Second Sydney Airport: a decade of deferral 2002–2012

10 July 2012

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Matthew L. James
Science, Technology, Environment and Resources Section

This is a compilation of actions undertaken over the past decade relating to the establishment of a second Sydney Airport. For the period prior to 2002, readers should consult the Parliamentary Library Chronology No. 2 2001–02 Second Sydney Airport—A Chronology which contains a list of relevant documents including the earlier environmental impact studies and planning reports. In some ways little has changed, since that earlier publication noted that:

In examining the history of this issue it is apparent that while there is almost limitless rhetoric about the urgent need for a second Sydney airport, governments have generally hastened slowly. It is clear that for all the energies and costs that have gone into consideration of a second Sydney airport for decades, a decision, or a plan, seem little closer than they were years ago. It will be up to the reader to determine whether this has been a wise move, or whether this has meant that delays will make the eventual construction of the airport more difficult.

 

Milestones

Details

Source documents

14 May 2002

Government content with Sydney Airport

In response to a question from Mr John Murphy, the Minister for Transport and Regional Services, Mr John Anderson stated: ‘After lengthy and careful consideration to finding the best way to cater for Sydney's future aviation needs, the Government concluded that Sydney Airport will be able to handle the air traffic demand over the next ten years and that Bankstown Airport will be made available as an overflow airport for Sydney that will, over time, become an attractive alternative for some airline services. The Government will further review Sydney's airport needs in 2005.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 2043, 14 May 2002.

28 May 2002

Government to review airport needs in 2005

In further responses to a long series of questions from Mr John Murphy, the Minister for Transport and Regional Services, Mr John Anderson stated: ‘The successful purchaser (of Sydney Airport) will be offered a first right of refusal by the Commonwealth to build and operate any second major airport within 100 kilometres of the Sydney CBD. The Government will review Sydney's airspace needs in 2005’.

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 2530, 28 May 2002; House of Representatives, Debates, p. 2846, 30 May 2002.

12 April 2003

Sale of Sydney Basin airports

Commonwealth Government paid advertisements appeared in the nation’s newspapers calling for expressions of interest in its Bankstown, Hoxton Park and Camden airports. It was reportedly the Government’s preference to sell the three mainly general aviation facilities, known as the Sydney Basin airports, as a package.

Govt shelves plans for second airport’, Canberra Times, 10 April 2003, p. 2.

12 June 2003

Opposition to review SSA policy

The Shadow Minister for Regional Development, Transport, Infrastructure and Tourism, Martin Ferguson, said that the ALP Federal Platform was under review including the policy to build a second airport in the Sydney basin. He claimed that the Howard Government was selling airports without any proper plan in place for Sydney’s future aviation needs. He said that the decision was made without consultation or consideration of the future needs of local communities.

M Ferguson MP, ‘Sydney community must be more involved in airport policy’, media release, 12 June 2003.  

16 June 2003

Bankstown and Badgerys Creek both ruled out

By this date, the Commonwealth had spent more than $144 million buying land at the proposed Sydney West airport site at Badgerys Creek.  Furthermore, while the Howard Government had indicated that Bankstown Airport, the largest of the three general aviation airports in the Sydney Basin, would be expanded to cope with overflow from the recently privatised Sydney Airport, it had recently retracted this strategy. In announcing the sale of Bankstown Airport in April 2003, the Acting Transport Minister, Wilson Tuckey, indicated that the 'overflow' role for Bankstown was no longer necessary because of a decline in air traffic after the terrorist attacks of 2001, the collapse of Ansett and the trend to larger aircraft on regional routes. He indicated that the sale would proceed without development obligations. Shortly after this, the Opposition Leader Simon Crean, together with Martin Ferguson, announced the dropping of Badgerys Creek as Labor’s preferred site for a second Sydney Airport (SSA).

J Kain and R Webb, Turbulent times: Australian airline industry issues 2003, Research Paper no. 10 2002—03, Dept of the Parliamentary Library, 2003; S Crean (Leader of the Opposition) and M Ferguson MP, ‘No airport at Badgerys Creek under Labor’, joint statement, 27 July 2003. 

27 July 2003

The Opposition changed its mind

After his unexpected announcement about Badgerys Creek, Mr Crean defused the immediate controversy by agreeing to put a new preferred site to the national conference in January 2004. The decision was unanimously endorsed by the ALP caucus.

Crean sorry for Badgerys rift’, Daily Telegraph, 31 July 2003, p.3.

11 August 2003

Opposition committee established to investigate a site for a SSA

After weeks of reported turmoil, a meeting of the Opposition shadow ministry agreed to Mr Crean’s proposal to set up a new committee to investigate a site for a SSA.  The committee would consist of the shadow treasurer, Mark Latham,  the shadow attorney-general, Robert McClelland, the employment services spokesman, Anthony Albanese, and the ALP Senate leader, John Faulkner, in a group headed by the Opposition Leader, Simon Crean.

Meanwhile in the House, Mr Kerry Bartlett, argued against any airport expansion at the Richmond RAAF Base. Other members expressed concerns at the lack of any alternative airport mentioned in the new Sydney Airport Master Plan.

L Dodson, ‘Crean avoids row over airport site’, Age, 12 August 2003, p. 4; House of Representatives, Debates, p. 18056, p. 18017, p. 17958, p. 17947, 11 August 2003; L Allen, ‘A second Sydney airport? Not during Howard's term in office’, Australian Financial review, 11 August 2003, p. 7.

18 August 2003

Opposition backbencher push to drop Badgerys Creek

In a Private Member’s Business motion to the House, Mr Murphy moved that the House:

‘(1) declares that Badgerys Creek is no longer a viable site for the location of a second airport for the people of Sydney; and

(2) recommends that a Joint Select Committee be established to identify a site suitable for the location of Sydney's second airport, having regard to (a) aircraft noise; (b) air pollution and (c) other risks associated with aircraft movements.’

The motion lapsed. Meanwhile, NSW Premier Bob Carr had declared the city as too full for another international terminal.

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 18731, 18 August 2003. L Mcllveen and M Saunders, ‘No space for airport says Carr’, Australian, 13 August 2003, p. 5.

