New South Wales Election 1999

 Research Paper 22 1998-99

New South Wales Election 1999

Scott Bennett
Politics and Public Administration Group

Gerard Newman
Statistics Group
8 June 1999

Contents

Symbols and Abbreviations
Introduction
New South Wales goes to the polls
Background to the election: leadership
The campaign battle
Legislative Assembly
Legislative Council
Percentages for parties winning Legislative Council seats
The verdict
Endnotes
Table 1: Legislative Assembly, State Summary
Table2a: Legislative Assembly, District Summary
Table2b: Legislative Assembly, District Summary
Table 3: Legislative Assembly, District Summary
Table 4: Electoral Pendulum
Table 5 Legislative Assembly: District Summary
Table 6: Legislative Council, State Summary
Table 7: Legislative Council, Composition by Year of Election
Table 8: Legislative Assembly By-elections 1995-1999
Table 9: Legislative Assembly Elections 1950-1999

Symbols and Abbreviations

AAFI

Australians Against Further Immigration

AD

Australian Democrats

ALP

Australian Labor Party

CDP

Christian Democratic Party

CEC

Citizens Electoral Councils

CPA

Communist Party

DSL

Democratic Socialists

ERP

Euthanasia Reform Party

ES

Earthsave

GOSH

Gun Owners and Sporting Hunters Rights

GRN

The Greens

IND

Independents

IP

Re-elect Ivan Petch

LP

Liberal Party

NBC

No Badgerys Creek Airport

NCP

Non Custodial Parents Party

NLP

Natural Law Party

NP

National Party

ORP

Outdoor Recreation Party

PF

People First

PHON

Pauline Hanson's One Nation

PV

Peoples Voice

R2P

Republic 2001 Party

SEP

Socialist Equity Party

TCW

Timbarra Clear Water Party

UNI

Unity

*

Sitting member for District

#

Party holding or notionally holding District

Introduction

The 1999 New South Wales election saw the Labor Government of Bob Carr increase its small majority in the Legislative Assembly to one that should enable it to govern comfortably over the next four years. Although the Government does not control the upper house, the Legislative Council election has produced a house that will probably be more amenable to Labor legislation than its predecessor. On the Coalition side, the Liberal Party has been seriously weakened and it may take some time before new leader, Kerry Chikarovski, is in a position to challenge the Government electorally. Although the National Party vote declined, the party still holds the lion's share of rural seats.

This paper provides a brief outline of the election campaign, discusses the results, notes the seats of significance, and speculates about the position of the parties in the immediate future.

New South Wales goes to the polls

The 1999 New South Wales election was held on 27 March, the date at which the fixed four-year term of the parliament ended. The Legislative Assembly had been reduced from 99 to 93 seats, the second reduction since the election of 1988. Fifteen electorates had been abolished:

Ashfield (ALP), Badgerys Creek (ALP), Broken Hill (ALP), Bulli (ALP), Eastwood (LP), Ermington (LP), Gladesville (ALP), Gordon (LP), Hurstville (ALP), Murray (NP), Moorebank (ALP), Northcott (LP), St Marys (ALP), Sutherland (LP), Waratah (ALP).

Nine new electorates were created (notional sitting party given):(1)

Epping (LP), Heathcote (ALP), Hornsby (LP), Macquarie Fields (ALP), Menai (LP), Mulgoa (ALP), Murray-Darling (NP), Ryde (LP), Wentworthville (ALP).

The electorate of Murwillumbah had been renamed Tweed (NP).

Also on 27 March voters elected 21 Members of the 42-member Legislative Council for a term of eight years.

Background to the election: leadership

In his seminal work on Australian voting behaviour, Don Aitkin asserted that, 'There can be no doubt that the electorate prizes unity in its parties', and went on to note that the electorate 'is alert to any signs of party or cabinet disunity'.(2) Despite this, there have been a number of occasions when State parties have moved, on the eve of a State election, to remove a leader deemed to be leading the party to electoral defeat. The Liberals' removal of Tom Lewis (1976) and John Mason (1981) (both NSW) and Dick Hamer (1981) (Vic), and the Nationals' deposing of Mike Ahern (1989) (Qld) have been the most significant in the past two decades. Typically, poor opinion poll results are cited as justification of such moves against a leader. A variant was the removal of Labor's Doug Lowe (1981) (Tas), an event which helped precipitate a premature election. Aitkin's warning was relevant to all cases-the party that had made this late change lost the forthcoming election.(3)

In the cases mentioned, the date of the following election was uncertain, though close. In New South Wales in 1999, the parliament had a fixed term, so the parties knew the election date of 27 March. Despite this, as late as 11 December 1998, Liberal leader Peter Collins was forced from office by the supporters of Kerry Chikarovski. Just over a month later, on 14 January 1999, Ian Armstrong was replaced by George Souris as leader of the National Party. This was just over ten weeks from polling day, quite long enough, said Souris, to mount a successful campaign.

The Government was certainly vulnerable. In 1995 it won office with just 41.3 per cent of the first preference vote to the Coalition's 43.9 per cent, the lowest winning total since 1927, and with less than half of the two-party preferred vote. It won 50 of the Legislative Assembly's 99 seats. Within a few months its popularity had fallen to below 40 per cent, following its breaking of a promise to remove motorway tolls in western Sydney. Soon after the March 1996 Commonwealth election its popularity had dropped further to barely 30 per cent in the wake of the change in location of the Governor's residence and of the controversial dismissal of the head of the Department of Community Services. Between mid-1996 and early 1997 the Coalition under Collins had a healthy lead in the polls, though the Premier's own popularity was higher than the Liberal leader's. Labor only really began to match the Coalition during 1998 and throughout the year there was little in the poll margins.(4)

The campaign battle

It is a matter of fine judgment how early/late a party should issue its policies prior to polling day. Labor portrayed itself as 'getting on with the job' of government and not prepared to be diverted from this until the formal launch of its policies on 14 March, a stance that was not seriously challenged. The Liberals, by contrast, came under media pressure to unveil their policies right from the election of Chikarovski and were criticised for many weeks for being 'policy-free', despite the Liberal promise to reveal policies at the formal opening of its campaign-on the same day as Labor. Despite this apparent embargo on policies, both sides did gradually make clear some of their policies in the weeks prior to the policy launches.

There is a settled pattern to most State elections. Governments stand on their record, make a plea for being given another term 'to finish the job' and criticise their opponents for the extravagance of their claims. Oppositions have a tendency to produce a 'shopping list' of promises, as they seek to put together a set of policies broad enough to attract a majority of voters.(5) This election was no different, with the unusual aspect being the Coalition's public recognition that its promises would cost more than those made by the Government. In fact, it was forecast that the Coalition promises would see a Coalition government outspend Labor by a margin of five to one, a margin not disputed by either of the Coalition partners.(6)

As a consequence, there were relatively few promises made by the Government, though it spoke of more money for emergency services and for hospitals in western Sydney and in the country. By comparison, the Coalition emphasised an environment energy fund, more money for hospitals, a rural health boost, more dental services and a plan to scrap the controversial hotel bed tax. It made wide-ranging education promises and pledged to remove the controversial land tax on land worth more than $1.1m. The policy that caught most attention was a plan to privatise the production of electricity and to give each family $1000 cash or $1100 in shares from the proceeds.

In a move reminiscent of Coalition policies in the Wran years, much emphasis was placed on law and order, presumably in response to survey findings-a Herald AC Nielsen poll gave law and order as the issue that concerned the highest number of voters (23 per cent).(7) What was different on this occasion, however, was the Government's obvious determination not to be outbid by its rivals. Whereas the Coalition emphasised such matters as the employment of 2,500 extra police, the dedication of police to crime 'hot spots', the tougher treatment of graffiti crime and the establishment of 'grid' sentencing under a policy of 'zero tolerance', the Government spoke of being tougher on paedophilia and establishing new sentencing guidelines in areas of serious crime. Some of this law and order vote-bidding involved some controversial ideas: the Coalition proposal to gaol first-time graffiti vandals, for instance.

Oppositions often struggle to catch the campaign headlines-thus we have the heavy emphasis on staged media events and of the ubiquitous 'photo-opportunity'. In an effort to be heard, policy gimmicks are often thrown up to catch attention. The Coalition had its share: an 'employee ombudsman' to work to move employees to individual contracts and hence reduce union power, was an example. Others included a 10-day wilderness trek as an alternative to expulsion from school, and a 'community cadet scheme', which proposed a work-force of uniformed teenagers undertaking volunteer community work wherever required. The most controversial was a plan to force young offenders to wear fluorescent jackets branded 'Community service', while undertaking compulsory community work. This was a proposal which produced criticism from the ACT Liberal Chief Minister, Kate Carnell, herself critical of a similar shaming exercise in Canberra a few years earlier.(8)

Carnell's intervention was one of a number of distractions during the campaign that Chikarovski could have done without. Some were of potential importance, such as the difficulties caused by errors in the detail surrounding the electricity privatisation proposal, or of threats by MPs Peter Blackmore (Lib) and Mark Kersten (NP) not to support the legislation in the Parliament, or the National Party calls in late January to end the Coalition. The failure of talk-back radio hosts, such as Alan Jones, to wholeheartedly accept the Liberal leader, was another frustration. Three days before polling day, New South Wales Liberal director, Remo Nogarotto, was forced to apologise to former leader Peter Collins, for describing his leadership as 'three years of public humiliation'. Rather more bizarre was the need to respond to publicity given to call-back radio claims that the Liberal Party had touched up its Chikarovski television advertisements to make her eyes blue in colour.(9)

Governments can have a difficult task in breaking through voter resistance as they attempt to increase voter support, something that the Carr Government, with its three-seat majority, was keen to achieve. It was reported that Labor's strategy was to run a 'positive' campaign, with four main features. There was to be an apology from the Premier for any mistakes that had been made, followed by the claim that Labor was 'achieving more than you realise' and then a restatement of its achievements. Overriding everything else, the Leader of the Opposition was not to be attacked.(10) This strategy was adhered to, making it difficult for the Opposition to engage with the Government-the Premier even refusing a television debate with Chikarovski.

The image, then, was of a government in control, smoothly moving toward victory over an unsettled opponent, yet there were various problems which seemed to argue against an inevitable victory. Labor's land tax support brought heated opposition from HALT (Home-Owners Against Land Tax), its native vegetation and water management legislation had antagonised country interests and it even had to face front-page revelations concerning cockroaches infesting a major Sydney hospital in the middle of the campaign.

Quite close to polling day, media discussion tended to talk of a possible narrow parliamentary margin.(11) To an important extent, though, such predictions overlooked the evidence of the opinion polls. Even though the State-wide figures for the parties remained reasonably close, the election seemed to be won quite a long way out from polling day when opinion polls were indicating an overwhelming Government lead in Sydney. In mid-March, for instance, the Herald AC Nielsen poll had city voters favouring Labor by 13 percentage points, whereas Newspoll's State-wide margin was just two points.(12) If the former poll's figures were duplicated in Sydney on election day, and if the normally Labor-supporting Newcastle and Illawarra electorates voted for the Government as well, then Labor was likely to win comfortably and votes in rural areas were likely to be irrelevant to the result.

Legislative Assembly

The outcome

Labor's vote of 42.2 per cent barely rose from the 1995 figure (41.3%). The party won 55 of the 93 seats, compared with 50 of 99 seats in 1995. This was the third-lowest Labor vote since 1950-in fact, its four lowest post-War results have been in the past four elections, in which it has averaged just 40.3 per cent of first preferences. The heady days of 1953 when the party gained well over half the vote (55%), or 1978 (57.8%) or 1981 (55.7%), seemed long past, suggesting that the newspaper headline, 'Victory echoes ALP's Wranslide', was based on a shallow understanding of what has happened to the major parties in New South Wales.(13)

Tables 1 and 2a suggest that the opinion polls showing a clear Labor lead in the capital were accurate. Labor's 45.2 per cent was 13.1 per cent ahead of the Liberal Party, while in the provincial areas the gap was a massive 25.7 per cent. All but four of Labor's Assembly seats were won in the conurbation running from Newcastle through Sydney to the Illawarra, and bordered by the Blue Mountains.

The seats that 'changed hands' (based on notional allocation following the redistribution) were as follows:

Liberal losses to ALP

Georges River, Maitland, Menai, Miranda, Ryde, South Coast, Strathfield

Liberal loss to NP

Burrinjuck

National losses to ALP

Murray-Darling, Tweed

National losses to Independent

Dubbo, Northern Tablelands

Although Labor's vote remained static, its main rivals did not fare as well. The Liberal Party's 24.8 per cent (-8.0%) was the party's lowest New South Wales vote since its formation, even lower than its 27 per cent in the first Wran re-election (1978). Proportionally, its 20 seats (21% of the Assembly) was its fourth-worst effort on record. The National Party's 8.9 per cent of primaries (-2.2%) was its third-lowest effort since the 1920s, but its 13 seats out of a total of 93 (14%) was not markedly out of alignment with previous years-it held 17 per cent of seats after the previous election. The total Coalition vote (33.7%) was a great deal less than its 49.1 per cent in 1968, or its 49.5 per cent in 1988.

