Census 2001


Research Paper Index

Research Paper no. 2 2002-03

Electorate Rankings: Census 2001

Andrew Kopras
Statistics Group
3 March 2003

Contents


Introduction
Main Features

List of Tables

Population
1 Total Population
2 Population Density
3 Australian Citizens Aged 18 Years and Over
4 Persons who were Visitors on Census Night
5 Persons who Changed Address Since 1991
6 Persons Aged Under 5 Years
7 Persons Aged Between 5 and 14 Years
8 Persons Aged Between 15 and 24 Years
9 Persons Aged Between 25 and 64 Years
10 Persons Aged 65 Years and Over
11 Median Age

Religion
12 Persons of Catholic Religion
13 Persons of Christian Religion
14 Persons of Non-Christian Religion
15 Persons of No Religion

Ethnicity
16 Persons of Indigenous Origin
17 Persons Born Overseas
18 Persons Born Overseas Resident Less Than 5 Years
19 Persons Born in United Kingdom and Ireland
20 Persons Born in Southern Europe
21 Persons Born in South East Asia
22 Persons Born in Non English Speaking Countries
23 Persons Not Fluent in English
24 Persons Speaking a Language Other Than English at Home

Families
25 Couple Families with Dependent Children
26 Couple Families with No Children
27 One Parent Families with Dependent Children
28 Lone Person Households

Income
29 Families with Weekly Income Below $500
30 Families with Weekly Income $1,500 and Above
31 Median Weekly Family Income

Labour Force
32 Employed Persons
33 Unemployed Persons
34 Unemployed Persons Aged 15 to 19 Years
35 Labour Force
36 Women in the Labour Force
37 Government Employees
38 Persons Employed in Agriculture
39 Persons Employed in Manufacturing
40 Government Employees
41 Professional Occupations
42 Tradespersons and Labourers
43 Persons Using Public Transport to Travel to Work

Education
44 Persons with Tertiary Education Qualifications
45 Persons with Trade Qualifications
46 Persons with No Qualifications
47 Persons Attending Infant, Primary or Secondary School
48 Persons Attending Non-Government Infants, Primary or Secondary School
49 Persons Attending a Tertiary Education Institution
50 Persons Who Left School Aged 15 Years or Under
51 Persons who Use a Computer at Home
52 Persons who Use Internet at Home

Dwellings
53 Rented Dwellings
54 Fully-Owned Dwellings
55 Dwellings being Purchased
56 Median Monthly Housing Loan Repayment
57 Median Weekly Rent
58 Dwellings with Two or more Motor Vehicles
59 Flat, Unit or Apartment Dwellings
60 Persons Residing in Non-Private Dwellings

Appendices
Appendix 1: Characteristics for States, Territories and Australia
Appendix 2: Characteristics for Electoral Regions


Introduction

This paper provides an analysis of socio-demographic data from the 2001 Census of Population and Housing for Commonwealth Electoral Divisions. The electoral boundaries used in this paper are those applicable at the 2001 Federal Election.

Data for each characteristic is presented in two tables. The first table lists each electoral division alphabetically and shows the value of the characteristic. The second table ranks each electoral division on the relative value of the characteristic (normally the characteristic expressed as per cent of total). The political party holding each division as at 1 January 2003 is also shown on each table.

The Main Features section of the paper shows how each characteristic is defined, including the definition of the relative value of the characteristic and contains a brief overview of the interesting points of each table. It also shows the Australian average of the characteristic in the table.

For comparison purposes the value and relative value of each characteristic for Australia and each State and Territory and for each electoral region are shown in the Appendices.

Further Information

The Census characteristics contained in this paper and electorate rankings based on other Census characteristics are available from the Parliamentary Library's Intranet site-http://libiis1/services/statistics/rankings.htm

Main Features

This section provides a summary of some of the more interesting features of each table.

Table 1-Total Population

Population in electoral division on Census night, 7 August 2001.

The division with the lowest total population is the Tasmanian rural division of Lyons (87 584), followed by the other four Tasmanian divisions. The Tasmanian divisions continue to exist due to the Constitutional provision guaranteeing a minimum of five seats to each Original State. The division with the highest total population is the inner-city division of Sydney (176 612). Divisions with a high proportion of their population not on the electoral roll (young people, overseas born, etc.) feature at the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic. The two divisions closest to the median population are outer-Sydney division of Berowra (124 101) and the inner-Melbourne division of Gellibrand (124 229).

Table 2-Population Density

Population of electoral division per square kilometre.