1 September 2003

Canberra Airport proposed itself as a SSA solution

With advertisements in the media, Canberra International Airport launched a campaign to promote itself as the long-term solution to the Sydney second airport debate.

G Cooke, ‘ACT push for Sydney air traffic’, Canberra Times, 1 September 2003, p. 1.

5 November 2003

Badgerys Creek preferred over Wilton for transport and environmental reasons

In reply to a question from Mr Kim Beazley, the Minister for Transport and Regional Services, Mr John Anderson, stated that: ‘Badgerys Creek and Wilton were subject to a full environmental impact assessment as part of the 1985 Second Sydney Airport Site Selection Programme Environmental Impact Statement (1985 EIS). In February 1986, the then Government selected Badgerys Creek rather than Wilton as the site for a second Sydney airport. The disadvantages of Wilton were seen as its greater distance from the markets the airport was intended to serve, greater development cost, and greater impact on the natural environment. The 1985 EIS also noted the Wilton site was located in the drinking water catchment for Sydney. Since that time there have been no formal studies undertaken by my Department which have concluded that Wilton was the second favoured site after Badgerys Creek for a second Sydney airport within the Sydney Basin.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 22275, 5 November 2003; B Sandilands, ‘Can Sydney Airport cope?’, Aircraft and Aerospace, October 2003.

4 December 2003

Government reaffirmed reliance on Sydney Airport

 The Acting Prime Minister and Minister for Transport and Regional Services, John Anderson, confirmed the Australian Government had no plans to build a second Sydney airport. He said:

‘Following exhaustive examination it is clear the existing airport at Mascot will be able to handle air traffic demands for a long time to come. Our policy is based firmly on the economic and planning needs of Sydney’s future air traffic requirements. Changes in management and aircraft combined have meant that even with the very real constraining arrangements in place at Sydney Airport, like the curfew and the Long Term Operating Plan (LTOP), there is no need to build a second airport.’

J Anderson (Deputy Prime Minister, Minister for Transport and Regional Services Leader of The Nationals), ‘No Need for second Sydney Airport’, media release, 4 December 2003.

30 January 2004

ALP Opposition proposed an EIS for Wilton while also nominating Wells Creek near Sutton Forest

After a month of speculation and media commentaries, the Australian Labor Party (ALP) announced at its national party conference that when it won power it would conduct an environmental impact assessment for Wilton as the preferred site for a SSA. The Minister for Transport John Anderson criticised the plan, describing it as a purely political decision. The Opposition parliamentary committee, which had been established in August 2003 to consider a new preferred site, also nominated Wells Creek - near Sutton Forest, north of Goulburn - as another potential site. Both sites were located within the federal seat of Hume in the southern NSW tablelands.

Wilton named as preferred airport site’, Canberra Times, 31 January 2004, p. 7; J  Anderson (Deputy Prime Minister, Minister for Transport and Regional Services Leader of The Nationals), ‘Wilton or somewhere else ‘south of the Nepean’ – the airport that will never be built’, media release, 30 January 2004.

11 February 2004

Government again reaffirmed a reliance on Sydney Airport into the future

Mr Pat Farmer asked the Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister for Transport and Regional Services: ‘Would the minister please advise the House of the government's position on the construction of a second airport to service Sydney? And are there any alternative policies?’ Mr Anderson (Deputy Prime Minister) replied: ‘I thank the honourable member for his question. The government very closely and very fully examined Sydney's airport needs some time ago. I have to say that even while fully maintaining the curfew, the 18 movements per hour cap, the noise-sharing arrangements and full regional access—something the government is very deeply committed to—the fact is that the airport will plainly carry Sydney's airport needs for many years into the future. The position is simple: Sydney will not need a second airport in the foreseeable future. Indeed, any attempt to identify a site at this point in time would be fraught with difficulties in establishing the real parameters, the real needs and the real solution, because there is not a problem.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 24406, 11 February 2004.

01 March 2004

ALP Opposition committed to a SSA outside the Sydney basin.

The ALP national platform and constitution 2004 stated that: ‘For aviation, Labor will:

—maintain Qantas as Australia's international carrier, delivering high levels of service and providing a substantial proportion of Australia's international aviation needs;

—foster the development of the general aviation sector and develop the potential of the aviation industry as an  important export industry;

—encourage the growth of air freight through upgraded airport facilities, increased competition in cargo terminal operations and improvements in the logistics chain;

—ensure that privatised airports maintain competitive pricing regimes, high quality services and strict environmental and safety requirements, and facilitate local ownership and operation of regional airports;

—ensure regional communities have proper access to safety services; and

develop an integrated Sydney Transport Plan that provides for Sydney's future airport needs, including a preferred second Sydney airport site outside the Sydney basin. Labor will maintain the cap and curfew at Kingsford Smith Airport and implement the long-term operating plan maximising takeoffs over water’.

Australian Labor Party, ALP national platform and constitution 2004, policy document 2004.

11 March 2004

Government redefined candidate airport sites such as -Closer sites: Badgerys Creek, Bringelly, Holsworthy, Scheyville and Londonderry. Mid-distance sites: Darkes Forest, Somersby, Warnervale and Wilton. Outlying site: Goulburn.

Mr John Murphy asked the Minister for Transport and Regional Services, upon notice, on 19 February 2004:

‘(1) Did he describe the Wilton site as a distant site in his Media Release A2/2004 dated 13 January 2004 concerning a second Sydney airport.

(2) Does the 1985 Department of Aviation Second Sydney Airport Site Selection Programme define Darkes Forest, Somersby, Warnervale and Wilton all as mid-distance sites.

(3) Does that report describe Goulburn as the only outlying site in the 10 site-selection process.

(4) For the purposes of a potential site for a second Sydney airport, (a) what is the definition of the term `outlying site', and (b) why has he classified Wilton as an outlying site and not a mid-distance site in his Media Release of 13 January 2004.’

Mr Anderson (Minister for Transport and Regional Services) replied: ‘The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1) Yes.

(2) The 1985 Department of Aviation Second Sydney Airport Site Selection Programme grouped ten potential airport sites according to their geographical location in relation to Sydney. Closer sites: Badgerys Creek, Bringelly, Holsworthy, Scheyville and Londonderry. Mid-distance sites: Darkes Forest, Somersby, Warnervale and Wilton.