The combined major party vote declined to 75.9 per cent, a drop of 9.3 per cent on the 1995 result, the poorest such figure since the collapse of the United Australia Party prior to the 1944 election. The 1976 major party vote of 96.1 per cent was but a distant memory. The 1999 figure reflected recent voter shifts elsewhere in Australian elections.(14) Between them, the Greens, Australian Democrats and Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (PHON) gained nearly 15 per cent of the vote. Lesser groups and independents also ate into the major party vote, securing nearly 10 per cent. Independent MLAs retained Bligh and Tamworth and independent candidates won Northern Tablelands, Dubbo and Manly, the last of which had been held by an independent.

The PHON vote of 7.5 per cent was lower than the party's New South Wales vote of 9 per cent in the 1998 Commonwealth election, and well behind the 22.7 per cent gained in the Queensland election. Despite this, all three elections have indicated that there might be a core PHON vote in some rural areas. In Barwon, Bega, Dubbo, Murray-Darling and Oxley, for instance, the party's vote ranged between 13.0 and 20.5 per cent. The rural PHON vote seems to be higher north and north-west of Sydney than elsewhere in the State. There might also be a core PHON support in some seats on the fringe of urban areas, that was seen in Cessnock, Charlestown, Port Stephens, Swansea and Wallsend, where the vote ranged from 10.2 to 16.1 per cent. If the next Commonwealth election is close, PHON preferences may well be very important in a significant number of Queensland and New South Wales seats.

Electorates of interest

Albury

It is rare that a local issue becomes a possible factor in a national election, but the controversial question of the proposed Albury by-pass featured in the 1998 Commonwealth election. National leader, Tim Fischer, bore the brunt of local unhappiness over this issue in his seat of Farrer, suffering a reduction in his first preference vote of 13.4 per cent. This issue was still of importance in the New South Wales election, with independent candidate, Claire Douglas, campaigning on this issue against the Liberals' Ian Glachen. Douglas won over one-third of first preferences, but despite appearing to have won on election night, lost the seat on preferences by 687 votes.

Bathurst

Bathurst was the Government's most marginal seat, with a margin of just 0.6 per cent. With the sitting member not contesting the seat, the National Party believed it had a good chance of victory. Despite Labor's generally mediocre rural vote, Gerard Martin enjoyed an increase in primary votes of 5.7 per cent, and won on first preferences (51.0 per cent).

Burrinjuck

The seat of Burrinjuck was held for the ALP by the Sheehans, father and son, from 1950 until 1988, when it was won for the Liberals by Alby Schultz. With Schultz elected to the House of Representatives in October 1998, Burrinjuck became a battle between the three major parties, with Gloria Schultz attempting to replace her husband. Despite trailing Labor's Michael McManus by 7.6 per cent on first preferences, Katrina Hodgkinson (NP) eventually won by 817 votes. Schultz gained a vote of 16.7 per cent.

Clarence

Former MHR for Page (1990-6) and Labor's Minister for Rural Affairs, Harry Woods, won the usually safe National Party seat of Clarence in a surprise 1996 by-election victory. The general press consensus seemed to be that the Nationals would regain the seat in 1999, and so it appeared during much of the count. At the end of counting, however, Woods (36.9% of first preferences) defeated Grafton councillor, Steve Cansdell (25.4%), by just 143 votes.

Dubbo

Dubbo was supposed to be the eighth-safest Opposition seat. Held by the Nationals' Gerry Peacocke since 1981, it was not the type of seat expected to fall. With Peacocke's resignation, Tony McGrane, Mayor of Dubbo for the previous eight years, temporarily stood down from office to nominate as an independent candidate, one of three high-profile mayors to contest seats in the election. After a re-count, McGrane won the seat by just 14 votes, the closest result in the State.

Georges River

Opposition spokesperson on the environment, Marie Ficarra, was one of three Liberal front-benchers to lose their seats. She had been a member of the Legislative Assembly since 1995, but suffered in the 1998 redistribution when her 1995 margin of 8 per cent was trimmed to the point where a swing of two per cent would see her defeated. Georges River thus became the third most marginal Opposition seat. In an election where Labor performed best in Sydney seats, it came as no surprise that Ficarra was swept away by a two-party preferred swing against her of 8.3 per cent.

Gosford

Gosford was one of the key seats that the Neville Wran-led Labor Party won in 1976 when the party returned after 11 years in the political wilderness. The seat has been held by the Liberal Party's Chris Hartcher since the Coalition victory in 1988. On this occasion, Hartcher was challenged by Barry Cohen, the 63-year-old former Labor member for the Commonwealth seat of Robertson (1969-90). Cohen had the reputation of being an excellent campaigner, but on this occasion his swing of 3.2 per cent was not enough to overcome Hartcher's cushion of 5.5 per cent.

Maitland

Peter Blackmore held the Coalition's most marginal seat, where a swing of less than one per cent would see him lose to Labor's John Price. Alert to the unpopularity of electricity privatisation in an electorate where many of the State's power workers resided, Blackmore had stated that he could not support privatisation legislation, were his party to move in that direction. Blackmore limited the swing to just 1.9 per cent, but lost his seat after a tense period of counting, by a margin of 755 votes.

Manly

After a long history as a solid non-Labor seat, Manly broke the mould with the election of an independent in 1962. The seat reverted to the Liberals in 1968, went to Labor ten years later, back to the Liberals in 1984 and to another independent, Peter Macdonald, in 1991. With the retirement of Macdonald, this was seen as a Liberal must-win seat if Labor was to be turned out of office. The Opposition attempted to make this certain with a promise to construct a tunnel under the Spit Bridge. The McDonald-supported independent, David Barr (30.2%), trailed Liberal candidate Darren Jones by 8.5 per cent on first preferences, but after the distribution of preferences won by 145 votes.

Miranda

Ron Phillips, Liberal deputy leader and treasury spokesman, first won Miranda in 1984. He held the re-shaped electorate by a notional margin of 5.3 per cent after the redistribution. Media reports spoke of his having antagonised some voters over his role in the pre-selection battle for the federal seat of Cook, which ousted Stephen Mutch for Bruce Baird, but Phillips' future seemed assured. Despite this, Labor's Barry Collier led him on first preferences by 2.3 per cent, and won comfortably after the allocation of preferences with a vote of 52.3 per cent.

Monaro

Monaro is a rural seat with an important urban segment in the city of Queanbeyan. Held by Labor during the Wran years, the National Party's Peter Cochran had turned it into a very safe Coalition seat, which required a swing of 16.3 per cent to fall to Labor. Following Cochran's resignation, Monaro was contested by the three major parties, PHON, the Greens and the high-profile mayor of Queanbeyan as an independent. The presence of Liberal and PHON candidates stripped the National first preference vote by 35.7 per cent, leaving Peter Webb trailing Labor's John Durst by 9.3 per cent. After a tense count, Webb won the seat by just 128 votes.

Northern Tablelands

This very safe National seat had a 14.6 per cent cushion against a swing to Labor. The Nationals lost the seat, however, when their first preference vote fell by 18.7 per cent, with voters turning to Richard Torbay, three-term mayor of Armidale and foundation member of the Country Summit Alliance (see below).

Ryde

The Liberal seat of Ermington held by Opposition transport spokesman, Michael Photios, and the Labor seat of Gladesville, held by John Watkins, were abolished in the redistribution. Both MLAs nominated for the new seat of Ryde, made up of voters from those two electorates as well as over 12,000 from Eastwood. Muddying the waters for Photios was the independent candidacy of former Liberal MLA for Gladesville (1988-95), Ivan Petch. Described as 'probably the best homeground campaigner in the business',(15) Photios was, nonetheless, defeated comfortably, barely winning one-third of the vote to his opponent's 44.1 per cent. Despite Liberal claims that the Petch campaign (8.5%) brought about their defeat, the combined Photios-Petch first preference tally was still two per cent behind the Labor vote.

Strathfield

Modern-day redistributions have the tendency to treat some sitting members quite roughly. Minister for Police Paul Whelan, MLA for Ashfield since 1976, found his seat abolished in the 1998 redistribution. Whelan unsuccessfully sought a safe seat, with his party effectively leaving him with little choice but to challenge Bruce MacCarthy in the Liberal seat of Strathfield, a seat which required a swing of 2.7 per cent. Reportedly pessimistic about his chances, Whelan campaigned vigorously, and won comfortably after leading his opponent by over 11 per cent on first preferences.

Tamworth

Tony Windsor has held this seat as an independent MLA since 1991. In this election his 69.4 per cent of first preferences was the highest in the State, and his after-preference vote was a remarkable 85.2 per cent.

Tweed

Tweed was the re-named seat of Murwillumbah. With a notional margin of 2.2 per cent it was the Nationals' most marginal seat. The sitting member, Don Beck, had been MLA for Byron (1984-8), and Murwillumbah since 1988. The Labor Party had tried hard to defeat him in the past, but he had withstood each challenge. In 1999, Labor was represented by Neville Newell, MHR for Richmond from 1990, when he had defeated National's federal leader, Charles Blunt, until his defeat in 1996. That unexpected victory was regarded as a measure of how much this former solid National region had altered, with the influx of many new residents. This presumably aided Newell on this occasion, as he led the sitting member by 3.5 per cent on first preferences and 2.6 per cent at the end of counting.

Legislative Council

The Legislative Council election proved to be the most controversial since the first general election held in 1981. New South Wales upper house elections are conducted with the State used as a single electorate-as in Senate elections. When the Single Transferable Vote method of proportional representation is used, the larger the number of members of parliament to be elected from the single electorate, the easier it is for minor party and independent candidates to gain election. In half-Senate elections where six are to be elected, a candidate needs a quota of 14.3 per cent of first and later preferences to be elected; by contrast, in this election with 21 to be elected, a candidate needed just 4.5 per cent.

It was clear that many in the community had grasped the possibility that this created. With a total of only 30 candidates being run by the Labor, Liberal and National parties, 233 non-major party candidates nominated, creating the so-called 'tablecloth' ballot paper. While it is presumably the case that some candidates seriously sought election, it is also clear that many took the opportunity to use the election to gain publicity for their cause. Parties such as the Euthanasia Referendum Party, People Against Paedophiles, the No Badgerys Creek Airport Party and the Timbarra Clean Water Party were examples of groups using the occasion to put themselves before a State-wide audience. Others effectively ridiculed the whole exercise, forming groups with names that included the What's Doing? Party, the Three Day Weekend Party or Make Billionaires Pay More Tax!

With so many names on the ballot paper, and with the combined major party vote likely to be less than the Legislative Assembly return, it was clear that the major parties would fall well short of winning all Legislative Council seats. In the event, less than two-thirds of the vote (64.7 per cent) was cast for major party candidates, 11.2 per cent less than in the lower house election. Labor's vote of 37.3 per cent (+2 per cent) won it 8 seats and the Liberal/National ticket, which received a vote of 27.4 (-11.1 per cent) garnered 6 seats. The remaining seven were divided between familiar and unfamiliar parties and groups. Of the former, Pauline Hanson's One Nation, the Australian Democrats, the Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group) and The Greens all won a seat. The new parliamentary players included Reform the Legal System (whose 1 per cent may have been donkey-vote-dominated, the result of being on the left-hand end of the ballot paper), the Unity Party ('dedicated to maintaining and enhancing an Australia that is truly multicultural'(16)), and the Outdoor Recreation Party. The controversial PHON leader, David Oldfield, was third MLC elected, on a party vote of 6.3 per cent (2.3 more than the Democrats), but with few preferences flowing to the party PHON was unable to gain a second seat. The last MLC to be elected was the veteran, Fred Nile, of the Christian Democratic Party who had been first elected in 1981.

John Tingle-The Shooters Party, and A Better Future for Our Children, which were already represented in the Legislative Council, missed out on a second seat. The Tingle group received the seventh highest total of votes (1.7%) but did not receive enough preferences from other groups and parties to win a seat. The independent MLA for Tamworth, Tony Windsor, had played a key role in the creation of the Country Summit Alliance, a rural-based group seeking 'equity with the city'. Windsor spoke of the Alliance distributing 800,000 Legislative Council how-to-vote cards, and predicted that it would win 2-4 seats, but its nine-member ticket failed to secure even a single per cent of the vote, and no seats were won.(17) The convenor of Republic 2001/People First, Glenn Druery, gained publicity for his efforts to tie up the preferences of a large number of the tiny groups, leading David Nason of the Australian to write admiringly of his 'mastery of the political numbers game', which made Druery's election 'seemingly a formality'. The group's 3,076 votes (0.09%) suggested that Mr Druery forgot about the need to campaign for enough first preferences to make the securing of second preferences a relevant factor in the outcome.(18)

The Government thus had 16 of the 42 MLCs, 6 short of a majority, with the Coalition holding 13 seats, 9 of these held by the Liberal Party. The presence in the Legislative Council of Richard Jones (Ind), two Greens, an Australian Democrat, the Reform the Legal System, and A Better Future For Our Children possibly makes the Government's task of getting its legislation through the upper house slightly easier than in the previous parliament (see Table 7).