This table shows the greatest difference of all tables between lowest and highest ranked divisions. At one end of the scale are the rural divisions of Kalgoorlie (WA), Lingiari (NT) and Grey (SA) with 0.1 persons per square kilometre. On the opposite end are the inner-Sydney divisions of Grayndler and Wentworth with over 4500 persons per sq km. All 20 divisions with the highest population density are located in either Sydney or Melbourne. The Australian average is 2.5 persons per sq. km.

Table 3-Australian Citizens Aged 18 Years and Over

Ranked on Australian Citizens 18 years and over as a percentage of total population.

Divisions with high concentrations of children and recently arrived migrants were ranked lowest in this characteristic. The division with the lowest proportion is the inner-city division of Sydney (53.3 per cent) while the highest is the inner-Adelaide division of Hindmarsh (73.3 per cent). The Australian average is 65.0 per cent.

Table 4-Persons who were Visitors on Census Night

Persons who were counted away from their normal home or were an overseas visitor on the Census night. Ranked on visitors as a percentage of total population.

As to be expected, divisions with a significant tourism industry rated highly for this characteristic. Of the 20 divisions with the highest proportion of persons who were visitors on census night, 11 are in Queensland. The division with the lowest proportion is the outer-suburban Melbourne division of Scullin (2.0 per cent) while the highest is the Western Australia rural division of Kalgoorlie (22.2 per cent). The Australian average is 5.5 per cent.

Table 5-Persons who Changed Address Since 1996

Persons who were residing at a different address in 1996. Ranked on the percentage of persons who changed address since 1996 to total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 22 divisions with the lowest proportion of persons who changed address since 1996, 16 are held by the ALP. The divisions with the lowest proportion are mostly in Victoria and NSW while the divisions with the highest proportion are mainly in Queensland and Western Australia. In seven divisions more than 55 per cent of the population have changed address since 1996. The division with the lowest proportion is the Melbourne inner-suburban division of Maribyrnong (28.2 per cent) while the highest is the Queensland inner-metropolitan division of Brisbane (52.6 per cent). The Australian average is 39.9 per cent.

Table 6-Persons Aged Under 5 Years

Ranked on persons aged under five years as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 20 divisions with the lowest proportion of persons aged under five, 12 are held by the Coalition. Of the 20 divisions with the highest proportion of persons aged under five, 14 are outer-suburban divisions. The division with the lowest proportion is the inner-city division of Sydney (3.8 per cent) while the highest is outer-western suburban Sydney division of Chifley (8.9 per cent). The Australian average is 6.6 per cent.

Table 7-Persons Aged Between 5 and 14 Years

Ranked on persons aged between 5 and 14 years as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Outer-suburban divisions feature prominently with high proportions of this 5-14 year olds. The division with the lowest proportion is the inner-city division of Sydney (6.0 per cent) while the highest is the outer-western suburban Sydney division of Chifley (18.0 per cent). The Australian average is 14.2 per cent.

Table 8-Persons Aged Between 15 and 24 Years

Ranked on persons aged between 15 and 24 years as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Most National Party held divisions appear to be clustered at the lower end of the rankings for this characteristic, possibly reflecting limited employment and educational prospects for school leavers in rural divisions. Divisions with higher proportions of persons aged between 15 and 24 tend to include the locations of tertiary educational institutions. The division with the highest proportion is the Brisbane western suburbs division of Ryan (21.0 per cent) while the lowest is the NSW north coast division of Richmond (10.2 per cent). The Australian average is 13.7 per cent.

Table 9-Persons Aged Between 25 and 64 Years

Ranked on persons aged between 25 and 64 years as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 20 divisions with the lowest proportion of persons aged between 25 and 64, 13 are held by the Coalition. The division with the lowest proportion is the Toowoomba based division of Groom (48.8 per cent) whilst the highest is the inner-city division of Sydney (64.7 per cent). The Australian average is 52.8 per cent.

Table 10-Persons Aged 65 Years and Over

Ranked on persons aged 65 years and over as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 15 highest ranked divisions on the basis of proportion of persons aged 65 and over, only two are held by the ALP. Divisions containing popular retirement areas (coastal areas of NSW and Queensland) figure prominently at the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic. The division with the highest proportion is the inner-Adelaide division of Hindmarsh (20.6 per cent) while the lowest is the Northern Territory rural division of Lingiari (5.2 per cent). The Australian average is 12.6 per cent.

Table 11-Median Age

Age at which there are an equal number of people older and younger.

Of the 30 divisions with highest median age, 28 are held by the Coalition. Not surprisingly, divisions containing popular retirement areas feature at the higher end of the rankings while outer-suburban divisions feature at the lower end of the rankings. The divisions with equal lowest median age are Chifley (NSW), Lindsay (NSW), Lingiari (NT), Macarthur (NSW), Rankin (Qld) and Werriwa (NSW) (30 years) while the divisions with equal highest median age are Cowper (NSW), Fisher (Qld), Lyne (NSW) and Richmond (NSW) (41 years). The Australian median is 35 years.