Outlying site: Goulburn.

(3) See answer (2) above.

(4) (a) As per answer (2) above, the term ‘outlying site’ is a relative descriptor and has no standard definition. (b) The media release of 13 January 2004 did not describe Wilton as an ‘outlying site’ but referred to it as ‘distant’, which is not    inconsistent with the terminology in answer (2) above.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 26732, 11 March 2004.

22 March 2004

ALP member reaffirmed to an EIS on a southwest SSA site

Mr Albanese stated that:

‘I rise today to again put on the record my absolute opposition to the Sydney airport master plan ... It is fanciful for SACL [Sydney Airport Corporation Ltd] to argue that the increase in flights and passengers can be accommodated without the construction of a second airport for Sydney ...

The master plan suggests there will be no need for a second Sydney airport in the next 20 years. I believe this is dishonest and motivated by the profit-taking needs of Macquarie, who own Sydney airport. There is no doubt that, unless a second airport is built for Sydney, the inevitable pressure will be on to move the regional flights to Bankstown and other regional airports, thereby having a devastating impact on Sydney.

... Most importantly, upon coming to government Labor will do a new, comprehensive EIS into a preferred site south of the Nepean River through to the Southern Highlands. Labor will work with the New South Wales government and local governments to draw upon their best advice to identify specific sites within this corridor and ensure that we get on with building a second airport for Sydney.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 26812, 22 March 2004.

24 March 2004

Government maintained its no SSA stance

In reply to a question on the Sydney Airport Master Plan, the Minister for Transport, John Anderson, stated that: ‘Mr Speaker, through you, the member for Batman is wrong when he says that we need a second Sydney airport. The member for Grayndler, who has just departed this place, says that we will have to remove the movement cap, the LTOP and the curfew. That is what he said—and he is wrong.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 27077, 24 March 2004; ‘Airport critics make noise’, Canberra Times, 24 March 2004, p. 9.

30 March 2004

Opposition again suggested an EIS for Wilton site

In a matter of public importance on Aviation: Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport noise, Mr Albanese noted: ‘The alternative put forward by the Labor Party is to have a second Sydney airport environmental impact statement. We do not want the problems of aircraft noise visited on anyone. That is why we say that, upon coming into government, we will have an EIS into the Wilton site and into sites in the southern highlands.’ Further debate followed.

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 27611, 30 March 2004; J Kerr, ‘Coming to the sky near you’, Sydney Morning Herald, 27 March 2004, p. 34.

28 May 2004

Prime Minister ruled out a SSA

The Prime Minister, John Howard, rules out a new airport on the basis that: ‘We have a very good airport. There has been a lot of sharing around in relation to the noise burden, and all the information we have says that you don’t need a second airport in the foreseeable future. So it can only be that there are still people in the Labor Party who are trying in the long run to phase out Kingsford Smith, which is ridiculous.’

J Howard (Prime Minister), Second Sydney Airport, Transcript of press conference:  Parramatta, 28 May 2004.

29 May 2004

Sutton Forest SSA proposal mooted

Both Canberra Airport and the Prime Minister and Transport Minister dismissed reports of NSW Government interest in an airport site in the Southern Highlands near Sutton Forest.

Locations of proposed sites for the Second Sydney Airport

Locations of proposed sites for the Second Sydney Airport 

 (Note that Sutton Forest is located southwest of Wilton.)

F Cassidy, ‘Second Sydney Airport site not possible’, Canberra Times, 29 May 2006, p. 1.

Image Source: Department of Aviation. Second Sydney Airport: Site Selection Programme,

Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Ultimo, NSW: Kinhill Stearns, April 1985.

31 May 2004

Opposition Leader lodged a SSA planning FOI request on NSW Government

In reply to a question from Joanna Gash, the Minister for Transport stated: ‘In a nutshell, Sydney does not need a second airport in the foreseeable future and there is no point in looking for one. Indeed, it would be very bad public policy in my view to go and try to find a site now and seek to build one ... We now know, thanks to the Leader of the Opposition in New South Wales lodging an FOI request that quite a bit of detailed information has been sought, assembled and put together for the Labor Party. The Leader of the Opposition lodged the freedom of information application, attached the required fee and requested:

... all file notes, emails, reports or other documents relating to discussions regarding possible locations for a second Sydney airport or any planning or future land use issues relating to Wilton, Sutton Forest, Berrima or Wells Creek in Wingecarribee or Wollondilly shires held between the honourable Craig Knowles or his staff and the federal opposition leader and his staff or designated agents.

They have made a lot of talk over there about how they would be consulting with their New South Wales colleagues. Shortly after that, back came the reply from the relevant FOI officer:

I have this day determined—it says in part—that full access be granted to the information you requested. Full access! Please find attached one document detailing the information pertinent to your application. As to the one document, what is it? A very detailed exploration of the possibility of Sutton Park is what it is, setting out all of the reasons why it ought to be built at Sutton Park.’

Further debate followed.

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 29504, 31 May 2004.

11 June 2004

Sydney Airport opposed a SSA

The Sydney Airports Corporation chairman and chief executive, Mr Max Moore-Wilton, criticised the idea of building a second airport in the Southern Highlands, saying it made more sense to increase capacity at Kingsford Smith.

L Allen, ‘SACL rejects new airport’, Australian Financial Review, 11 June 2004, p. 8.

15 September 2004

Government reindorsed Sydney Airport LTOP

The LNP Policy Building our National Transport Future stated that: ‘We will not build a second Sydney Airport, and will retain full regulatory control of aircraft noise management. Sydney Airport will continue to be subject to the 80 movements per hour cap, the curfew and the Long Term Operating Plan (LTOP). Regional airlines will continue to have guaranteed access to the airport.’

Liberal-National Coalition policy, Building our National Transport Future, policy document 2004.


10 May 2005

Government announced that the 2005 review of Sydney’s airport needs would not now proceed

Mr Martin Ferguson had asked the Minister for Transport and Regional Services, in writing, on 8 February 2005:

‘(1)   When will the Government commence its review of Sydney’s airport needs.

(2)   Have draft terms of reference been prepared.

(3)   Who will conduct the review.