In the days after the Legislative Council election, there were criticisms made of 'parties' being able to win a seat on a miniscule vote.

Percentages for parties winning Legislative Council seats

Party

%

ALP

37.3

L/NP

27.4

PHON

6.3

AD

4.0

Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group)

3.2

The Greens

2.9

Reform the Legal System

1.0

Unity

1.0

Outdoor Recreation Party

0.2

There has been discussion about altering the electoral arrangements to make it much harder for such non-major party candidates to gain seats. Achieving such an outcome will be difficult. Although the three major parties have the numbers to push such legislation through the Parliament if they choose to combine forces, there would then have to be a referendum voted on by all electors. The result of such a referendum might depend upon how controversial the Legislative Council had been in the meantime.

The verdict

The Government

It has been noted of State politics that if strong governments appear to be in control of events, and if they appear more competent than their rivals, then they can often dig in for long periods.(19) This can be seen in New South Wales, which has had only four changes of government since 1941, and where governments have been able to entrench themselves: Labor from 1941 to 1965, the Coalition from 1965 to 1976 and Labor from 1976 to 1988. In addition, Labor has had a long-term edge over the Coalition, winning 14 of 20 elections since 1941. During that period, strong leadership from Premiers such as McKell (1941-47), Cahill (1951-9) and Wran (1976-86), which emphasised 'political astuteness and pragmatism', has made Labor Governments very difficult to defeat.(20)

This type of analysis also seems to help explain the Carr Government's return to power. The comfortable lead in the polls that Labor enjoyed throughout the campaign period,(21) suggests that the Sydney Morning Herald may have been close to the mark, when suggesting that the Premier retained his position, 'because of his Government's first-term record of generally competent management of the affairs of the State'.(22) Mike Steketee of the Weekend Australian described the Government as politically surefooted, being 'never loath to reverse an unpopular decision or argue that what was white last week was now black'. An important illustration of this had been the change of mind over the issue of privatisation of electricity production, a controversial proposal which had initially been favoured by both the Premier and the Treasurer.(23) Hugh Mackay has also noted that survey evidence suggested that many Sydney (as distinct from rural) voters were satisfied with the Government's performance: 'Sydney's buzzing, and that's good news for incumbent governments, both here [in New South Wales] and in Canberra'.(24)

The Coalition

Despite both new leaders talking about new directions and a revived sense of purpose for their parties, it is likely that the changes to the leadership simply signalled to voters a general unhappiness in Coalition ranks. Mackay suggested that the changes simply made each new leader look like a 'backstabber', and that they sent voters the message that the parties were desperate: 'When the Coalition parties changed the leaders of both their parties, they cut their own throats'.(25) In early 1999 the poll position had been close enough for Malcolm Mackerras to wonder if the parliamentary balance of power would be held by two independents. In less than two months, however, there was poll evidence of a growing voter resistance to the appeals of the Liberal leader. On March 2, for instance, the Sydney Morning Herald reported poll findings that gave Chikarovski an approval rating of just 28 per cent, a figure only one per cent higher than Peter Collins' lowest reading. The poll also suggested an increase in her disapproval rating by 17 per cent to 42 per cent.(26)

The Liberal leader had made heavy weather of some announcements. She was criticised for her threat made to the Governor of a forced return to living in Government House and her uncertainty over the details of the party's electricity privatisation policy seemed to suggest a lack of preparation. The Liberal Party was forced to remove five advertisements through errors and misstatements contained within them, further suggesting a party that was unprepared for the election battle, despite having known the election date, a point made by the Bulletin's Laurie Oakes.(27) This was a view held by the Prime Minister, who attributed his party's poor performance in his home State to the fact that the former leader and his front bench team had been 'out to lunch', when they should have been hard at work in the preparation of policy. (28)

Liberal views of the final result were varied. Remo Nogarotto spoke of the 'phenomenal' Chikarovski campaign, and the Prime Minister now spoke of the Liberal organisation having 'performed magnificently', yet Andrew Fraser MLA (NP) believed the leadership changes to have been fatal for the Coalition's chances. Most spectacularly, the Victorian Premier Kennett criticised the campaign and the change of leadership and suggested that both Chikarovski and Nogarotto should lose their positions.(29)

In May 1999 the Liberal Party announced a six week inquiry by federal director, Lynton Crosby, into the reasons for the party's defeat.

Three-cornered contests

Various National Party members complained about the deleterious impact upon the Coalition campaign of three-cornered contests, once a staple part of Coalition campaigning, but much less reliable with the optional preferential voting method in use in New South Wales (and Queensland).(30) In this election there were seven cases. In the seats of Bathurst, where Labor won on first preferences, The Entrance, where the National vote was so low (9.5%) as to not be a factor, and Lismore, where Labor was well behind on first preferences, the three-cornered contest did not develop as the theory would suggest.

In Burrinjuck and Monaro, Labor was well ahead on first preferences and the Coalition votes (and others) helped pull the National candidate over the line. Although the three-cornered contest tactic was thus successful, it is certainly arguable that the National margin was much closer than it might have been had just the one Coalition candidate been standing. In Wagga Wagga the three-cornered contest worked perfectly. Labor topped the poll (26.3%) but the Liberal (25.4%) and National (22.9%) exchange of preferences produced a comfortable Liberal victory.

It was in Clarence, that National Party criticisms had most validity, for Minister Woods almost certainly retained the seat because of the three-cornered nature of the contest. The Liberal, Bill Day, had 7,794 votes before his exclusion, 7,004 of which had been Liberal first preferences. Of the 7,794 votes to be transferred, 2,358 (30.3%) exhausted.(31) If there had been just a single Coalition candidate, a clear majority of Liberal first preferences would have gone to the National Party candidate, Steve Cansdell. As Woods won by just 143 votes after the distribution of preferences, it is highly likely that the contest between Coalition partners was crucial in accounting for the result.

The future

Although the Labor vote was not particularly high (see Table 1), the party is well-placed as a result of the 1999 election, particularly as it dominates the all-important Sydney voting area. Thirty-four of its 55 seats are in the capital and these are buttressed by safe seats in the Illawarra, Newcastle and Central Coast regions. In 2003, a loss of 9 seats would see Labor lose control of the Assembly but this would leave the balance of power in the hands of independents. The Liberal and National Parties would only be certain of controlling the lower house in the following circumstances:

  • If all independents retained their seats, 14 seats would need to be taken from Labor. This would require a two-party preferred vote in the 14 most marginal Labor seats of up to 9.7 per cent;
  • If one independent seat was won, 13 seats would need to be taken from Labor. This would require a two-party preferred vote in the 13 most marginal Labor seats of up to 9.4 per cent;
  • If two independent seats were won, 12 seats would need to be taken from Labor. This would require a two-party preferred vote in the 12 most marginal Labor seats of up to 8.4 per cent;
  • If three independent seats were won, 11 seats would need to be taken from Labor. This would require a two-party preferred vote in the 11 most marginal Labor seats of up to 7.9 per cent;
  • If four independent seats were won, 10 seats would need to be taken from Labor. This would require a two-party preferred vote in the 10 most marginal Labor seats of up to 7.5 per cent;
  • If all five independent seats were won, 9 seats would need to be taken from Labor. This would require a two-party preferred vote in the 9 most marginal Labor seats of up to 6.6 per cent. This would also require, however, a massive increase in the National Party vote in Tamworth, an eventuality that would seem likely only in the absence of Tony Windsor.

In the election of 1978 the Coalition vote dropped by 9.4 per cent, while ten years later the Labor vote fell 10.3 per cent, so the shaking-loose of sufficient Labor votes over the next four years is not an impossible target. A steady performance by the second Carr Government would, however, make it very difficult to achieve.

The Liberal Party's position is on a par with its poor performances of 1978 and 1981. Thirteen of its 20 seats are in Sydney, with eleven of those on Sydney's north shore. Outside of the capital it holds Bega, Wagga Wagga and Albury, plus a few seats on the fringe of Sydney.

Country New South Wales is still dominated by the National Party, which holds 13 of 25 rural seats, with Dubbo and Clarence almost within its grasp. Its vote of 8.9 per cent is a reminder of the poor 7.9 per cent the party gained in New South Wales in the 1998 Commonwealth election, and must continue to be of concern to party members. Some voices, including former leader, Ian Armstrong, have called for the party to leave the Coalition, but George Souris has withstood such pressure for the time being.(32)

Endnotes

  1. All notional margins in this paper are from Antony Green, 1997/98 NSW Redistribution: Analysis of Final Boundaries, NSW Parliamentary Library Research Service, Background Paper No. 4/98.
  2. Don Aitkin, Stability and change in Australian politics, Australian National University Press, Canberra, 1977.
  3. Scott Bennett, Affairs of State: Politics in the Australian States and Territories, Allen and Unwin, Sydney, 1992, p. 191.
  4. Australian, 15 February 1999.
  5. Scott Bennett, 'Parties and elections', in Brian Galligan (ed), Australian State Politics, Longman Cheshire, Melbourne, 1986, p. 221.
  6. Australian, 25 March 1999.
  7. Sydney Morning Herald, 26 March 1999.
  8. Australian, 26 March 1999.
  9. Canberra Times, 8 March 1999; Weekend Australian, 30-31 January 1999; Australian, 25 March 1999; Daily Telegraph, 23 January 1999.
  10. Sydney Morning Herald, Australian, 29 March 1999.
  11. 'A large late swing against the Carr Government has set the stage for a tight contest in today's NSW election', Mike Steketee in Weekend Australian, 27-28 March 1999.
  12. Sydney Morning Herald, 26 March 1999; Weekend Australian, 27-28 March 1999.
  13. Sydney Morning Herald, 29 March 1999.
  14. Scott Bennett, 'The Decline in Support for the Major Parties and the Prospect of Minority Government', Research Paper No. 10, Department of the Parliamentary Library, Information and Research Services, 1998-99.
  15. Sydney Morning Herald, 26 March 1999.
  16. http://www.edoz.com.au/unitynsw/
  17. Weekend Australian, 12-13 December 1998, Sydney Morning Herald, 2 March 1999.
  18. Australian, 19 March 1999.
  19. Bennett, 'Parties and elections', p. 220.
  20. See David Clune, The New South Wales State Election 1953, New South Wales Parliamentary Library and Department of Government, University of Sydney, [1996?], p. 27.
  21. This was almost total. The only exception was a particular Newspoll finding which suggested a four point Coalition lead in January-February. This was so much out of kilter with other polls that it probably can be discounted, see Australian, 24 February 1999.
  22. Sydney Morning Herald, 29, 30 March 1999.
  23. Weekend Australian, 27-28 March 1999.
  24. Sydney Morning Herald, 30 March 1999.
  25. ibid.
  26. Malcolm Mackerras, 'Power pivots on Independent pair', Australian, 2 February 1999; Sydney Morning Herald, 2 March 1999.
  27. Laurie Oakes, 'Blonde ambition', Bulletin, 30 March 1999, p. 49.
  28. Weekend Australian, 3-4 April 1999.
  29. Sydney Morning Herald, 29 March 1999.
  30. For three-cornered contests, see Scott Bennett, Winning and Losing: Australian National Elections, Melbourne, Melbourne University Press, 1996, pp. 51-3.
  31. When optional preferential voting is used, ballot papers with no second (or later) preferences are set aside as 'exhausted' votes, or in other words, the votes 'exhaust'.
  32. Sydney Morning Herald, 29 March 1999.

