquiries’.)

[210] S.O. 244(a).

[211] Senate Select Committee on the Conduct of a Judge, Report to the Senate, PP 168 (1984); Senate Select Committee on Allegations Concerning a Judge, Report to the Senate, PP 279 (1984).

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