(4)   Will the review include consideration of (a) the Badgerys Creek site, and (b) Bankstown, Camden, Richmond, Newcastle and Canberra airports.

Mr Anderson (Minister for Transport and Regional Services) replied: ‘The answer to the honourable member’s question is as follows:

(1)   to (4) The Government’s intention, originally stated in December 2000, that it would review Sydney’s airport needs in 2005, was announced in the context of its lengthy and careful consideration of Sydney’s future airport needs. At that time, the Government concluded that Sydney Airport would be able to cope with increasing air traffic to the end of the decade and that it would be premature to build a second major airport. Fundamental changes have taken place in the aviation industry since that time, which have led the Government to form the view that a second Sydney airport will not be needed in the foreseeable future. The Sydney Airport Master Plan, which was approved last year, indicated that the airport would be able to cope with Sydney’s air traffic needs for at least twenty years. Consequently, the Government has not yet decided on the extent and nature of any new review of Sydney’s airport needs.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 151, 10 May 2005.

22 June 2005

Government ruled out a SSA for 20 years

In the House, Transport Minister John Anderson: ‘ruled out a second Sydney Airport in the foreseeable future. He said the existing airport could cope with Sydney's air traffic needs for at least 20 years. Mr Anderson said a second Sydney airport could not be justified and would be a white elephant that would cost the aviation industry a lot of money.’

No new Sydney Airport’, Australian Financial Review, 23 June 2005, p. 4. House of Representatives, Debates, p. 75, 22 June 2005.

29 May 2006

Government retained Badgerys Creek site land

The Member for Fowler, Mr Chris Hayes, noted the Government response to his question on a SSA:

‘(1)   The former Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Transport and Regional Services, the Hon John Anderson MP, did write to the former New South Wales Minister for Infrastructure, Planning and Natural Resources, the Hon Craig Knowles MP, in 2003 and 2004 asking that the aircraft noise contours for the three airport options identified in the 1999 Environmental Impact Statement for the Second Sydney Airport Proposal at Badgerys Creek be taken into consideration in the planning of future urban development in the Bringelly area.

(2)   The three airport design options are those that were addressed in the 1999 Environmental Impact Statement for the Second Sydney Airport Proposal at Badgerys Creek.

(3)   The Government has previously made it clear that it does not believe that a second Sydney airport will be needed in the foreseeable future. This position has not changed.

In a related question he noted that: ‘The Government also previously said that it would retain the land at Badgerys Creek in Commonwealth ownership and protect the site from incompatible development in surrounding areas.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 156, 29 May 2006.

13 June 2006

Opposition alleged that the Deputy Prime Minister confirmed a review of Badgerys Creek in 2009

Mr Chris Bowen, claimed to highlight the differences between party policies on a second airport by stating: “The government has broken its promise on Badgerys Creek airport. It promised to make a definitive announcement on the future of the site by 2005. It is now June 2006 and there has been no announcement. On 10 May 2005, I asked the then Minister for Transport and Regional Services two simple questions: (1) When will he be making an announcement on the future of Badgerys Creek Airport. (2) What further studies, reports or reviews are necessary before he makes a definitive announcement on the future of the proposed Badgerys Creek Airport. Twelve months later I have now received a reply from the new Minister for Transport (Mr Vaile) which does not answer the question. The answer states: ‘The government has previously made it clear that it does not believe that a second Sydney airport will be needed in the foreseeable future. The position has not changed.’ ” Mr Bowen later noted that: ‘the Deputy Prime Minister had written to councils in Western Sydney confirming that there would be another review of the need for a Badgerys Creek airport in 2009 and, until then, land at Badgerys Creek would be held in reserve.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 136, 13 June 2006;

J Dickens, ‘Airport site still on hold’, Sunday Telegraph, 25 February 2007, p. 32;

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 116, 24 May 2007.

30 November 2006

Mr Chris Hayes, raised the matter of the airport noting that the Government’s response to his query stated: ‘The government has previously made it clear that it does not believe that a second airport will be needed in the foreseeable future.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 114, 30 November 2006.

14 November 2007

New Coalition Minister reaffirmed no SSA policy

The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Transport and Regional Services, Mark Vaile, announced that the Coalition Government remained strongly committed to not investigating sites for, or building, a second Sydney airport and to maintaining the current Sydney Airport curfew and regional airline access.

M Vaile (Deputy Prime Minister), Australian aviation: the Coalition aiming even higher, media release, 14 November 2007.

30 November 2007

New ALP Minister favoured SSA site outside Sydney

After a change of government, the new Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Anthony Albanese, reiterated that Labor had favoured a site outside the Sydney Basin but shelved plans to sell land for an airport at Badgerys Creek.

S Creedy, ‘Albanese hits the ground running’, Australian, 30 November 2007, p. 40.


29 January 2008

New Government re-established Sydney Airport Community Forum

Minister Albanese announced that: ‘The Rudd Labor Government has re-established the Sydney Airport Community Forum (SACF), honoring its election pledge and restoring the community's ability to have direct input into decisions about the operation of the Airport. The Sydney Airport Community Forum will play three key roles: Advise the Commonwealth Transport Minister on noise abatement and related environmental issues; facilitate consultation with and information flows to the community regarding the airport's operations; and provide a direct channel for the community to engage with Sydney Airport Corporation and AirServices Australia on the Airport's noise sharing plan. The Forum will include twenty-five representatives from the community, local councils, industry as well as State and Federal parliaments.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Sydney Airports neighbours get their voice back, media release, 29 January 2008.

20 February 2008

New Minister committed to curfew

Minister Albanese stated: ‘The current curfew gets the balance right. There is a balance to be had between the commercial operations of an airport and the fact that airports and other pieces of economic infrastructure exist in communities. Sydney Airport happens to exist in a community that is the most densely populated area of Australia not just Sydney. So getting that balance right is also, might I say, in the interests of Sydney Airport, and of airlines.’

National Press Club Address, Anthony Albanese: Minister For Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development And Local Government, 20 February 2008.

20 March 2008

Government amended slot management

The Sydney Airport Demand Management Amendment Bill 2008 was introduced by the Minister, to enable changes to be made to the existing legislation to improve the operation of the slots regime and the enforcement of the movement limit at Sydney airport. A key objective of the current Act was to put in place a cap on the number of movements on the runway of 80 in a regulated hour.