Table 1: Legislative Assembly, State Summary

Candidates

Seats Won

First Preference Votes

Swing

%

Number

Per cent

Australian Labor Party

93

55

1 575 858

42.18

+0.92

Liberal Party

77

20

927 368

24.82

-8.02

National Party

23

13

331 343

8.87

-2.23

Pauline Hanson's One Nation

88

281 147

7.53

+7.53

The Greens

81

144 894

3.88

+1.31

Australian Democrats

75

124 529

3.33

+0.48

Christian Democratic Party

42

55 813

1.49

+0.05

Unity

28

39 562

1.06

+1.06

Australians Against Further Immigration

63

34 594

0.93

-0.18

Earthsave

14

6 391

0.17

+0.17

Re-elect Ivan Petch

1

3 494

0.09

+0.09

Citizens Electoral Councils

12

3 416

0.09

+0.09

Democratic Socialists

10

3 404

0.09

+0.02

Outdoor Recreation Party

9

3 347

0.09

+0.09

Non-Custodial Parents Party

20

2 700

0.07

+0.07

No Badgerys Creek Airport

1

1 196

0.03

+0.03

Gun Owners and Sporting Hunters

2

885

0.02

+0.02

Timbarra Clean Waters Party

4

887

0.02

+0.02

Euthanasia Referendum Party

3

774

0.02

+0.02

Communist Party

1

549

0.01

+0.01

Natural Law Party

5

508

0.01

-0.20

Republic 2001 Party

1

450

0.01

+0.01

Socialist Equity Party

2

402

0.01

+0.01

People First

3

387

0.01

+0.01

Peoples Voice

1

248

0.01

+0.01

Independents

73

5

190 933

5.11

-1.46

Formal Votes

3 736 079

97.49

+2.64

Informal Votes

96 044

2.51

-2.64

Turnout/Total Votes

732

93

3 832 123

93.10

-0.70

Enrolled

4 116 059

Table 2a: Legislative Assembly, District Summary

First Preference Votes, Number

District

ALP

LP

NP

PHON

AD

Others

Formal

Informal

Turnout

Enrolled

Albury

6703

16374

1731

13272

38080

583

38663

41571

Auburn

24207

8031

2536

1148

4768

40690

1581

42271

45150

Ballina

11071

20391

1675

5795

38932

805

39737

43298

Bankstown

26519

5755

2327

751

3609

38961

1840

40801

44744

Barwon

9554

19994

7988

1085

415

39036

669

39705

43149

Bathurst

20375

5394

6018

3020

660

4476

39943

799

40742

42729

Baulkham Hills

13206

19737

1825

2861

3551

41180

1016

42196

44571

Bega

12562

18253

5200

1751

2150

39916

678

40594

43473

Blacktown

22714

8260

3953

3178

3392

41497

1497

42994

45799

Bligh

12153

8140

17771

38064

883

38947

45282

Blue Mountains

18474

11464

2777

2944

5479

41138

702

41840

44625

Burrinjuck

14580

6589

11574

4523

657

1694

39617

672

40289

42787

Cabramatta

18859

3141

1954

505

13820

38279

1652

39931

43295

Camden

15888

18566

3809

4204

42467

1067

43534

46153

Campbelltown

21414

8353

3630

1639

4066

39102

1133

40235

43012

Canterbury

22302

6686

1114

1137

8217

39456

1783

41239

44741

Cessnock

21966

6003

6462

5809

40240

760

41000

43239

Charlestown

22300

9078

4157

5211

40746

878

41624

43689

Clarence

14524

7004

10019

4263

518

3074

39402

594

39996

42363

Coffs Harbour

11970

18043

4409

2361

2359

39142

692

39834

42709

Coogee

18901

12498

910

2180

3781

38270

761

39031

43492

Cronulla

14123

18160

3057

1148

3936

40424

892

41316

44412

Davidson

8583

23394

1531

2424

4657

40589

837

41426

44616

Drummoyne

19253

13475

1679

1806

5088

41301

1325

42626

45476

Dubbo

8016

12597

7166

593

11201

39573

756

40329

42678

East Hills

20146

7926

4369

1003

7463

40907

1444

42351

44795

Epping

11937

17862

1274

2638

6805

40516

660

41176

44490

Fairfield

23362

5629

2929

662

6308

38890

1911

40801

43865

Georges River

19548

15285

2193

4450

41476

972

42448

45286

Gosford

16720

18136

2172

1413

3301

41742

824

42566

45985

Granville

22330

11631

3599

2103

39663

1489

41152

44216

Hawkesbury

10058

19202

3777

1914

5556

40507

938

41445

44233

Heathcote

19274

12401

3400

1379

4666

41120

784

41904

44122

Heffron

23492

7205

1615

1476

3282

37070

1440

38510

42157

Hornsby

13966

16976

1679

2012

6682

41315

982

42297

45519

Illawarra

20370

6492

3576

2017

7674

40129

1160

41289

43600

Keira

18293

4527

2678

14783

40281

866

41147

43750

Kiama

20236

8936

3765

1363

6637

40937

1018

41955

44281

Kogarah

19628

14226

1752

5302

40908

1308

42216

45576

Ku-ring-gai

8241

22708

1416

3769

4181

40315

710

41025

44417

Lachlan

11385

22798

5383

1124

689

41379

854

42233

44521

Lake Macquarie

22821

9333

5073

4412

41639

898

42537

45039

Lakemba

24457

6588

1487

1181

4975

38688

1463

40151

43470

Lane Cove

12911

19896

1092

3665

2417

39981

958

40939

44607

Lismore

10779

5260

15238

1270

6360

38907

725

39632

42271

Liverpool

26754

6773

3546

2878

39951

1682

41633

45093

Londonderry

19369

9877

4406

1305

4570

39527

1494

41021

44248

Macquarie Fields

25223

8512

3660

1226

2120

40741

1361

42102

45578

Maitland

18563

17729

3452

766

2769

43279

619

43898

45716

Table2a: Legislative Assembly, District Summary

First Preference Votes, Number continued

District

ALP

LP

NP

PHON

AD

Others

Formal

Informal

Turnout

Enrolled

Manly

6705

15424

1595

1004

15078

39806

869

40675

44004

Maroubra

23393

9523

1926

1292

3312

39446

1187

40633

44129

Marrickville

21311

5351

1661

3425

7884

39632

1370

41002

45834

Menai

18048

15434

3360

1216

3689

41747

1242

42989

45574

Miranda

16996

16099

2842

1460

2232

39629

805

40434

42842

Monaro

12076

7521

8477

2855

7195

38124

885

39009

42227

Mount Druitt

23820

6399

3458

1517

4736

39930

1467

41397

44532

Mulgoa

21413

9772

3569

1282

4267

40303

1555

41858

44706

Murray-Darling

16781

13790

6238

792

387

37988

727

38715

42706

Murrumbidgee

13225

22024

3378

1546

271

40444

875

41319

45059

Myall Lakes

11922

20841

5522

2308

40593

701

41294

43712

Newcastle

21644

8208

3468

1802

5645

40767

1101

41868

45039

North Shore

10888

20994

867

3121

3089

38959

686

39645

44665

Northern Tablelands

3598

13381

2770

1092

18408

39249

509

39758

42355

Orange

12878

16566

5036

1059

4326

39865

824

40689

42982

Oxley

9548

14187

7366

1089

6918

39108

770

39878

42546

Parramatta

21466

12023

1953

1280

3291

40013

1094

41107

45193

Peats

20451

12803

2767

1598

3324

40943

1040

41983

44549

Penrith

21467

10154

3523

933

4259

40336

1243

41579

44323

Pittwater

7938

20918

1955

4719

4677

40207

897

41104

44626

Port Jackson

21582

7359

735

2993

7403

40072

1390

41462

46377

Port Macquarie

10815

22471

4832

1976

40094

636

40730

43060

Port Stephens

18415

9650

5247

1345

5689

40346

932

41278

43840

Riverstone

23148

10779

3964

1908

2360

42159

1216

43375

46132

Rockdale

22258

11003

2185

1087

3299

39832

1629

41461

44815

Ryde

18169

13853

1023

1551

6624

41220

1151

42371

45383

Smithfield

25276

8924

2352

956

3036

40544

1483

42027

44952

South Coast

16543

16425

4274

3943

41185

757

41942

44769

Southern Highlands

13527

17614

4055

1225

3272

39693

833

40526

43149

Strathfield

18386

13623

1365

1800

5883

41057

1277

42334

46002

Swansea

21152

9712

5469

1671

3338

41342

922

42264

44451

Tamworth

5029

4701

2718

28182

40630

520

41150

43606

The Entrance

19526

11404

3909

2861

1167

2410

41277

936

42213

44841

The Hills

10876

21954

1606

2963

5597

42996

974

43970

47272

Tweed

17713

16315

945

5132

40105

834

40939

44768

Upper Hunter

12450

19307

5030

2491

39278

756

40034

42206

Vaucluse

10244

20271

791

2269

4102

37677

860

38537

43642

Wagga Wagga

10391

10032

9052

3147

1071

5864

39557

695

40252

43098

Wakehurst

11455

19278

2684

2583

3816

39816

1219

41035

44123

Wallsend

24424

8265

4878

4918

42485

1061

43546

45751

Wentworthville

21250

11071

2609

1132

4418

40480

1341

41821

44675

Willoughby

11262

20327

895

3048

4504

40036

954

40990

44775

Wollongong

24713

6153

2185

6372

39423

1368

40791

43467

Wyong

22606

11233

4004

1199

2731

41773

1038

42811

45414

Total

1576858

927368

331343

281147

124529

494834

3736079

96044

3832123

4116059

Regions

Metropolitan

926169

657426

117437

84546

262174

2047752

61772

2109524

2280991

Provincial

352674

159476

13559

62806

19470

90502

698487

16123

714610

757276

Rural

298015

110466

317784

100904

20513

142158

989840

18149

1007989

1077792

Table2b: Legislative Assembly, District Summary

First Preference Votes, Per cent

District

ALP

LP

NP

PHON

AD

Others

Formal

Informal

Turnout

Albury

17.6

43.0

4.5

34.9

98.5

1.5

93.0

Auburn

59.5

19.7

6.2

2.8

11.7

96.3

3.7

93.6

Ballina

28.4

52.4

4.3

14.9

98.0

2.0

91.8

Bankstown

68.1

14.8

6.0

1.9

9.3

95.5

4.5

91.2

Barwon

24.5

51.2

20.5

2.8

1.1

98.3

1.7

92.0

Bathurst

51.0

13.5

15.1

7.6

1.7

11.2

98.0

2.0

95.3

Baulkham Hills

32.1

47.9

4.4

6.9

8.6

97.6

2.4

94.7

Bega

31.5

45.7

13.0

4.4

5.4

98.3

1.7

93.4

Blacktown

54.7

19.9

9.5

7.7

8.2

96.5

3.5

93.9

Bligh

31.9

21.4

46.7

97.7

2.3

86.0

Blue Mountains

44.9

27.9

6.8

7.2

13.3

98.3

1.7

93.8

Burrinjuck

36.8

16.6

29.2

11.4

1.7

4.3

98.3

1.7

94.2

Cabramatta

49.3

8.2

5.1

1.3

36.1

95.9

4.1

92.2

Camden

37.4

43.7

9.0

9.9

97.5

2.5

94.3

Campbelltown

54.8

21.4

9.3

4.2

10.4

97.2

2.8

93.5

Canterbury

56.5

16.9

2.8

2.9

20.8

95.7

4.3

92.2

Cessnock

54.6

14.9

16.1

14.4

98.1

1.9

94.8

Charlestown

54.7

22.3

10.2

12.8

97.9

2.1

95.3

Clarence

36.9