Table 12-Persons of Catholic Religion

Ranked on persons of Catholic Religion as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 20 highest ranked divisions on the basis of proportion of persons of Catholic religion, 15 are held by the ALP. The division with the lowest proportion of persons of Catholic religion is the South Australian rural division of Wakefield (13.1 per cent) while the highest is the inner-suburban Melbourne division of Maribyrnong (45.6 per cent). The Australian average is 26.6 per cent.

Table 13-Persons of Christian Religion

Persons of Christian religion include: Anglican; Baptist; Brethren; Catholic; Churches of Christ; Jehovah's Witnesses; Latter Day Saints; Lutheran; Oriental Christian; Orthodox; Pentecostal; Presbyterian and Reformed; Salvation Army; Seventh-day Adventist; Uniting Church, Other Protestant and Other Christian. Ranked on persons of Christian Religion as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Most National Party held divisions feature at the higher end of the rankings (including five of the six highest) for this characteristic, reflecting the relatively low incidence of overseas born persons in rural divisions. The division with the highest proportion is the southern NSW rural division of Riverina (83.3 per cent) while the lowest is the inner-city division of Melbourne Ports (44.7 per cent). The Australian average is 68.0 per cent.

Table 14-Persons of Islam Religion

Ranked on persons of Islam religion as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 30 highest ranked divisions on the basis of proportion of persons of Islam religion, 26 are held by the ALP. Divisions with a high proportion of overseas born feature prominently at the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic. A number of non-metropolitan divisions share the lowest proportion of persons of Islam religion (0.1 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Sydney division of Reid (17.1 per cent). The Australian average is 1.5 per cent.

Table 15-Persons of No Religion

Ranked on persons who stipulated that they had no religion on the census form as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 40 lowest ranked divisions on the basis of proportion of persons of no religion, 33 are located in NSW. The division with the lowest proportion is the inner-Sydney division of Blaxland (5.7 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Adelaide division of Kingston (25.7 per cent). The Australian average is 15.5 per cent.

Table 16-Persons of Indigenous Origin

Persons who identified themselves as Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or both Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander on the census form. Ranked on Persons of Indigenous Origin as a percentage of total population.

Of the 20 divisions with the highest proportion of persons of Indigenous origin, only four are held by the ALP. Five divisions (Lingiari, Kalgoorlie, Leichhardt, Gwydir and Kennedy) have an Indigenous origin population proportion of over 10 per cent. Of the 25 divisions with the highest proportion of persons of Indigenous origin, only two are metropolitan divisions (Oxley in Brisbane and Chifley in Sydney). The division with the lowest proportion is the Sydney north shore division of Bradfield (0.1 per cent) while the highest is the rural Northern Territory division of Lingiari (37.2 per cent). The Australian average is 2.2 per cent.

Table 17-Persons Born Overseas

Ranked on persons born overseas as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 30 highest ranked divisions on the basis of proportion of persons born overseas, only seven are held by the Coalition. Reflecting migrant settlement patterns, the 47 highest ranked divisions are located in metropolitan areas while the 31 lowest ranked divisions are located in provincial or rural areas. The division with the lowest proportion is the central NSW rural division of Parkes (4.4 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Sydney division of Fowler (52.8 per cent). The Australian average is 21.9 per cent.

Table 18-Persons Born Overseas Resident Less Than 5 Years

Persons born overseas who have arrived in Australia in 1997 or later. Ranked on persons born overseas who have arrived in Australia in 1997 or later as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Most National Party held divisions feature at the lower end of the rankings (including the lowest) while the higher end of the ratings is dominated by ALP held divisions. The division with the lowest proportion is the central Victorian rural division of Gippsland (0.4 per cent) while the highest is the inner-city division of Sydney (10.2 per cent). The Australian average is 2.8 per cent.

Table 19-Persons Born in United Kingdom and Ireland

Ranked on persons born in the United Kingdom and Ireland as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 10 divisions with the lowest proportion of persons born in the United Kingdom and Ireland, five are held by the National Party. Divisions in South Australia and Western Australia feature prominently at the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic (16 of the highest 20 divisions are located in South Australia or Western Australia). The division with the lowest proportion of persons born in the UK and Ireland is the inner-Sydney division of Watson (1.6 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Perth division of Moore (20.4 per cent). The Australian average is 5.8 per cent.