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 2393, 20 March 2008.

6 April 2008

Government committed to monitor airport cost charges

Minister Albanese revealed that: ‘The Rudd Labor Government will direct the consumer watchdog - the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) - to monitor car parking costs and revenue at the nation's five major airports.’ This specifically included Sydney Airport.

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), New watch on airport parking fees, media release, 6 April 2008.

6 June 2008

Airport security screening reviewed

Minister Albanese announced that ‘The new External Advisory Group assisting the Rudd Labor Government in its review of security screening at the nation's airports has started its work - and will listen to the views and experiences of the travelling public.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Aviation Security Screening Review Advisory Group, media release, 6 June 2008.

13 October 2008

Sydney Airport Runway End Safety Area project begun

Minister Albanese made a ministerial statement relating to the Runway End Safety Area project. This involved a temporary and partial closure of the east-west runway. His approval of Sydney Airport's RESA Major Development Plan in August 2008 included 22 stringent conditions to make sure the project's impact on the community was minimized, resulting in the East West Runway being available for some departures to the east. Over the duration of the project Sydney Airport complied with all conditions, investing some $100 million. The work was completed by 29 March 2010.

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 8803, 13 October 2008. A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Runway safety gets a boost at Sydney Airport, media release, 29 March 2010.

2 December 2008

Government’s Aviation Green Paper launched and announced a process to identify additional capacity in the Sydney region

Minister Albanese launched the Aviation Green Paper stating: ‘No airport issue has been more controversial or long-standing than Sydney. The need for additional capacity in Sydney has been acknowledged for many years, but the challenge is obviously finding the right site for a second airport. To find the right site we need to have the right process. The simple fact is that, while Sydney Airport is coping with growth at the moment, it is nearing capacity. The so-called peak hour at Sydney Airport has trebled in a decade from two hours a day to at least six hours a day. The legislated curfew and hourly movement cap at Sydney Airport will remain.  Investment in aviation infrastructure is a long and complex process, and it's clear we need to take a long term view. Sydney Airport Corporation is currently working on its Master Plan which forecasts activity and development at the airport for the next twenty years. It is important this process concludes and that all stakeholders take the opportunities available for input into the plan. Once this plan is complete, I will establish a further process to identify additional capacity for the Sydney region. I'll announce further details about this process in the White Paper next year. The Rudd Government does not support building a second Sydney airport at Badgerys Creek.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Launch of the Aviation Green Paper, media release, 2 December 2008.

6 January 2009

Paper released on safeguarding aviation infra-structure and surrounding communities

Minister Albanese announced the appointment of Mr Barry Cotter as Chair of the Sydney Airport Community Forum (SACF), following the recent resignation of Mr Vic Smith.  In June 2009, the Government released a discussion paper Safeguarding for airports and the communities around them and sought views by 31 July 2009 on how this national risk-based policy initiative might be developed. The aim was to increase public safety and protect aviation infrastructure from inappropriate development around airports and under flight paths.

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), New chair for Sydney Airport Community Forum, media release, 6 January 2009.

23 February 2009

Holsworthy site discussed

Hon Danna Vale MP, asked the Minister: ‘Does the Government intend to include Holsworthy Army Base on the list of possible sites for Sydney’s second airport?’ The Minister replied ‘The only suggestion I have heard of Holsworthy Army Base being used as a possible site for Sydney’s second airport is in the proposal made by the former Howard Government.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 1569, 23 February 2009.

22 March 2009

Bikie brawl airport incident

A bikie brawl at Sydney Airport left one person dead. Witnessed by many passengers checking in to domestic Qantas flights, the event called into question terminal security arrangements.

D Welch, L Kennedy and E Harvey, ‘Bikie killed in airport brawl’, Sydney Morning Herald, 23 March 2009.

5 May 2009

Jetstar fined for curfew breach

At Sydney's Downing Centre Local Court, Jetstar was fined $148 500 for breaching the curfew at Sydney Airport in December 2007. Jetstar was the first Australian airline to be prosecuted and fined for breaching the curfew, albeit some 18 months after the event.

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure,  Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Jetstar fined $148,500 for breach of Sydney airport curfew, media release, 05 May 2009.

14 May 2009

Kurnell site mooted

Mr Scott Morrison asked the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government: ‘Will he rule out the construction of a second Sydney Airport at Kurnell, on the basis that a second airport has been ruled out for Badgerys Creek.’ Mr Albanese replied ‘A process to identify additional capacity for the Sydney region will be initiated after I have considered Sydney Airport Corporation Limited’s draft Master Plan for Sydney Airport. As I indicated when launching the National Aviation Policy Green Paper on 2 December 2008, I do not intend to speculate on possible sites for a second Sydney airport.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 4029, 14 May 2009.

19 June 2009

Joint Federal-NSW study into airport needs proposed

Minister Albanese said: ‘Today I have approved Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport's 2009 Master Plan - but in doing so I note its long term forecasts are further evidence that Sydney will require new airport capacity. Sydney Airport Corporation plans to further develop the site in order to support the aviation activities so critical to the economy. Already this critical piece of aviation infrastructure handles about a third of the nation's air traffic, generates approximately $8 billion in annual economic activity and supports more than 200,000 jobs. Specifically, the Master Plan proposes to increase the proportion of the site used for aviation activities from 86 to 91 per cent; improve the taxiway system so aircraft can move around the site quickly and safely; expand freight handling facilities; and provide more gates at both the domestic and international terminals.

… The national interest dictates that Sydney will need new airport capacity. That's why I have today invited the NSW Government to participate in a joint study to assess options, identify potential sites and evaluate investment strategies for delivering additional airport capacity. The joint study will also look at ways of providing integrated transport solutions for the existing airport as well as any second airport. It will also consider the future of the Badgerys Creek site given the Government has ruled it out as an option for a second airport. The study's final terms of reference will be outlined in the National Aviation White Paper expected to be released later this year.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Sydney Airport Master Plan 2009, media release, 19 June 2009;

Sydney Airports Corporation Ltd, Sydney Airport Master Plan 2009, June 2009.