17.8

25.4

10.8

1.3

7.8

98.5

1.5

94.4

Coffs Harbour

30.6

46.1

11.3

6.0

6.0

98.3

1.7

93.3

Coogee

49.4

32.7

2.4

5.7

9.9

98.1

1.9

89.7

Cronulla

34.9

44.9

7.6

2.8

9.7

97.8

2.2

93.0

Davidson

21.1

57.6

3.8

6.0

11.5

98.0

2.0

92.9

Drummoyne

46.6

32.6

4.1

4.4

12.3

96.9

3.1

93.7

Dubbo

20.3

31.8

18.1

1.5

28.3

98.1

1.9

94.5

East Hills

49.2

19.4

10.7

2.5

18.2

96.6

3.4

94.5

Epping

29.5

44.1

3.1

6.5

16.8

98.4

1.6

92.6

Fairfield

60.1

14.5

7.5

1.7

16.2

95.3

4.7

93.0

Georges River

47.1

36.9

5.3

10.7

97.7

2.3

93.7

Gosford

40.1

43.4

5.2

3.4

7.9

98.1

1.9

92.6

Granville

56.3

29.3

9.1

5.3

96.4

3.6

93.1

Hawkesbury

24.8

47.4

9.3

4.7

13.7

97.7

2.3

93.7

Heathcote

46.9

30.2

8.3

3.4

11.3

98.1

1.9

95.0

Heffron

63.4

19.4

4.4

4.0

8.9

96.3

3.7

91.3

Hornsby

33.8

41.1

4.1

4.9

16.2

97.7

2.3

92.9

Illawarra

50.8

16.2

8.9

5.0

19.1

97.2

2.8

94.7

Keira

45.4

11.2

6.6

36.7

97.9

2.1

94.1

Kiama

49.4

21.8

9.2

3.3

16.2

97.6

2.4

94.7

Kogarah

48.0

34.8

4.3

13.0

96.9

3.1

92.6

Ku-ring-gai

20.4

56.3

3.5

9.3

10.4

98.3

1.7

92.4

Lachlan

27.5

55.1

13.0

2.7

1.7

98.0

2.0

94.9

Lake Macquarie

54.8

22.4

12.2

10.6

97.9

2.1

94.4

Lakemba

63.2

17.0

3.8

3.1

12.9

96.4

3.6

92.4

Lane Cove

32.3

49.8

2.7

9.2

6.0

97.7

2.3

91.8

Lismore

27.7

13.5

39.2

3.3

16.3

98.2

1.8

93.8

Liverpool

67.0

17.0

8.9

7.2

96.0

4.0

92.3

Londonderry

49.0

25.0

11.1

3.3

11.6

96.4

3.6

92.7

Macquarie Fields

61.9

20.9

9.0

3.0

5.2

96.8

3.2

92.4

Maitland

42.9

41.0

8.0

1.8

6.4

98.6

1.4

96.0

Table2b: Legislative Assembly, District Summary

First Preference Votes, Per cent continued

District

ALP

LP

NP

PHON

AD

Others

Formal

Informal

Turnout

Manly

16.8

38.7

4.0

2.5

37.9

97.9

2.1

92.4

Maroubra

59.3

24.1

4.9

3.3

8.4

97.1

2.9

92.1

Marrickville

53.8

13.5

4.2

8.6

19.9

96.7

3.3

89.5

Menai

43.2

37.0

8.0

2.9

8.8

97.1

2.9

94.3

Miranda

42.9

40.6

7.2

3.7

5.6

98.0

2.0

94.4

Monaro

31.7

19.7

22.2

7.5

18.9

97.7

2.3

92.4

Mount Druitt

59.7

16.0

8.7

3.8

11.9

96.5

3.5

93.0

Mulgoa

53.1

24.2

8.9

3.2

10.6

96.3

3.7

93.6

Murray-Darling

44.2

36.3

16.4

2.1

1.0

98.1

1.9

90.7

Murrumbidgee

32.7

54.5

8.4

3.8

0.7

97.9

2.1

91.7

Myall Lakes

29.4

51.3

13.6

5.7

98.3

1.7

94.5

Newcastle

53.1

20.1

8.5

4.4

13.8

97.4

2.6

93.0

North Shore

27.9

53.9

2.2

8.0

7.9

98.3

1.7

88.8

Northern Tablelands

9.2

34.1

7.1

2.8

46.9

98.7

1.3

93.9

Orange

32.3

41.6

12.6

2.7

10.9

98.0

2.0

94.7

Oxley

24.4

36.3

18.8

2.8

17.7

98.1

1.9

93.7

Parramatta

53.6

30.0

4.9

3.2

8.2

97.3

2.7

91.0

Peats

49.9

31.3

6.8

3.9

8.1

97.5

2.5

94.2

Penrith

53.2

25.2

8.7

2.3

10.6

97.0

3.0

93.8

Pittwater

19.7

52.0

4.9

11.7

11.6

97.8

2.2

92.1

Port Jackson

53.9

18.4

1.8

7.5

18.5

96.6

3.4

89.4

Port Macquarie

27.0

56.0

12.1

4.9

98.4

1.6

94.6

Port Stephens

45.6

23.9

13.0

3.3

14.1

97.7

2.3

94.2

Riverstone

54.9

25.6

9.4

4.5

5.6

97.2

2.8

94.0

Rockdale

55.9

27.6

5.5

2.7

8.3

96.1

3.9

92.5

Ryde

44.1

33.6

2.5

3.8

16.1

97.3

2.7

93.4

Smithfield

62.3

22.0

5.8

2.4

7.5

96.5

3.5

93.5

South Coast

40.2

39.9

10.4

9.6

98.2

1.8

93.7

Southern Highlands

34.1

44.4

10.2

3.1

8.2

97.9

2.1

93.9

Strathfield

44.8

33.2

3.3

4.4

14.3

97.0

3.0

92.0

Swansea

51.2

23.5

13.2

4.0

8.1

97.8

2.2

95.1

Tamworth

12.4

11.6

6.7

69.4

98.7

1.3

94.4

The Entrance

47.3

27.6

9.5

6.9

2.8

5.8

97.8

2.2

94.1

The Hills

25.3

51.1

3.7

6.9

13.0

97.8

2.2

93.0

Tweed

44.2

40.7

2.4

12.8

98.0

2.0

91.4

Upper Hunter

31.7

49.2

12.8

6.3

98.1

1.9

94.9

Vaucluse

27.2

53.8

2.1

6.0

10.9

97.8

2.2

88.3

Wagga Wagga

26.3

25.4

22.9

8.0

2.7

14.8

98.3

1.7

93.4

Wakehurst

28.8

48.4

6.7

6.5

9.6

97.0

3.0

93.0

Wallsend

57.5

19.5

11.5

11.6

97.6

2.4

95.2

Wentworthville

52.5

27.3

6.4

2.8

10.9

96.8

3.2

93.6

Willoughby

28.1

50.8

2.2

7.6

11.2

97.7

2.3

91.5

Wollongong

62.7

15.6

5.5

16.2

96.6

3.4

93.8

Wyong

54.1

26.9

9.6

2.9

6.5

97.6

2.4

94.3

Total

42.2

24.8

8.9

7.5

3.3

13.2

97.5

2.5

93.1

Regions

Metropolitan

45.2

32.1

5.7

4.1

12.8

97.1

2.9

92.5

Provincial

50.5

22.8

1.9

9.0

2.8

13.0

97.7

2.3

94.4

Rural

30.1

11.2

32.1

10.2

2.1

14.4

98.2

1.8

93.5

Table 3: Legislative Assembly, District Summary

Two Candidate Preferred Votes

ALP

LP/NP

Other

District

No

%

No

%

No

%

Albury

17913

51.0

17226

49.0

Auburn

27158

74.3

9409

25.7

Ballina

13347

38.0

21790

62.0

Bankstown

28637

80.2

7062

19.8

Barwon

10865

32.8

22224

67.2

Bathurst

22433

67.8

10630

32.2

Baulkham Hills

15439

41.9

21440

58.1

Bega

15186

42.9

20251

57.1

Blacktown

24861

69.4

10987

30.6

Bligh

13215

40.2

19636

59.8

Blue Mountains

22623

61.8

13997

38.2

Burrinjuck

16343

48.8

17160

51.2

Cabramatta

21144

68.9

9555

31.1

Camden

17393

46.5

20006

53.5

Campbelltown

23153

69.9

9992

30.1

Canterbury

25871

75.2

8542

24.8

Cessnock

25813

72.6

9719

27.4

Charlestown

24802

69.3

10977

30.7

Clarence

16467

50.2

16324

49.8

Coffs Harbour

14129

41.7

19749

58.3

Coogee

22338

62.3

13539

37.7

Cronulla

16137

44.9

19785

55.1

Davidson

10502

28.9

25811

71.1

Drummoyne

22118

59.4

15117

40.6

Dubbo

15344

50.0

15358

50.0

East Hills

22862

68.3

10610

31.7

Epping

15434

42.9

20512

57.1

Fairfield

25891

78.3

7163

21.7

Georges River

21559

56.3

16763

43.7

Gosford

18262

47.7

19984

52.3

Granville

23720

64.6

13011

35.4

Hawkesbury

12466

36.7

21510

63.3

Heathcote

21864

60.4

14336

39.6

Heffron

25478

76.1

7998

23.9

Hornsby

17117

47.3

19065

52.7

Illawarra

22848

72.8

8554

27.2

Keira

19821

57.9

14390

42.1

Kiama

23048

67.7

10995

32.3

Kogarah

21381

57.5

15784

42.5

Ku-ring-gai

10826

30.0

25298

70.0

Lachlan

12680

33.7

24940

66.3

Lake Macquarie

25065

69.2

11134

30.8

Lakemba

26536

74.7

8998

25.3

Lane Cove

15846

42.6

21379

57.4

Lismore

13675

41.5

19293

58.5

Liverpool

28153

78.6

7666

21.4

Londonderry

21145

64.9

11436

35.1

Macquarie Fields

26705

73.5

9620

26.5

Maitland

20102

51.0

19347

49.0

Table 3: Legislative Assembly, District Summary

Two Candidate Preferred Votes

ALP

LP/NP

Other

District

No

%

No

%

No

%

Manly

16553

48.7

17408

51.3

Maroubra

25293

69.9

10867

30.1

Marrickville

23524

71.5

9394

28.5

Menai

20166

54.2

17044

45.8

Miranda

19002

52.3

17353

47.7

Monaro

15047

49.8

15175

50.2

Mount Druitt

26038

75.8

8322

24.2

Mulgoa

22993

67.6

11029

32.4

Murray-Darling

17765

54.2

15002

45.8

Murrumbidgee

14269

38.0

23261

62.0

Myall Lakes

13314

37.1

22531

62.9

Newcastle

24925

72.4

9510

27.6

North Shore

13624

37.7

22495

62.3

Northern Tablelands

14482

40.6

21162

59.4

Orange

14765

43.7

19041

56.3

Oxley

12687

42.0

17503

58.0

Parramatta

23472

64.5

12915

35.5

Peats

22397

61.3

14114

38.7

Penrith

23235

66.7

11592

33.3

Pittwater

10523

31.2

23201

68.8

Port Jackson

25904

75.1

8567

24.9

Port Macquarie

11990

33.4

23919

66.6

Port Stephens

20495

62.3

12421

37.7

Riverstone

25188

67.2

12316

32.8

Rockdale

23930

66.5

12042

33.5

Ryde

20813

56.6

15961

43.4

Smithfield

26525

72.8

9916

27.2

South Coast

18651

50.5

18276

49.5

Southern Highlands

15289

44.3

19209

55.7

Strathfield

21387

58.4

15225

41.6

Swansea

23507

66.6

11803

33.4

Tamworth

5597

14.8

32288

85.2

The Entrance

21292

59.7

14365

40.3

The Hills

13300

35.3

24352

64.7

Tweed

19402

52.6

17500

47.4

Upper Hunter

13880

39.5

21250

60.5

Vaucluse

12903

37.5

21486

62.5

Wagga Wagga

13500

42.5

18297

57.5

Wakehurst

13713

39.2

21225

60.8

Wallsend

26380

72.6

9957

27.4

Wentworthville

22631

65.4

11969

34.6

Willoughby

13965

38.9

21891

61.1

Wollongong

26996

78.7

7315

21.3

Wyong

24398

65.5

12873

34.5

Table 4: Electoral Pendulum

District

Margin

District

Margin

District

Margin

ALP Seats

LP/NP Seats

Ind Seats

Bankstown

80.2

Davidson

71.1

Tamworth

85.2

Wollongong

78.7

Ku-ring-gai

70.0

Bligh

59.8

Liverpool

78.6

Pittwater

68.8

Northern Tablelands

59.4

Fairfield

78.3

Barwon (NP)

67.2

Manly

51.3

Heffron

76.1

Port Macquarie (NP)

66.6

Dubbo

50.0

Mount Druitt

75.8

Lachlan (NP)

66.3

Canterbury

75.2

The Hills

64.7

Port Jackson

75.1

Hawkesbury

63.3

Lakemba

74.7

Myall Lakes (NP)

62.9

Auburn

74.3

Vaucluse

62.5

Macquarie Fields

73.5

North Shore

62.3

Smithfield

72.8

Ballina (NP)

62.0

Illawarra

72.8

Murrumbidgee (NP)

62.0

Cessnock

72.6

Willoughby

61.1

Wallsend

72.6

Wakehurst

60.8

Newcastle

72.4

Upper Hunter (NP)

60.5

Marrickville

71.5

Lismore (NP)

36.7

Maroubra

69.9

Coffs Harbour (NP)

58.3

Campbelltown

69.9

Baulkham Hills

58.1

Blacktown

69.4

Oxley (NP)

58.0

Charlestown

69.3

Wagga Wagga

57.5

Lake Macquarie

69.2

Lane Cove

57.4

Cabramatta

68.9

Bega

57.1

East Hills

68.3

Epping

57.1

Bathurst

67.8

Orange (NP)

56.3

Kiama

67.7

Southern Highlands

55.7

Mulgoa

67.6

Cronulla

55.1

Riverstone

67.2

Camden

53.5

Penrith

66.7

Hornsby

52.7

Swansea

66.6

Gosford

52.3

Rockdale

66.5

Burrinjuck (NP)

51.2

Wyong

65.5

Albury

51.0

Wentworthville

65.4

Monaro (NP)