Table 20-Persons Born in Southern and South Eastern Europe

Southern Europe includes Andorra, Gibraltar, Holy See, Italy, Malta, Portugal, San Marino and Spain, while South Eastern Europe includes Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Greece, Moldova, Romania, Slovenia, and Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Ranked on persons born in Southern and South Eastern Europe as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 20 divisions with the highest proportion of persons born in Southern and South Eastern Europe, 19 are held by the ALP. Metropolitan divisions (especially in Sydney and Melbourne) predominate at the higher end of the rankings while rural divisions predominate at the lower end of the rankings for this characteristic. The division with the lowest proportion of persons born in Southern and South Eastern Europe is the Central Queensland division of Capricornia (0.2 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Melbourne division of Maribyrnong (17.9 per cent). The Australian average is 3.4 per cent.

Table 21-Persons Born in South-East Asia

South-East Asia includes Brunei Darussalam, Burma (Myanmar), Cambodia, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. Ranked on persons born in South East Asia as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Most National Party held divisions feature at the lower end of the rankings while at the higher end of the rankings only one of the top 20 divisions is held by the Coalition. Similarly to the other ethnic origin tables, metropolitan divisions feature at the higher end of the rankings while rural divisions feature at the lower end. The division with the highest proportion of persons born in South-East Asia is Fowler, based on the Sydney suburb of Cabramatta. At 23.3 per cent, it has more than twice the proportion of persons born in South-East Asia than the next highest ranked division. The division with the lowest proportion is the central NSW rural division of Parkes (0.2 per cent). The Australian average is 2.6 per cent.

Table 22-Persons Born in Non-English Speaking Countries

Persons who were born overseas except in United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, United States of America, South Africa and New Zealand. Ranked on persons born in non-English speaking countries as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 30 divisions with the highest proportion of persons born in non-English speaking countries, only 3 are held by the Coalition, while the lower end of the ratings is dominated by National Party held divisions. Nine divisions, all in NSW or Victoria, have over one-third of their population born in a non-English speaking country. The division with the lowest proportion is the central NSW rural division of Parkes (1.9 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Sydney division of Fowler (49.7 per cent). The Australian average is 13.3 per cent.

Table 23-Persons Not Fluent in English

Persons who do not speak English or do not speak it well. Ranked on persons not fluent in English as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

The top 18 divisions with the highest proportion of persons not fluent in English are all held by the ALP. Four divisions have more than 10 per cent of their population not fluent in English. Eight divisions share the lowest proportion of persons not fluent in English (0.1 per cent) while the highest ranked is the outer-suburban Sydney division of Fowler (18.2 per cent). The Australian average is 2.3 per cent.

Table 24-Persons Speaking a Language Other Than English at Home

Ranked on persons speaking a language other than English at home as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 20 divisions with the highest proportion of persons speaking a language other than English at home, 19 are held by the ALP. In four NSW divisions (Reid, Blaxland, Watson and Fowler) more than half the population speaks a language other than English at home. The division with the lowest proportion is the Tasmanian rural division of Lyons (1.4 per cent) while the outer-suburban Sydney division of Fowler is the highest at 65.0 per cent. The Australian average is 15.2 per cent.

Table 25-Couple Families with Dependent Children

Family types consisting of two parents with one or more dependent offspring. Families that also have non-dependent offspring and other related individuals present are included. Ranked on couple families with dependent children as a percentage of total families.

As to be expected, outer-suburban divisions figure prominently in the rankings for the higher proportion of couple families with dependent children. The division with the lowest proportion is the inner-city division of Sydney (20.2 per cent) while the outer Melbourne division of Calwell is the highest (49.6 per cent). The Australian average is 38.6 per cent.

Table 26-Couple Families with No Children

Family types consisting of a couple with no dependent or non-dependent offspring. Families that also have other related individuals present are included. Ranked on couple families with no children as a percentage of total families.

Of the 30 divisions with the highest proportion of couple families with no children, only five are held by the ALP. The division with the lowest proportion is the western Sydney division of Chifley (22.3 per cent) while the highest is the inner-city division of Sydney (54.8 per cent). The Australian average is 35.7 per cent.

Table 27-One Parent Families with Dependent Children

Family types consisting of one parent and one or more dependent offspring. Families that also have non-dependent offspring and other related individuals present are included. Ranked on one parent families with dependent children as a percentage of total families.

Of the 20 divisions with the lowest proportion of one parent families with dependent children, sixteen are held by the Coalition. The division with the lowest proportion of one parent families with dependent children is the north-western Sydney division of Mitchell (5.5 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Adelaide division of Bonython (16.5 per cent). The Australian average is 10.7 per cent.

Table 28-Lone Person Households

Households consisting of a person living alone. Ranked on the percentage of lone person households to total households.