1 July 2009

NSW acted to protect the Badgerys Creek site

NSW Directions issued on 1 July 2009 to relevant planning authorities, under section 117(2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, stated that:

LOCAL PLANNING DIRECTIONS Section 117(2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

5.8 Second Sydney Airport: Badgerys Creek

Objective (1) The objective of this direction is to avoid incompatible development in the vicinity of any future second Sydney Airport at Badgerys Creek.

LOCAL PLANNING DIRECTIONS NSW, Section 117(2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, NSW Directions issued on 1 July 2009.

12 August 2009

Joint airport capacity study progressed

In reply to a question about a SSA, made by Mr Scott Morrison, Minister Albanese stated that: ‘The Federal Government has invited the NSW Government to participate in a joint study to assess options, identify potential sites and evaluate investment strategies for delivering additional airport capacity for Sydney. The final terms of reference for the joint study will be released later this year as part of the National Aviation White Paper. Until the findings of the joint study are delivered, the Australian Government is not going to speculate on possible sites for a second Sydney airport.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 75, 12 August 2009.

25 September 2009

Badgerys Creek land dealings inquiry held

The NSW Department of Planning made a submission to the NSW Legislative Council inquiry into land dealings and planning decisions regarding land at Badgerys Creek. The Department of Planning’s submission indicated that it had conducted detailed investigations into the proposed use of lands at Badgerys Creek but ultimately did not release the land because of servicing and infrastructure constraints.

NSW Department of Planning, Submission to the General Purpose Standing Committee No. 4, New South Wales Upper House Inquiry into: Badgerys Creek Land Dealings and Property Decisions, 25 September 2009.

20 November 2009

Badgerys Creek inquiry found serious issues

The NSW Legislative Council released a report of its inquiry into Badgerys Creek entitled Badgerys Creek land dealings and planning decisions. The inquiry followed reports of dubious property disputes and serious allegations of corruption. Following the release of the report, the NSW Planning Minister, Kristina Keneally, said: ‘The (inquiry) report is crystal clear on the status of the Badgerys Creek land. The report shows the Department of Planning refused to rezone the land four times in the last four years. It shows that there are no current plans to rezone the land.’

K Keneally (Minister for Planning NSW), Report into Badgerys Creek Land Dealings and Planning Decisions, media release, 20 November, 2009.

23 November 2009

Joint Federal-NSW study into airport capacity needs formally announced

Minister Albanese announced a new study into airport needs: ‘The national economic interest dictates that Sydney will need additional airport capacity. The Federal and New South Wales Governments have agreed to conduct a joint study to assess options, identify potential sites and evaluate investment strategies for delivering additional airport capacity. The study's final terms of reference will be outlined in the National Aviation Policy White Paper, which will be released shortly.

This joint study will look at ways of providing integrated transport solutions for the existing airport as well as additional airport capacity. It will also consider the future of the Badgerys Creek site given the Government has ruled it out as an option for a second airport. This will focus on how the site can provide a stimulus for jobs and economic development for western Sydney. In the meantime, the Government will not engage in speculation about individual locations. The issue of additional airport capacity for Sydney will be dealt with through a planned and sensible process.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Additional airport capacity For Sydney, media release, 23 November 2009.

16 December 2009

Government Aviation White Paper suggested initial usage of RAAF Richmond as a SSA, ruled out Badgerys Creek and committed to the airport capacity needs joint study

The Government released its aviation ‘White Paper’. The paper indicated that: ‘The Government aims to work with the New South Wales Government to develop by 2011 an Aviation Strategic Plan to determine the Sydney region’s future airport infrastructure needs, including linkages to urban growth centres and road and rail transport systems.

Arguments remain for the second airport to serve, in particular, the low cost carrier markets and north-western demographic growth areas, with the mooted possibility of interim services to commence at the Richmond RAAF Base. The Government is to review the civil and Defence airport facilities in the Sydney region, with an assessment of their capacity to meet the area’s future aviation needs.

The Commonwealth and the New South Wales State Government are to develop a joint proposal for the future use of the reserved second Sydney airport site at Badgerys Creek which is ‘no longer an option’ for airport use.’

The department has provided submissions on planning proposals that may have an impact or be impacted by airport operations: Sydney—Proposed Rezoning at Kurnell Peninsula (December 2009) and Sydney—Draft Local Environment Plan for North Sydney (October 2010).’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), National aviation policy statement released, media release, 16 December 2009.

M James and R Webb, Aviation white paper: an overview, Background note 2009–10, Parliamentary Library, Canberra, 24 February 2010; DITRDLG, National aviation policy white paper: flight path to the future, December 2009.

2 February 2010

Long Term Operating Plan procedures questioned

In reply to a series of questions from Mr Scott Morrison about Standard Terminal Arrivals Routes (STAR) procedures, Minister Albanese stated: ‘The process involves initial procedures design by AirServices conducted in accordance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) requirements and the AirServices Australia design manual. The Long Term Operating Plan (LTOP) Implementation and Monitoring Committee (IMC) is notified of the proposal and advises the Sydney Airport Community Forum (SACF).’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 139, 2 February 2010.

5 April 2010

Joint study progress reported

Minister Albanese stated that: ‘As people would be aware the Federal Government has commissioned a joint study with the State Government into Sydney’s airport needs and related land transport matters. This committee is jointly chaired by the head of my Department, Mike Mrdak, and Mr Sam Haddad of the NSW Planning Department — it contains various private sector expertise as well as drawing upon the resources of both public service organizations. It’s looking at the need for Sydney to have a second airport and related land transport matters. And it will report to the governments in the second half of this year…Sydney is Australia's global city. It is the city that global citizens want to fly into more so than any other airport around Australia. And it's vital that that infrastructure be kept up to date. That is why we need a second airport. What is not a solution is a removal of either the curfew or the cap which are constraints that have been put legitimately around Sydney Airport...The committee is examining all of the options. I'm letting them do their work without ruling things in or out. The government has a position of not proceeding with Badgerys Creek.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Sydney needs a second airport; Transcript of press conference: Commonwealth and Parliamentary Offices, Sydney, 5 April 2011.

11 May 2010

Budget funded joint study

As foreshadowed in the 2009 National Aviation Policy White Paper, in the 2010–11 Federal Budget, under the Aviation Strategic Plan for the Sydney Region announcement, the Government provided $8.5 million to jointly develop this plan with the New South Wales Government. The Plan was to consider options for additional capacity in the Sydney region as well as future options for the release of land at the Commonwealth’s Badgerys Creek site.