50.2

Londonderry

64.9

Granville

64.6

Parramatta

64.5

Port Stephens

62.3

Coogee

62.3

Blue Mountains

61.8

Peats

61.3

Heathcote

60.4

The Entrance

59.7

Drummoyne

59.4

Strathfield

58.4

Keira

57.9

Kogarah

57.5

Ryde

56.6

Georges River

56.3

Murray-Darling

54.2

Menai

54.2

Tweed

52.6

Miranda

52.3

Maitland

51.0

South Coast

50.5

Clarence

50.2

Table 5 Legislative Assembly: District Summary

Albury

Enrolled

41 571

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Glachan I *

LP

16 374

43.0

Douglas C

IND

13 272

34.9

O'Donnell M

ALP

6 703

17.6

Smith M

PHON

1 731

4.5

Final count

Glachan I *

LP

17 913

51.0

Douglas C

IND

17 226

49.0

Exhausted

2 941

Formal

38 080

98.5

Informal

583

1.5

Turnout

38 663

93.0

Auburn

Enrolled

45 150

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Yakup F

UNI

3 021

7.4

Nagle P *

ALP

24 207

59.5

Bentley S

DSL

378

0.9

O'Connor K

PHON

2 536

6.2

Borluk B

LP

8 031

19.7

Johnson C

AAFI

620

1.5

McDermott C

AD

1 148

2.8

Ash G

GRN

749

1.8

Formal

40 690

96.3

Informal

1 581

3.7

Turnout

42 271

93.6

Ballina

Enrolled

43 298

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Robertson L

AD

1 675

4.3

MacGregor J

IND

524

1.3

Arnold S

TCW

390

1.0

Ward E

ES

523

1.3

Flower C

GRN

3 333

8.6

Page E *

NP

20 391

52.4

Gosper P

CDP

1 025

2.6

Dakin S

ALP

11 071

28.4

Formal

38 932

98.0

Informal

805

2.0

Turnout

39 737

91.8

Bankstown

Enrolled

44 744

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Ashe B

PHON

2 327

6.0

Barrett P

LP

5 755

14.8

Phillips R

SEP

239

0.6

Stewart T #

ALP

26 519

68.1

Walsh K

GRN

666

1.7

Botting K

AD

751

1.9

Bastin J

AAFI

315

0.8

Meguid E

UNI

1 551

4.0

Laurence K

CDP

838

2.2

Formal

38 961

95.5

Informal

1 840

4.5

Turnout

40 801

91.2

Barwon

Enrolled

43 149

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Dillon M

ALP

9 554

24.5

Cooke A

CEC

415

1.1

Johns B

PHON

7 988

20.5

Slack-Smith I *

NP

19 994

51.2

Graham K

AD

1 085

2.8

Formal

39 036

98.3

Informal

669

1.7

Turnout

39 705

92.0

Bathurst

Enrolled

42 729

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

McGinnes J

IND

2 348

5.9

Bray M

IND

348

0.9

Rowe W

PHON

3 020

7.6

Williams L

GRN

847

2.1

Gurney R

ORP

493

1.2

Grivas C

AD

660

1.7

Martin G #

ALP

20 375

51.0

Thompson R

NCP

100

0.3

Simpson D

CEC

149

0.4

Ashton M

AAFI

191

0.5

Wilson S

NP

6 018

15.1

Berry S

LP

5 394

13.5

Formal

39 943

98.0

Informal

799

2.0

Turnout

40 742

95.3

Baulkham Hills

Enrolled

44 571

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Ferrara M

AD

2 861

6.9

Merton W *

LP

19 737

47.9

Schultejohann L

PHON

1 825

4.4

Hay T

ALP

13 206

32.1

Wong M

UNI

1 336

3.2

Harris C

GRN

1 315

3.2

Marshall D

NCP

106

0.3

King M

AAFI

794

1.9

Final count

Merton W *

LP

21 440

58.1

Hay T

ALP

15 439

41.9

Exhausted

4 301

Formal

41 180

97.6

Informal

1 016

2.4

Turnout

42 196

94.7

Bega

Enrolled

43 473

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Smith R *

LP

18 253

45.7

Paris R

IND

685

1.7

Freihaut K

GRN

1 465

3.7

Boland J

ALP

12 562

31.5

Innes R

PHON

5 200

13.0

Redmond D

AD

1 751

4.4

Final count

Smith R *

LP

20 251

57.1

Boland J

ALP

15 186

42.9

Exhausted

4 479

Formal

39 916

98.3

Informal

678

1.7

Turnout

40 594

93.4

Blacktown

Enrolled

45 799

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

King D

AD

3 178

7.7

Sherwood E

AAFI

1 015

2.4

Bawden B

CDP

2 377

5.7

Holder R

LP

8 260

19.9

Gibson P #

ALP

22 714

54.7

Nixon B

PHON

3 953

9.5

Formal

41 497

96.5

Informal

1 497

3.5

Turnout

42 994

93.9

Bligh

Enrolled

45 282

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Marguin A

UNI

621

1.6

Holdaway E

GRN

2 245

5.9

Moore C *

IND

14 214

37.3

Upton C

TCW

128

0.3

Duncan M

IND

280

0.7

Smith V

ALP

12 153

31.9

Fussell P

LP

8 140

21.4

Hatfield B

NLP

93

0.2

Trubridge J

ERP

190

0.5

Final count

Moore C *

IND

19 636

59.8

Smith V

ALP

13 215

40.2

Exhausted

5 213

Formal

38 064

97.7

Informal

883

2.3

Turnout

38 947

86.0

Blue Mountains

Enrolled

44 625

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Bell C

ES

619

1.5

Anderson M

AAFI

378

0.9

Buckley W

PHON

2 777

6.8

Grigg S

CDP

1 954

4.7

Scott J

LP

11 464

27.9

Lear S

AD

2 944

7.2

Debus B *

ALP

18 474

44.9

Doust A

GRN

2 528

6.1

Final count

Scott J

LP

13 997

38.2

Debus B *

ALP

22 623

61.8

Exhausted

4 518

Formal

41 138

98.3

Informal

702

1.7

Turnout

41 840

93.8

Burrinjuck

Enrolled

42 787

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Tarlinton D

PHON

4 523

11.4

Cosgrove L

CEC

157

0.4

Fraser P

AD

657

1.7

Green J

GRN

1 041

2.6

Hodgkinson K

NP

11 574

29.2

McManus M

ALP

14 580

36.8

Newborne Z

CDP

496

1.3

Schultz G #

LP

6 589

16.6

Final count

Hodgkinson K

NP

17 160

51.2

McManus M

ALP

16 343

48.8

Exhausted

6 114

Formal

39 617

98.3

Informal

672

1.7

Tuurout

40 289

94.2

Cabramatta

Enrolled

43 295

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Cornish P

PHON

1 954

5.1

Watson G

LP

3 141

8.2

Hua M

AD

505

1.3

Lambert M

IND

5 706

14.9

Meagher R *

ALP

18 859

49.3

Su A

UNI

5 286

13.8

Kremec M

AAFI

241

0.6

Luke J

CDP

634

1.7

Grant L

GRN

461

1.2

Chapman K

IND

1 492

3.9

Final count

Lambert M

IND

9 555

31.1

Meagher R *

ALP

21 144

68.9

Exhausted

7 580

Formal

38 279

95.9

Informal

1 652

4.1

Turnout

39 931

92.2

Camden

Enrolled

46 153

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Kernohan L *

LP

18 566

43.7

Sanchez A

ALP

15 888

37.4

Powell A

GRN

1 762

4.1

Rosso O

PHON

3 809

9.0

Thompson J

NCP

172

0.4

Brazenall M

AAFI

646

1.5

Frawley G

IND

1 624

3.8

Final count

Kernohan L *

LP

20 006

53.5

Sanchez A

ALP

17 393

46.5

Exhausted

5 068

Formal

42 467

97.5

Informal

1 067

2.5

Turnout

43 534

94.3

Campbelltown

Enrolled

43 012

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Singh C

UNI

682

1.7

Kearnet V

GRN

1 383

3.5

Franks R

AAFI

968

2.5

Churchill J

NCP

235

0.6

Dawson C

PHON

3 630

9.3

Hawker P

LP

8 353

21.4

Freeman P

IND

798

2.0

Knight M *

ALP

21 414

54.8

Dudley D

AD

1 639

4.2

Formal

39 102

97.2

Informal

1 133

2.8

Turnout

40 235

93.5

Canterbury

Enrolled

44 741

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Moss K *

ALP

22 302

56.5

Tzavellas P

IND

691

1.8

Smith W

GRN

1 662

4.2

Nam J

IND

715

1.8

Robinson M

CDP

1 122

2.8

Shakir K

PHON

1 114

2.8

Vanderwel G

AAFI

184

0.5

Dalrymple G

AD

1 137

2.9

Koutsouras J

IND

1 973

5.0

Baini N

LP

6 686

16.9

Wan G

UNI

1 870

4.7

Formal

39 456

95.7

Informal

1 783

4.3

Turnout

41 239

92.2

Cessnock

Enrolled

43 239

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Coure M

LP

6 003

14.9

Hickey K #

ALP

21 966

54.6

Ryan J

GRN

2 025

5.0

Olsen I

IND

3 784

9.4

Burston G

PHON

6 462

16.1

Formal

40 240

98.1

Informal

760

1.9

Turnout

41 000

94.8

Charlestown

Enrolled

43 689

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Hunt J

IND

1 409

3.5

Face R *

ALP

22 300

54.7

Craig P

LP

9 078

22.3

Boswell J

CDP

1 190

2.9

Jacobi L

GRN

2 612

6.4

Sinclair M

PHON

4 157

10.2

Formal

40 746

97.9

Informal

878

2.1

Turnout

41 624

95.3

Clarence

Enrolled

42 363

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Rooke K

GRN

1 339

3.4

York A

AD

518

1.3

Mathew M

PHON

4 263

10.8

Day B

LP

7 004

17.8

Cansdell S

NP

10 019

25.4

Stanmore J

CDP

780

2.0

McMurtrie M

IND

101

0.3

Milner J

ES

151

0.4

Tiffen R

TCW

152

0.4

Behn D

IND

551

1.4

Woods H *

ALP

14 524

36.9

Final count

Cansdell S

NP

16 324

49.8

Woods H *

ALP

16 467

50.2

Exhausted

6 611

Formal

39 402

98.5

Informal

594

1.5

Turnout

39 996

94.4

Coffs Harbour

Enrolled

42 709

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Fraser A *

NP

18 043

46.1

Ansted F

AAFI

229

0.6

Sommer H

NCP

128

0.3

Erglis E

IND

271

0.7

Gardiner G

PHON

4 409

11.3

Backman C

ES

362

0.9

Williams A

ALP

11 970

30.6

Cairns C

GRN

1 369

3.5

Spencer M

AD

2 361

6.0

Final count

Fraser A *

NP

19 749

58.3

Williams A

ALP

14 129

41.7

Exhausted

5 264

Formal

39 142

98.3

Informal

692

1.7

Turnout

39 834

93.3

Coogee

Enrolled

43 492

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Page E *

ALP

18 901

49.4

Crow H

AD

2 180

5.7

Junee K

LP

12 498

32.7

Mullins D

PHON

910

2.4

Black L

AAFI

203

0.5

Matson M

GRN

3 578

9.3

Final count

Page E *

ALP

22 338

62.3

Junee K

LP

13 539

37.7

Exhausted

2 393

Formal

38 270

98.1

Informal

761

1.9

Turnout

39 031

89.7

Cronulla

Enrolled

44 412

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Poulos P

IND

404

1.0

Manasserian J

PHON

3 057

4.6

Day R

AD

1 148

2.8

Smith M

CDP

1 015

2.5

Docherty S

ALP

14 123

34.9

Power S

GRN

1 884

4.7

Kerr M *

LP

18 160

44.9

Feinbier W

AAFI

633

1.6

Final count

Docherty S

ALP

16 137

44.9

Kerr M *

LP

19 785

55.1

Exhausted

4 502

Formal

40 424

97.8

Informal

892

2.2

Turnout

41 316

93.0

Davidson

Enrolled

44 616

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Golden A

PHON

1 531

3.8

Humpherson A *

LP

23 394

57.6

Henderson S

AD

2 424

6.0

Ginges K

UNI

1 116

2.7

Lawson P

ALP

8 583

21.1

Weatherlake I

AAFI

459

1.1

Ratcliffe M

CDP

1 278

3.1

Tuor P

GRN

1 804

4.4

Formal

40 589

98.0

Informal

837

2.0

Turnout

41 426

92.9

Drummoyne

Enrolled

45 476

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Ferguson J

PHON

1 679