Inner-city divisions feature prominently at the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic while at the lower end outer-metropolitan divisions predominate. The division with the lowest proportion of lone person households is the the north-western Sydney division of Mitchell (11.1 per cent) while the highest is the inner-city division of Sydney (40.7 per cent). The Australian average is 24.0 per cent.

Table 29-Families with Weekly Income Below $500

Families with weekly income at August 2001 of $500 or less ($500 per week is about 60 per cent of average weekly earnings at August 2001). Ranked on families with weekly income below $500 as a percentage of total families (excluding families with income not stated).

Most National Party held divisions feature at the higher end of the rankings (including the five highest) reflecting the relatively low family incomes in rural divisions. The division with the lowest proportion is the Sydney north shore division of North Sydney (8.8 per cent) while the highest is the NSW north coast division of Cowper (39.8 per cent). The Australian average is 23.7 per cent.

Table 30-Families with Weekly Income $1500 and Above

Families with annual income at August 2001 of $1500 or more ($1500 per week is slightly less than twice the average weekly earnings at August 2001). Ranked on families with weekly income above $1500 as a percentage of total families (excluding families with income not stated).

Of the 20 divisions with the highest proportion of families with weekly income $1500 and above, only five are held by the ALP and two of these are the ACT divisions (Canberra and Fraser). Sydney's north shore and Melbourne's eastern suburbs divisions dominate the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic. The division with the lowest proportion is the NSW north coast division of Cowper (9.5 per cent) while the highest is the Sydney north shore division of North Sydney (62.6 per cent). The Australian average is 25.0 per cent.

Table 31-Median Family Income

Weekly family income level at which there are an equal number of families above and below that level.

Of the 20 divisions with the highest median family income, only five are held by the ALP. Rural divisions figure prominently in the rankings for low median family income while for high median family income divisions in the north shore of Sydney and the eastern suburbs of Melbourne are prominent. Eight divisions have a median family income of over $1500 per week. The division with the lowest median family income is the NSW north coast division of Cowper ($618 per week) while the highest is the Sydney north shore division of North Sydney ($1792 per week). The Australian median is $937 per week.

Table 32-Employed Persons

Ranked on the employment ratio which is employed persons as a percentage of population aged 15 years and over.

Of the 20 divisions with the highest employment ratio, only four are held by the ALP and two of these are the ACT divisions (Canberra and Fraser). Thirty-three divisions have an employment ratio of over 60 per cent. The division with the lowest employment ratio is the outer-suburban Sydney division of Fowler (42.3 per cent) while the highest is outer-southern Sydney division of Hughes (69.4 per cent). The Australian average is 55.9 per cent.

Table 33-Unemployed Persons

Ranked on the unemployment rate which is unemployed persons as a percentage of the labour force.

Of the 20 divisions ranked lowest on the basis of the unemployment rate, only two are held by the ALP. Eight divisions have an unemployment rate of under 4 per cent while six divisions have an unemployment rate of over 12 per cent. The division with the lowest unemployment rate is Sydney north shore division of Mackellar (3.2 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Sydney division of Fowler (15.1 per cent). The Australian average is 7.4 per cent.

Table 34-Unemployed Persons Aged 15 to 19

Ranked on the unemployment rate for persons aged 15 to 19 which is unemployed persons aged 15 to 19 years as a percentage of the labour force aged 15 to 19 years.

Of the 20 divisions ranked lowest on this basis, only two are held by the ALP. Six divisions (all Sydney suburban based divisions) have an unemployment rate for persons aged 15 to 19 of under 10 per cent. The division with the lowest unemployment rate for persons aged 15 to 19 is the Sydney north shore division of Mackellar (7.5 per cent) while the highest is the NSW provincial division of Newcastle (25.0 per cent). The Australian average is 16.7 per cent.

Table 35-Labour Force

Includes employed and unemployed persons. Ranked on the labour force participation rate which is persons in the labour force as a percentage of the population aged 15 years and over.

Of the 20 divisions with the highest labour force participation rate, 16 are held by the Coalition. Four divisions (Lyne, Cowper and Richmond on NSW north coast and the outer-suburban Sydney division of Fowler) have a labour force participation rate under 50 per cent, while four divisions (Dickson, Canberra, Mitchell and Hughes) have a rate over 70 per cent. The division with the lowest labour force participation rate is NSW north coast division of Lyne (48.4 per cent) while the highest is the outer-southern Sydney division of Hughes (71.9 per cent). The Australian average is 60.3 per cent.

Table 36-Women in the Labour Force

Ranked on women in the labour force as a percentage of total labour force.

Rural divisions feature at the lower end of the rankings for this characteristic, reflecting more limited employment opportunities for women in rural areas. The division with the lowest proportion of women in the labour force is the Western Australia rural division of Kalgoorlie (38.0 per cent) while the highest is the inner-city division of Wentworth (48.4 per cent). The Australian average is 44.9 per cent.