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Budget 2010: Budget Delivers an unprecedented boost to aviation, media release, 11 May 2010.

26 May 2010

Required Navigation Performance questioned

Minister Albanese said he would wait until he had proof that Required Navigation Performance (RNP) would produce a lower noise outcome at Sydney, through RNP AirServices Australia operations. AirServices Australia had intended to introduce the straight line “glide in” lower noise approaches to Sydney Airport by the end of the year, using the new procedure.

B Sandilands, ‘Sydney Airport: a noise annoys … at least till after the elections, Crikey, 26 May 2010

2 June 2010

Sydney Airport pricing determined

Minister Albanese announced that: ‘the Government has issued a new Declaration and Direction under the Trade Practices Act 1974 to secure access for regional airlines and reasonable pricing at Sydney Airport. This will mean that Sydney Airport cannot increase its charges for regional airlines above the Consumer Price Index. Further, Sydney Airport will be required to notify the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) of all proposed increases for regional airlines.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government), Securing regional airlines' access to Sydney Airport, media release, 2 June 2010.

24 June 2010

Regional air service price cap charges declared

In response to a question from Ms Kay Hull on airport charges, Minister Albanese said that: ‘The Government has extended the price capping arrangements for regional air services from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2013. Declaration No.92 and Direction No.32 extending the price capping arrangements for aeronautical services and facilities provided to regional air services were signed by the Minister for Competition Policy and Consumer Affairs, Craig Emerson, on 28 May 2010. These instruments replace Declaration No.91 and Direction No.30.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 6730, 24 June 2010.

11 September 2010

Following the 21 August 2010 election, Minister Albanese’s title changed to Minister for Infrastructure and Transport.

 

18 September 2010

High speed rail questioned

Minister Albanese said: ‘In terms of Sydney's airport needs, the Government's made it clear that we think that Sydney will need a second airport. High-speed rail won't solve all the issues in terms of access to the city. Aviation will continue to grow and expand, and all the studies have shown that Sydney will need a second airport. That's why we're having a study in conjunction with the New South Wales Government into a second airport as part of Sydney's growing transport infrastructure needs.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure and Transport), High speed rail; second Sydney airport; Transcript of doorstop interview: Marrickville, 18 September 2010.

29 November 2010

Planning Bill

The Airports Amendment Bill 2010 was passed by Parliament. It amended the Airports Act 1996 to give effect to the legislative reforms announced in the White Paper, in particular, to improve the planning regulatory framework.

House of Representatives, Debates, p.262, 30 September 2010.

9 December 2010

Productivity Commission to investigate airport pricing, services and investment

Minister Albanese announced: ‘The Gillard Labor Government has asked the Productivity Commission to investigate airport pricing, investment and services as part of a major public inquiry into the economic regulation of major Australian airports. We have brought this inquiry forward to shine a spotlight onto a range of charges at the nation's major airports including Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth. The inquiry is being brought forward from 2012 in response to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission's (ACCC) Airport Monitoring Report, which was released earlier this year.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure and Transport), and B Shorten (Assistant Treasurer), Airport Pricing, Investment and Services Review, media release, 9 December 2010.

8 March 2011

Sydney Airport Community Forum guidelines released

Minister Albanese announced: ‘the appointment of Peter Fitzgerald as the new chair of the Sydney Airport Community Forum (SACF), following the resignation of Barry Cotter.’ The Government also released guidelines for such consultation groups (p. 17) and Planning Forums. On 1 July 2011, the Airports (Building Control) Amendment Regulations 2011 amended the Airports (Building Control) Regulations 1996 (p. 14) to increase the fees payable for building applications at the leased federal airports including Sydney.

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure and Transport), New Chair for the Sydney Airport Community Forum, media release, 8 March 2011.

5 April 2011

Minister reaffirmed SSA need

Minister Albanese stated that: ‘More and more what that means is that one delay at the Airport will result in potential delays for passengers of up to five hours. Because the airports are interconnected, what that will mean over a period of time, unless there is a second airport to take some of the capacity into Sydney, is delays for passengers, inconvenience and a cost to economic growth and jobs as a result of that capacity constraint at Sydney Airport. That is why we need a second airport for Sydney sooner rather than later.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure and Transport), Sydney needs a second airport, transcript of press conference, 5 April 2011.

25 August 2011

Explosive Trace Detection Program progressed

Minister Albanese indicated that Sydney Airport would benefit from a $2.6 million boost to security through the Explosive Trace Detection (ETD) Program. The program would provide one ETD machine for every passenger screening lane at Sydney’s domestic and international terminals, to be rolled out by the end of the year. This followed an earlier trial.

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure and Transport), Increased security at Sydney Airport, media release, 25 August 2011.

2 March 2012

Joint Federal-NSW Study released on Meeting the Future Aviation Needs of Sydney to reaffirm the curfew, study a Wilton site but allow for initial regular public transport from RAAF Richmond

Minister Albanese presented an independent report Meeting the Future Aviation Needs of Sydney, initiated by the federal and New South Wales Governments, into the future aviation needs of Sydney. Referring to its findings, he said: ‘Firstly, the curfew and the cap at Sydney Airport will be maintained. The report speaks about an increase of the cap could go up to 85 per hour from the existing 80. The only reason why there can only be a minimal increase is because of the site constraints at the airport ... Secondly, we don't support Bankstown Airport being Sydney's second airport. Bankstown Airport has an important role to play in general aviation, but we don't support it being—through a process of stealth, becoming Sydney's second airport. We also maintain our position of opposition to an airport at Badgerys Creek. That was a commitment that we gave at the last two elections and we believe that's appropriate even though the report indicates that Badgerys Creek is its preferred site. The second preferred site of this study is Wilton; and the Government intends to examine the Wilton site. There would need to be a scoping study of that as the first step and I had discussions with the joint chairs of the report this morning on that ... For example, it explicitly rejects Canberra Airport, or any other airport such a distance from Sydney becoming the second airport, and effectively outlines why all international experience shows that that will not work. It also speaks about the increased needs for aviation capacity in other parts of the Greater Sydney region. In particular, the growth that's required in Newcastle and the Central Coast will require additional aviation capacity there. It also opens up the discussion about—in the short term there being some regular passenger transport services operating from the Richmond air base. But it outlines that Richmond can't be, due to capacity constraints and size restraints of the site, can't become Sydney's second airport because it could only take a very limited number of flights.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure and Transport), Meeting the Future Aviation Needs of Sydney, media release and press conference, 2 March 2012.