4.1

Murray J *

ALP

19 253

46.6

Doyle T

GRN

1 807

4.4

Mavin T

AAFI

286

0.7

Andrews C

AD

1 806

4.4

Paull J

IND

638

1.5

Lesslie S

IND

2 357

5.7

Phelps P

LP

13 475

32.6

Final count

Murray J *

ALP

22 118

59.4

Phelps P

LP

15 117

40.6

Exhausted

4 066

Formal

41 301

96.9

Informal

1 325

3.1

Turnout

42 626

93.7

Dubbo

Enrolled

42 678

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Neville J

PHON

7 166

18.1

Phillips C

GRN

513

1.3

Keough P

IND

1 711

4.3

Mutton R #

NP

12 597

31.8

Mundine W

ALP

8 016

20.3

McGrane T

IND

8 977

22.7

Dunkerley C

AD

593

1.5

Final count

Mutton R #

NP

15 344

50.0

McGrane T

IND

15 358

50.0

Exhausted

8 871

Formal

39 573

98.1

Informal

756

1.9

Turnout

40 329

94.5

East Hills

Enrolled

44 795

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Moffat J

AAFI

1 369

3.3

Carver D

IND

554

1.4

Charlton C

GRN

919

2.2

Bounds K

PHON

4 369

10.7

Parker M

IND

4 263

10.4

Ashton A #

ALP

20 146

49.2

Meikle J

AD

1 003

2.5

Korovin N

LP

7 926

19.4

Coppolaro M

ES

358

0.9

Final count

Ashton A #

ALP

22 862

68.3

Korovin N

LP

10 610

31.7

Exhausted

7 435

Formal

40 907

96.6

Informal

1 444

3.4

Turnout

42 351

94.5

Epping

Enrolled

44 490

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Parker J

GRN

2 319

5.7

Tink A #

LP

17 862

44.1

Jacobs R

AD

2 638

6.5

Yoo S

UNI

2 171

5.4

Bell P

AAFI

461

1.1

Gurney S

ALP

11 937

29.5

Ball H

PHON

1 274

3.1

Nannelli O

CDP

1 854

4.6

Final count

Tink A #

LP

20 512

57.1

Gurney S

ALP

15 434

42.9

Exhausted

4 570

Formal

40 516

98.4

Informal

660

1.6

Turnout

41 176

92.6

Fairfield

Enrolled

43 865

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Tripodi J *

ALP

23 362

60.1

Vinnicombe B

PHON

2 929

7.5

Ngo T

UNI

3 419

8.8

Rohan A

LP

5 629

14.5

Gutierrez R

GRN

839

2.2

Hua D

AD

662

1.7

Carey J

AAFI

512

1.3

Cogger L

NLP

133

0.3

Haroon G

CDP

1 188

3.1

Mackenzie S

NCP

87

0.2

Aiken B

IND

130

0.3

Formal

38 890

95.3

Informal

1 911

4.7

Turnout

40 801

93.0

Georges River

Enrolled

45 286

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

McFarlane B

AAFI

850

2.0

Ficarra M *

LP

15 285

36.9

Greene K

ALP

19 548

47.1

Tang A

IND

678

1.6

Celik P

UNI

847

2.0

Konnecle A

PHON

2 193

5.3

Kaye J

GRN

1 237

3.0

Bedwell D

IND

838

2.0

Final count

Ficarra M *

LP

16 763

43.7

Greene K

ALP

21 559

56.3

Exhausted

3 154

Formal

41 476

97.7

Informal

972

2.3

Turnout

42 448

93.7

Gosford

Enrolled

45 985

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Cohen B

ALP

16 720

40.1

Weckert J

GRN

1 159

2.8

McKenna T

IND

275

0.7

Hartcher C *

LP

18 136

43.4

Bailey G

CDP

1 104

2.6

Penfold A

AD

1 413

3.4

Gelling I

AAFI

288

0.7

Parker A

ES

475

1.1

Baker E

PHON

2 172

5.2

Final count

Cohen B

ALP

18 262

47.7

Hartcher C *

LP

19 984

52.3

Exhausted

3 496

Formal

41 742

98.1

Informal

824

1.9

Turnout

42 566

92.6

Granville

Enrolled

44 216

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

O'Connor S

PHON

3 599

9.1

Wadsworth D

AAFI

724

1.8

Issa T

LP

11 631

29.3

Gillbank M

GRN

1 379

3.5

Yeadon K *

ALP

22 330

56.3

Formal

39 663

96.4

Informal

1 489

3.6

Turnout

41 152

93.1

Hawkesbury

Enrolled

44 233

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Howden J

GRN

2 146

5.3

Bruggeman I

NCP

105

0.3

Rozzoli K *

LP

19 202

47.4

Lawson M

ALP

10 058

24.8

Rutter A

AD

1 914

4.7

Sheather L

IND

1 871

4.6

Dakin G

AAFI

499

1.2

Belling D

IND

935

2.3

Saxiones N

PHON

3 777

9.3

Final count

Rozzoli K *

LP

21 510

63.3

Lawson M

ALP

12 466

36.7

Exhausted

6 531

Formal

40 507

97.7

Informal

938

2.3

Turnout

41 445

93.7

Heathcote

Enrolled

44 122

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Lowder R

PHON

3 400

8.3

McLoughlin B

ORP

382

0.9

Lentern J

GRN

2 300

5.6

Stone L

LP

12 401

30.2

McManus I #

ALP

19 274

46.9

Hughes Z

AAFI

506

1.2

Holloway D

AD

1 379

3.4

Bowen J

CDP

1 351

3.3

Tsui W

UNI

127

0.3

Final count

Stone L

LP

14 336

39.6

McManus I #

ALP

21 864

60.4

Exhausted

4 920

Formal

41 120

98.1

Informal

784

1.9

Turnout

41 904

95.0

Heffron

Enrolled

42 157

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Dobson R

AAFI

952

2.6

Keyte J

GRN

1 992

5.4

Grusovin D *

ALP

23 492

63.4

Taylor D

PHON

1 615

4.4

Mendelssohn D

AD

1 476

4.0

Green J

DSL

338

0.9

Canessa J

LP

71 205

19.4

Formal

37 070

96.3

Informal

1 440

3.7

Turnout

38 510

91.3

Hornsby

Enrolled

45 519

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Jansson P

PHON

1 679

4.1

Douglas S

GRN

1 554

3.8

Swallow A

AD

2 012

4.9

Howe R

IND

141

0.3

Gallagher M

IND

1 882

4.6

Cardamatis S

ALP

13 966

33.8

Meany C

IND

1 925

4.7

Mudgee D

AAFI

363

0.9

Zhang X

UNI

817

2.0

O'Doherty S *

LP

16 976

41.1

Final count

Cardamatis S

ALP

17 117

47.3

O'Doherty S *

LP

19 065

52.7

Exhausted

5 133

Formal

41 315

97.7

Informal

982

2.3

Turnout

42 297

92.9

Illawarra

Enrolled

43 600

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Hughes B

CDP

2 759

6.9

Jordan K

LP

6 492

16.2

Bartholomew P

AD

2 017

5.0

Perrott M

DSL

336

0.8

Mason R

IND

1 850

4.6

Saliba M #

ALP

20 370

50.8

Anderson J

GRN

1 865

4.6

Green F

AAFI

656

1.6

Prsa I

PHON

3 576

8.9

Blayney S

NCP

208

0.5

Formal

40 129

97.2

Informal

1 160

2.8

Turnout

41 289

94.7

Keira

Enrolled

43 750

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Curtis J

PHON

2 678

6.6

Nederkoorn R

IND

1 385

3.4

Gozzard L

ES

855

2.1

O'Neill R

CDP

1 375

3.4

Akhurst A

LP

4 527

11.2

Campbell D #

ALP

18 293

45.4

Hamilton W

AAFI

313

0.8

Martin D

IND

10 855

26.9

Final count

Campbell D #

ALP

19 821

57.9

Martin D

IND

14 390

42.1

Exhausted

6 070

Formal

40 281

97.9

Informal

866

2.1

Turnout

41 147

94.1

Kiama

Enrolled

44 281

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Collier H

AD

1 363

3.3

Brown M #

ALP

20 236

49.4

Murray J

AAFI

472

1.2

Mifsud C

LP

8 936

21.8

Kadwell J

CDP

1 774

4.3

McLeod P

IND

1 234

3.0

Bradley J

GRN

3 157

7.7

Orr D

PHON

3 765

9.2

Final count

Brown M #

ALP

23 048

67.7

Mifsud C

LP

10 995

32.3

Exhausted

6 894

Formal

40 937

97.6

Informal

1 018

2.4

Turnout

41 955

94.7

Kogarah

Enrolled

45 576

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Chan P

IND

1 039

2.5

Witheridge S

LP

14 226

34.8

Kanak D

GRN

1 301

3.2

Ison M

CDP

838

2.0

Crompton L

IND

368

0.9

Uzunoski I

UNI

1 244

3.0

Peniazev A

NCP

40

0.1

Jones N

ORP

235

0.6

Burton C #

ALP

237

48.0

Whalen J

AAFI

237

0.6

Baird N

PHON

1 752

4.3

Final count

Witheridge S

LP

15 784

42.5

Burton C #

ALP

21 381

57.5

Exhausted

3 743

Formal

40 908

96.9

Informal

1 308

3.1

Turnout

42 216

92.6

Ku-ring-gai

Enrolled

44 417

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Ayres M

CDP

1 698

4.2

O'Farrell B *

LP

22 708

56.3

Webeck R

PHON

1 416

3.5

Ryder J

NLP

100

0.2

Halliday N

AD

3 769

9.3

Chehoff M

AAFI

379

0.9

Burke A

GRN

2 004

5.0

Butland J

ALP

8 241

20.4

Formal

40 315

98.3

Informal

710

1.7

Turnout

41 025

92.4

Lachlan

Enrolled

44 521

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Armstrong I *

NP

22 798

55.1

Reid W

PHON

5 383

13.0

Lord T

ALP

11 385

27.5

Mulligan P

AD

1 124

2.7

Durrant M

GRN

689

1.7

Formal

41 379

98.0

Informal

854

2.0

Turnout

42 233

94.9

Lake Macquarie

Enrolled

45 039

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Boulton B

AAFI

912

2.2

Payne D

LP

9 333

22.4

Gourlay R

CDP

1 370

3.3

Johnson R

PHON

5 073

12.2

Hunter J *

ALP

22 821

54.8

Blyth D

GRN

2 130

5.1

Formal

41 639

97.9

Informal

898

2.1

Turnout

42 537

94.4

Lakemba

Enrolled

43 470

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Moody T

AAFI

1 079

2.8

Iemma M #

ALP

24 457

63.2

Newman R

AD

1 181

3.1

Abou-Ghaida H

PHON

1 487

3.8

Hawatt M

LP

6 588

17.0

Coorey B

IND

3 896

10.1

Formal

38 688

96.4

Informal

1 463

3.6

Turnout

40 151

92.4

Lane Cove

Enrolled

44 607

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Harcourt-Horton D

AD

3 665

9.2

Rindermann B

AAFI

357

0.9

Orme S

GRN

2 060

5.2

May J

PHON

1 092

2.7

Powe B

ALP

12 911

32.3

Chikarovski K*

LP

19 896

49.8

Final count

Powe B

ALP

15 846

42.6

Chikarovski K *

LP

21 379

57.4

Exhausted

2 756

Formal

39 981

97.7

Informal

958

2.3

Turnout

40 939

91.8

Lismore

Enrolled

42 271

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Dhu R

CDP

1 426

3.7

Canales J

IND

311

0.8

George T #

NP

15 238

39.2

Corkill J

GRN

3 784

9.7

Thorpe R

ES

300

0.8

Howard J

LP

5 260

13.5

Bell K

ALP

10 779

27.7

Ward M

TCW

217

0.6

Wunsch B

DSL

322

0.8

Walsh M

AD

1 270

3.3

Final count

George T #

NP

19 293

58.5

Bell K

ALP

13 675

41.5

Exhausted

5 939

Formal

38 907

98.2

Informal

725

1.8

Turnout

39 632

93.8

Liverpool

Enrolled

45 093

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Barker D

LP

6 773

17.0

Lynch P *

ALP

26 754

67.0

Coleman J

AAFI

839

2.1

Costa R

UNI

1 662

4.2

Sanders E

NCP

151

0.4

Henshaw S

CEC

226

0.6

Smith R

PHON

3 546

8.9

Formal

39 951

96.0

Informal

1 682

4.0

Turnout

41 633

92.3

Londonderry

Enrolled

44 248

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Anderson J #

ALP

19 369

49.0

Burke S

PHON

4 406

11.1

Bailey D

IND

1 026

2.6

Conolly K

LP

9 877

25.0

Holmes A

NCP

185

0.5

Phillips J

CDP

1 407

3.6

Gelling L

AAFI

611

1.6

Kingsley R

GRN