Table 37-Government Employees

Employees of the Commonwealth, State and Local Governments. Ranked on government employees as a percentage of total employment.

The divisions with the highest proportion of government employees are the ACT divisions of Canberra (39.1 per cent) and Fraser (42.6 per cent) followed by the Northern Territory division of Solomon (32.1 per cent). The division with the lowest proportion of government employees is the the Dandenong based division of Holt (8.6 per cent). The Australian average is 16.2 per cent.

Table 38-Persons Employed in Agriculture

Ranked on persons employed in agriculture, forestry and fishing as a percentage of total employment.

Sixteen divisions with the highest proportion of persons employed in agriculture are held either by the Coalition (6 of these by the National Party) or by an Independent. As to be expected, rural divisions dominate the higher end of the rankings while metropolitan divisions dominate the lower end. Reflecting the high degree of urbanisation of Australia, 74 (just under half) divisions have less than 1 per cent of persons employed in agriculture. Ten divisions share the lowest proportion ranking of this characteristic (0.2 per cent) while the highest ranked is the WA rural division of O'Connor (26.7 per cent). The Australian average is 4.0 per cent.

Table 39-Persons Employed in Manufacturing

Ranked on persons employed in manufacturing as a percentage of total employment.

The top 17 highest ranked divisions for the proportion of persons employed in manufacturing are all held by the ALP. Ten divisions have more than 20 per cent of persons employed in manufacturing. The division with the lowest proportion is the north Canberra division of Fraser (3.1 per cent) while the highest is the Dandenong based division of Holt (28.5 per cent). The Australian average is 12.2 per cent.

Table 40-Persons Employed in Tourism

Persons employed in accommodation, cafes and restaurants industry. Ranked on persons employed in tourism as a percentage of total employment.

Inner city and coastal divisions feature at the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic while outer-suburban divisions feature at the lower end. The division with the lowest proportion is the outer Melbourne division of Casey (2.8 per cent) while the highest is the North Queensland division of Leichhardt (10.9 per cent). The Australian average is 4.9 per cent.

Table 41-Professional Occupations

Includes managers, administrators and professionals (Census Occupation codes 1 and 2). Ranked on persons in professional employment as a percentage of total employment.

Of the 20 divisions with the lowest proportion of persons with professional occupations, only two are held by the Coalition, while only seven of the 20 divisions with the highest proportion are held by the ALP. The division with the lowest proportion is the outer-suburban Adelaide division of Bonython (12.6 per cent) while the highest is the Sydney north shore division of North Sydney (51.5 per cent). The Australian average is 27.5 per cent.

Table 42-Tradespersons and Labourers

Includes tradespersons, labourers and related workers (Census Occupation codes 4 and 9). Ranked on tradespersons and labourers as a percentage of total employment.

Of the 20 divisions with the lowest proportion of tradespersons and labourers, only seven are held by the ALP. Two divisions (Bonython in SA and Fowler in NSW) have more than 30 per cent of persons employed as a tradesperson or labourer. The division with the lowest proportion is the Sydney north shore division of North Sydney (6.3 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Sydney division of Fowler (31.3 per cent). The Australian average is 20.9 per cent.

Table 43-Persons Using Public Transport to Travel to Work

Persons who have used public transport, i.e. train, bus, tram or ferry as one of the modes of travelling to work. (Note that a person may have used more than one mode of transport.) Ranked on persons using public transport to travel to work as a percentage of total employed persons.

Most National Party held divisions feature at the lower end of the rankings. As to be expected, rural divisions are concentrated at the lower end of the rankings and inner-city divisions at the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic. Reflecting Australia's reliance on the private motor vehicle, only five divisions (all in Sydney) have a proportion of more than 25 per cent. The division with the lowest proportion is the western Victorian rural division of Wannon (0.4 per cent) while the highest is the inner-Sydney division of Grayndler (33.8 per cent). The Australian average is 8.9 per cent.

Table 44-Persons with Tertiary Education Qualifications

Persons whose highest education qualification obtained is a degree or higher, or a diploma. Ranked on persons with tertiary education qualifications as a percentage of the population aged 15 years and over.

Divisions at the lower end of the rankings tend to be rural or outer-metropolitan while at the higher end Sydney north shore and Melbourne eastern suburban divisions feature. The division with the lowest proportion of persons with tertiary education qualifications is the outer-suburban Adelaide division of Bonython (6.5 per cent) while the highest is the inner-city division of North Sydney (44.5 per cent). The Australian average is 18.9 per cent.