Department of Infrastructure and Transport, Joint study on aviation capacity in the Sydney region, report to Australian Government [and] NSW Government, 2012, pp. xvi, 380.

13 March 2012

Government committed to a SSA

In response to a question about a second Sydney Airport from Mr John Murphy, Minister Albanese stated that: ‘This month the federal and New South Wales governments received the most comprehensive independent study ever done into Sydney's and, therefore, Australia's aviation needs. The report makes it clear that Sydney needs a second airport sooner rather than later.’

House of Representatives, Debates, p. 2629, 13 March 2012.

20 March 2012

Productivity Commission airport inquiry released

The Productivity Commission conducted an inquiry into the economic regulation of Australian airports in 2011–12. The Government Response to the recommendations of the final report was also released on 30 March 2012. See also for background the paper: Flying high: A review of airport regulation in Australia, Infrastructure research note, Colonial First State Global Asset Management, April 2010.

Productivity Commission, Economic Regulation of Airport Services, Canberra, March 2012.

6 April 2012

New NSW Premier ruled out any SSA site near Sydney and preferred a high speed train link to Canberra

NSW Premier, Barry O'Farrell, ruled out a second airport ever being built near Sydney under a Coalition government, claiming the community should not have to put up with any more aircraft noise…Hailing the benefits of an express rail link to Canberra, the Premier also said no to lifting the Sydney Airport curfew and to easing the cap to allow more planes in … Mr O'Farrell's refusal to even consider the recommendations of the high-level task- force calling for urgent construction of a second site put him at odds with federal Transport Minister Anthony Albanese and federal shadow treasurer Joe Hockey. Both were against Badgerys Creek but supported a second airport at Wilton.

S Benson, Premier decides second Sydney airport won't fly, Daily Telegraph, 6 April 2012.

10 April 2012

Government rejected the SSA Canberra idea

Minister Albanese stated that: ‘The idea that a second airport for Sydney can be in Canberra is, as Joe Hockey says, absurd. The idea that people overseas will book a plane flight into Sydney and be told that they're actually going to Canberra, is like booking a plane ticket to New York, and landing in Washington DC. I mean, high speed rail is worthy of consideration, we're spending $20 million on a high speed rail study, but it does not, and the report written in part, co-authored by the New South Wales Government, it shows that it is not a solution to the second Sydney airport …. Any infrastructure project is difficult, but the report identifies Badgerys Creek, which the Government has also said that we wouldn't proceed with, and Wilton, as options for a second Sydney airport. We believe that Wilton is worthy of further consideration.’

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure and Transport), Second airport for Sydney; Transcript of interview with Philip Clark, 10 April 2012. See also Second Sydney airport, Transcript of interview with Alan Jones, 15 March 2012.

16 April 2012

NSW Premier maintained no Sydney basin SSA pledge

New South Wales Premier, Barry O'Farrell, stuck by an election promise not to build another airport inside the Sydney Basin. This had led to a clash with Minister Albanese. On 15 April, the NSW Premier said he would not support a second major airport for the Sydney Basin because of the cost of ancillary services and transport links, and because it would break an election pledge. Over the following weeks, the pledge generated considerable media commentary and outbursts from various persons interested in the ongoing debate.

P Sheehan, Albanese's first-class folly hijacks airport talk, Sydney Morning Herald, 16 April 2012; Second airport unrealistic: O'Farrell, Australian Financial Review 16 April 2012.

8 May 2012

Budget funded Wilton and RAAF Richmond study

In its 2012–13 Budget, the Government announced the intention to begin a detailed investigation of the suitability of Wilton as a SSA, while ensuring that Sydney Airport Corporation continued to invest in the existing main airport. The study would also assess the scope for RAAF Base Richmond to handle limited civil operations. The Minister wrote to Sydney Airport to develop a new Master Plan and initiated consultation requirements under its share sale.

A Albanese (Minister for Infrastructure and Transport), Time to Act on Sydney’s Aviation Capacity, media release, 08 May 2012.

18 May 2012

National Airports Safeguarding Framework

State Ministers agreed to a National Airports Safeguarding Framework, a national land use planning regime to protect airports and communities from inappropriate off-airport development, noting reservations from NSW on the format of the guideline for managing impacts of aircraft noise.

Standing Council on Transport & Infrastructure – Communiqué, 18 May 2012.

Departmental list of relevant legislation, regulations and readings

Aviation Policy & Regulation, 2011-12 Annual Regulatory Plan, Department of Infrastructure and Transport. Airport Curfew Dispensation Reports Tabled in Parliament 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, Airport Curfews Menu: Sydney, Adelaide, Coolangatta, Essendon, Airport Curfew Fact Sheet.

Legislation, Regulations and Guidelines: Aircraft Noise Regulations, Air Navigation Act 1920, Air Navigation Regulations 1947, International Airline Licence Guidance Notes, International Air Services Commission Act 1992, Ownership & Control of Leased Federal Airports, Airspace at Federal Airports, Family Assistance Code, Aviation Transport Security Act 2004, Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005, Air Accidents (Commonwealth Government Liability) Act 1963, Damage by Aircraft Act 1999, Civil Aviation (Carrier’s Liability) Act 1959, Civil Aviation (Carrier’s Liability) Regulations 1991. Sydney Airport Curfew Act 1995 Sydney Airport Demand Management Act 1997, Aircraft Noise Levy Act 1995, Aircraft Noise Levy Collection Act 1995, Air Passenger Ticket Levy (Imposition) Act 2001, Air Passenger Ticket Levy (Collection) Act 2001Airports Act 1996, Airports (On Airport Activities Administration) Validation Act 2010, Airspace Act 2007, Air Services Act 1995, Airspace (Consequentials and Other Measures) Act 2007

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