Table 45-Persons with Trade Qualifications

Persons whose highest education qualification obtained is Certificate Level. Ranked on persons with trade qualifications as a percentage of the population aged 15 years and over.

Of the 25 divisions with the highest proportion of persons with trade qualifications, only six are held by the ALP. The division with the lowest proportion is the inner-city division of Melbourne (7.8 per cent) while the highest is the outer-southern Sydney division of Hughes (22.1 per cent). The Australian average is 15.8 per cent.

Table 46-Persons with No Qualifications

Persons aged 15 years and over who did not complete any non-school qualifications. Ranked on persons with no qualifications as a percentage of the population aged 15 years and over.

Of the 20 divisions with the lowest proportion of persons with no qualifications, only five are held by the ALP. The division with the lowest proportion of persons with no qualifications is the inner-city division of North Sydney (33.3 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Adelaide division of Bonython (68.7 per cent). The Australian average is 53.8 per cent.

Table 47-Persons Attending Infant, Primary or Secondary School

Ranked on persons attending infant, primary or secondary school as a percentage of total population.

The proportion of persons attending infant, primary or secondary school in the highest ranked division (the outer-suburban Melbourne division of McEwen, 20.7 per cent) is over four times that of the lowest ranked division (the inner-city division of Sydney, 4.9 per cent). Outer-suburban divisions figure prominently at the higher end of the rankings this characteristic, while inner-city divisions dominate the lower end of the rankings. The Australian average is 16.2 per cent.

Table 48-Persons Attending Non-Government Infant, Primary or Secondary School

Persons attending Catholic and other non-government infant, primary or secondary schools. Ranked on persons attending non-government infant, primary or secondary schools as a percentage of total persons attending these schools.

The proportion of persons attending non-government schools in the highest ranked division (the inner-city division of Wentworth, 70.7 per cent) is over four times that of the lowest ranked division (the Queensland rural division of Wide Bay, 15.0 per cent). There are 10 divisions (all inner-metropolitan) with more than 50 per cent of persons attending non-government schools. The Australian average is 32.2 per cent.

Table 49-Persons Attending a Tertiary Education Institution

Persons attending a TAFE college, CAE or university. Ranked on persons attending a tertiary education institution as a percentage of total population.

Of the 30 divisions with the lowest proportion of persons attending a tertiary education institution, only four are held by ALP. Most National Party held divisions feature at the lower end of the ranking, reflecting the absence of tertiary education institutions in rural areas. At the higher end of the rankings, divisions containing tertiary education institutions are prominent. The division with the lowest proportion is the north Queensland rural division of Kennedy (2.6 per cent) while the highest is the inner-city division of Melbourne (17.0 per cent). The Australian average is 6.5 per cent.

Table 50-Persons whose Highest Level of Schooling Completed was Year 10 or Below

Ranked on persons whose highest level of schooling completed was year 10 or below as a percentage of the population aged 15 and over.

Of the 20 divisions with the lowest proportion of persons whose highest level of schooling completed was year 10 or below, nine are held by the ALP and two of these are the ACT divisions (Canberra and Fraser). There are six divisions with the proportion of over 60 per cent. The division with the lowest proportion is the inner-eastern suburban Melbourne division of Higgins (16.0 per cent) while the highest is the Tasmanian division of Braddon (62.9 per cent). The Australian average is 40.6 per cent.

Table 51-Persons Who Use a Computer at Home

Ranked on persons who use a computer at home as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 20 divisions with the highest proportion of persons who use a computer at home, only two are held by the ALP and these are the ACT divisions of Canberra and Fraser. The division with the lowest proportion of persons who use a computer at home is the Northern Territory division of Lingiari (24.0 per cent) while the highest is the Sydney north shore division of Bradfield (62.7 per cent). The Australian average is 42.0 per cent.

Table 52-Persons Who Use Internet at Home

Persons who use internet at home, whether or not also using it at their work or elsewhere. Ranked on persons who use internet at home as a percentage of total population (excluding overseas visitors).

Of the 20 divisions with the highest proportion of persons who use internet at home, only two are held by the ALP and these are the ACT divisions of Canberra and Fraser. Rural divisions figure prominently at the lower end of the rankings for this characteristic, reflecting the difficulty of obtaining internet services in those areas. The division with the lowest proportion of persons who use internet at home is the Northern Territory division of Lingiari (15.4 per cent) while the highest is the Sydney north shore division of Bradfield (49.3 per cent). The Australian average is 27.7 per cent.

Table 53-Rented Dwellings

Dwellings whose tenure type is rented (from all sources). Ranked on rented dwellings as a percentage of total occupied private dwellings.

Of the 22 divisions with the lowest proportion of rented dwellings, only six are held by the ALP. The division with the lowest proportion is the outer-eastern suburban Melbourne division of Aston (11.6 per cent) while the highest is the inner-city division Sydney (51.0 per cent). The Australian average is 26.3 per cent.

Table 54-Fully-Owned Dwellings

Dwellings whose tenure type is fully owned. Ranked on the number of fully owned dwellings as a percentage of total occupied private dwellings.

Of the 23 divisions with the lowest proportion of fully owned dwellings, only seven are held by the Coalition. Rural divisions and older established Metropolitan divisions feature at the higher end of the rankings. Five divisions have a fully owned dwelling proportion over 50 per cent. The division with the lowest proportion of fully owned dwellings is the inner-city division Sydney (17.6 per cent) while the highest is the outer-eastern suburban Melbourne division of Menzies (57.0 per cent). The Australian average is 39.7 per cent.

Table 55-Dwellings being Purchased

Dwellings whose tenure type is being purchased or being purchased under a rent/buy scheme. Ranked on the number of dwellings being purchased as a percentage of total occupied private dwellings.

Outer-metropolitan divisions dominate the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic while inner-metropolitan and rural divisions dominate the lower end of the rankings. The division with the lowest proportion is the inner-city Sydney division of Wentworth (12.8 per cent) while the highest is the outer-suburban Perth division of Cowan (45.4 per cent). The Australian average is 26.5 per cent.

Table 56-Median Monthly Housing Loan Repayment

Monthly housing loan repayment level at which there are an equal number of dwellings being purchased above and below that level.

Of the 20 divisions ranked highest on the basis of median monthly housing loan repayment only seven are held by the ALP. Reflecting the Sydney property market, only four of the 20 divisions ranked highest are located outside Sydney. The median monthly housing loan repayment for the highest ranked division (the Sydney north shore division of Bradfield, $1965) is almost four times that of the lowest division (the rural SA division of Grey, $551). The Australian median is $870.

Table 57-Median Weekly Rent

Weekly rent level at which there are an equal number of rented dwellings above and below that level.

Of the 20 divisions with the highest median weekly rent, only six are held by the ALP. Similar to the loan repayments rankings, Sydney divisions dominate the higher end of the rankings for rent payments. The division with the lowest median weekly rent is the NT rural division of Lingiari ($82) while the highest is the Sydney north shore division of Bradfield ($374). The Australian median is $154.

Table 58-Dwellings with Two or More Motor Vehicle

Dwellings where two or more registered motor vehicles owned or used by the occupants of the dwelling were garaged or parked near the dwelling. Ranked on the number of dwellings with two or more motor vehicles as a percentage of total occupied private dwellings.

Of the 15 divisions with the lowest proportion of dwellings with two or more motor vehicles, only two are held by the Coalition, while at the higher end of the rankings only four of the top 17 divisions are held by the ALP. Inner-metropolitan divisions feature at the lower end of the rankings while outer-metropolitan and rural divisions dominate the higher end. The division with the lowest proportion is the inner-city division of Sydney (13.6 per cent) while the highest is the north-western Sydney division of Mitchell (69.1 per cent). The Australian average is 45.5 per cent.

Table 59-Flat, Unit or Apartment Dwellings

Flat, unit or apartment dwellings ranked on the percentage of total private dwellings.

As to be expected, inner-city divisions dominate the higher end of the rankings for this characteristic while five out of six lowest ranked divisions are in outer-suburban Perth. Four divisions (Sydney, Wentworth, Melbourne Ports and North Sydney) have a proportion of over 50 per cent. The division with the lowest proportion is the outer-suburban Perth division of Pearce (1.0 per cent) while the highest is the inner-city division of Sydney (62.8 per cent). The Australian average is 13.1 per cent.

Table 60-Persons Residing in Non-Private Dwellings

Non-private dwellings include hotels, motels, nurses' and other staff quarters, boarding houses, boarding schools, residential colleges, nursing homes, prisons, religious and charitable institutions, hospitals and other communal dwellings (but not self-care units in accommodation for the retired or aged). Ranked on the persons residing in non-private dwellings as percentage of total persons.

Outer-metropolitan divisions dominate the lower end of the rankings for this characteristic while at the higher end of the rankings, inner city and divisions with mining and tourism industries predominate. Six divisions have a proportion of over 10 per cent. Four divisions (Chifley, Cowan, Dickson and Rankin) share the lowest proportion of persons residing in non-private dwellings (0.5 per cent) while the highest is the inner-city division of Sydney (15.5 per cent). The Australian average is 3.2 per cent.

 

Appendix 1: Characteristics for States, Territories and Australia

Appendix 2: Characteristics for Electoral Regions

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