1 341

3.4

Cassidy J

AD

1 305

3.3

Final count

Anderson J #

ALP

21 145

64.9

Conolly K

LP

11 436

35.1

Exhausted

6 946

Formal

39 527

96.4

Informal

1 494

3.6

Turnout

41 021

92.7

Macquarie Fields

Enrolled

45 578

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Knowles C #

ALP

25 223

61.9

Field J

AAFI

1 044

2.6

Allen M

IND

824

2.0

Lang E

AD

1 226

3.0

Thompson S

NCP

252

0.6

Horton S

PHON

3 660

9.0

Rowell J

LP

8 512

20.9

Formal

40 741

96.8

Informal

1 361

3.2

Turnout

42 102

92.4

Maitland

Enrolled

45 716

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Lawler A

CEC

359

0.8

Blackmore P *

LP

17 729

41.0

Harper P

PHON

3 452

8.0

Taylor B

ORP

518

1.2

Kerslake P

CDP

610

1.4

Price J

ALP

18 563

42.9

Lantry K

AD

766

1.8

Davis J

GRN

1 282

3.0

Final count

Blackmore P *

LP

19 347

49.0

Price J

ALP

20 102

51.0

Exhausted

3 830

Formal

43 279

98.6

Informal

619

1.4

Turnout

43 898

96.0

Manly

Enrolled

44 004

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Stitt P

ORP

347

0.9

de Monfort D

ALP

6 705

16.8

Wong C

UNI

337

0.8

Jones D

LP

15 424

38.7

Barr D

IND

12 005

30.2

Howells A

AD

1 004

2.5

Ecroyd P

AAFI

335

0.8

Lambert J

GRN

2 054

5.2

Ferguson C

PHON

1 595

4.0

Final count

Jones D

LP

16 553

48.7

Barr D

IND

17 408

51.3

Exhausted

5 845

Formal

39 806

97.9

Informal

869

2.1

Turnout

40 675

92.4

Maroubra

Enrolled

44 129

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Hassan N

UNI

991

2.5

Faulkner T

LP

9 523

24.1

Corben P

AD

1 292

3.3

McEwen J

PHON

1 926

4.9

Carr B *

ALP

23 393

59.3

Paton C

AAFI

312

0.8

Bastable J

GRN

2 009

5.1

Formal

39 446

97.1

Informal

1 187

2.9

Turnout

40 633

92.1

Marrickville

Enrolled

45 834

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Brown J

PHON

1 661

4.2

Kenyon P

AD

3 425

8.6

Overend A

ERP

279

0.7

Morris J

LP

5 351

13.5

Tadros M

IND

1 105

2.8

Roberts S

GRN

4 546

11.5

Bhattacharyya T

DSL

443

1.1

Refshauge A *

ALP

21 311

53.8

The G

UNI

904

2.3

Hallett C

CDP

607

1.5

Formal

39 632

96.7

Informal

1 370

3.3

Turnout

41 002

89.5

Menai

Enrolled

45 574

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

May B

IND

1 235

3.0

Mayne A

AD

1 216

2.9

Hutton D

PHON

3 360

8.0

Thomas B #

LP

15 434

37.0

Megarrity A

ALP

18 048

43.2

Wardle R

AAFI

711

1.7

McGoldrick J

GRN

1 743

4.2

Final count

Thomas B #

LP

17 044

45.8

Megarrity A

ALP

20 166

54.2

Exhausted

4 537

Formal

41 747

97.1

Informal

1 242

2.9

Turnout

42 989

94.3

Miranda

Enrolled

42 842

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Nettle K

GRN

1 612

4.1

Collier B

ALP

16 996

42.9

Hickman S

AD

1 460

3.7

Remy M

PHON

2 842

7.2

Eastwood K

AAFI

620

1.6

Phillips R *

LP

16 099

40.6

Final count

Collier B

ALP

19 002

52.3

Phillips R *

LP

17 353

47.7

Exhausted

3 274

Formal

39 629

98.0

Informal

805

2.0

Turnout

40 434

94.4

Monaro

Enrolled

42 227

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Webb P #

NP

8 477

22.4

Swift M

PHON

2 855

7.5

Keegel E

IND

145

0.4

Marjason I

LP

7 521

19.7

Moore C

GRN

1 809

4.7

Durst J

ALP

12 076

31.7

Fragiacomo F

IND

419

1.1

Pangallo F

IND

4 822

12.6

Final count

Webb P #

NP

15 175

50.2

Durst J

ALP

15 047

49.8

Exhausted

7 902

Formal

38 124

97.7

Informal

885

2.3

Turnout

39 009

92.4

Mount Druitt

Enrolled

44 532

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Reddy P

AD

1 517

3.8

Nolan B

GRN

1 140

2.9

Wyness J

CDP

1 812

4.5

Williams N

LP

3 458

8.7

Green A

UNI

6 399

16.0

Toal L

AAFI

1 133

2.8

Girvan R

ALP

651

1.6

Amery R *

23 820

59.7

Formal

39 930

96.5

Informal

1 467

3.5

Turnout

41 397

93.0

Mulgoa

Enrolled

44 706

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Hedges S

R2P

450

1.1

Mathews L

ORP

403

1.0

Horton V

GOSH

711

1.8

Beamer D #

ALP

21 413

53.1

Grant P

GRN

791

2.0

Lawson B

PF

188

0.5

Owen P

AD

1 282

3.2

Putra R

PHON

3 569

8.9

Mewett A

NBCA

1 196

3.0

Carey J

AAFI

407

1.0

Owens I

NCP

121

0.3

Bourne C

LP

9 772

24.2

Formal

40 303

96.3

Informal

1 555

3.7

Turnout

41 858

93.6

Murray-Darling

Enrolled

42 706

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Kersten M #

NP

13 790

36.3

Black P

ALP

16 781

44.2

Boyd A

CEC

246

0.6

White J

NCP

141

0.4

Burton D

AD

792

2.1

McKinnon D

PHON

6 238

16.4

Final count

Kersten M #

NP

15 002

45.8

Black P

ALP

17 765

54.2

Exhausted

5 221

Formal

37 988

98.1

Informal

727

1.9

Turnout

38 715

90.7

Murrumbidgee

Enrolled

45 059

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Ramsay S

AD

1 546

3.8

Mulloy L

PHON

3 378

8.4

Pittavino P

ALP

13 225

32.7

Stroobants L

CEC

271

0.7

Piccoli A #

NP

22 024

54.5

Formal

40 444

97.9

Informal

875

2.1

Turnout

41 319

91.7

Myall Lakes

Enrolled

43 712

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Tuffy M

ALP

11 922

29.4

Turner J *

NP

20 841

51.3

Deeney J

PHON

5 522

13.6

Gill L

GRN

1 717

4.2

Spragg K

AAFI

591

1.5

Formal

40 593

98.3

Informal

701

1.7

Turnout

41 294

94.5

Newcastle

Enrolled

45 039

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

McKenzie I

GRN

4 062

10.0

Gaudry B *

ALP

21 644

53.1

Criticos H

IND

899

2.2

Cook T

SEP

163

0.4

Brooks S

PHON

3 468

8.5

Bisgrove S

AD

1 802

4.4

Brookman C

UNI

101

0.2

Chaston D

CEC

77

0.2

Williams D

LP

8 208

20.1

Payne G

DSL

343

0.8

Formal

40 767

97.4

Informal

1 101

2.6

Turnout

41 868

93.0

North Shore

Enrolled

44 665

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Skinner J *

LP

20 994

53.9

Padgett B

AD

3 121

8.0

McDonald J

ALP

10 888

27.9

Kelly D

PHON

867

2.2

Bell D

GRN

2 743

7.0

Dedman L

AAFI

346

0.9

Formal

38 959

98.3

Informal

686

1.7

Turnout

39 645

88.8

Northern Tablelands

Enrolled

42 355

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Webeck J

PHON

2 770

7.1

Chappell R *

NP

13 381

34.1

Cooper M

AD

1 092

2.8

Schultz P

GRN

719

1.8

Keogh N

IND

360

0.9

Torbay R

IND

17 329

44.2

Lawrence M

ALP

3 598

9.2

Final count

Chappell R *

NP

14 482

40.6

Torbay R

IND

21 162

59.4

Exhausted

3 605

Formal

39 249

98.7

Informal

509

1.3

Turnout

39 758

93.9

Orange

Enrolled

42 982

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Cox D

IND

1 793

4.5

Turner R *

NP

16 566

41.6

Taylor G

ALP

12 878

32.3

McKenzie A

AD

1 059

2.7

Nixon T

PHON

5 036

12.6

McLennan M

CDP

1 305

3.3

Watts I

GRN

1 228

3.1

Final count

Turner R *

NP

19 041

56.3

Taylor G

ALP

14 765

43.7

Exhausted

6 059

Formal

39 865

98.0

Informal

824

2.0

Turnout

40 689

94.7

Oxley

Enrolled

42 546

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Williams B

AD

1 089

2.8

Cavanagh S

GRN

1 495

3.8

Argent J

ALP

9 548

24.4

Stoner A #

NP

14 187

36.3

Parkinson P

IND

2 011

5.1

Green B

IND

2 726

7.0

Henderson T

IND

686

1.8

Willey J

PHON

7 366

18.8

Final count

Argent J

ALP

12 687

42.0

Stoner A #

NP

17 503

58.0

Exhausted

8 918

Formal

39 108

98.1

Informal

770

1.9

Turnout

39 878

93.7

Parramatta

Enrolled

45 193

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Copping M

LP

12 023

30.0

Wright P

GRN

1 063

2.7

Cogger J

NLP

101

0.3

McCarthy R

UNI

1 426

3.6

Butler L

AAFI

360

0.9

McMahon M

NCP

84

0.2

Cooksey T

PHON

1 953

4.9

Harrison G *

ALP

21 466

53.6

Byrne P

AD

1 280

3.2

Moon K

DSL

257

0.6

Formal

40 013

97.3

Informal

1 094

2.7

Turnout

41 107

91.0

Peats

Enrolled

44 549

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Guo X

UNI

193

0.5

Andrews M *

ALP

20 451

49.9

King I

AAFI

461

1.1

Prest J

PHON

2 767

6.8

Spencer S

CDP

1 104

2.7

Lacey S

GRN

1 194

2.9

Wales D

LP

12 803

31.3

Purcival N

ES

372

0.9

Preece G

AD

1 598

3.9

Final count

Andrews M *

ALP

22 397

61.3

Wales D

LP

14 114

38.7

Exhausted

4 432

Formal

40 943

97.5

Informal

1 040

2.5

Turnout

41 983

94.2

Penrith

Enrolled

44 323

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Harris-Ball V

IND

309

0.8

Thompson J

NCP

108

0.3

Eykamp J

PHON

3 523

8.7

Edwards L

GRN

1 230

3.0

Grim-Reaper S

IND

238

0.6

Hooper N

IND

114

0.3

Broderick W

IND

129

0.3

Lo Po F *

ALP

21 467

53.2

Villa R

AD

933

2.3

Morris D

AAFI

366

0.9

Grigg B

CDP

1 425

3.5

Fowler R

LP

10 154

25.2

Rogers M

ES

340

0.9

Formal

40 336

97.0

Informal

1 243

3.0

Turnout

41 579

93.8

Pittwater

Enrolled

44 626

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Boydell P

ALP

7 938

19.7

Vlug P

NCP

135

0.3

Bristow R

CDP

1 088

2.7

Brogden J *

LP

20 918

52.0

Sonza a

ES

414

1.0

Dimond V

AD

4 719

11.7

Ockenden T

GRN

2 604

6.5

Whitmore P

AAFI

436

1.1

Cuthertson P

PHON

1 955

4.9

Formal

40 207

97.8

Informal

897

2.2

Turnout

41 104

92.1

Port Jackson

Enrolled

46 377

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Nori S *

ALP

21 582

53.9

Burvill J

NLP

81

0.2

Druery K

PF

119

0.3

Malliate J

NCP

67

0.2

Lennane J

IND

2 944

7.3

Ryde J

GRN

3 159

7.9

Doherty D

CPA

549

1.4

Vescio M

PHON

735

1.8

Furness P

AD

2 993

7.5

Loschiavo R

GOSH

174

0.4

Huxley K

LP

7 359

18.4

Carman M

DSL

310

0.8

Formal

40 072

96.6

Informal

1 390

3.4

Turnout

41 462

89.4

Port Macquarie

Enrolled

43 060

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Dachs N

AAFI

606

1.5

Riordan M

ALP

10 815

27.0

Oakeshott R

NP

22 471

56.0

Muldoon G

CEC

151

0.4

Andersons L

GRN

1 219

3.0

Sara K

PHON

4 832

12.1

Formal

40 094

98.4

Informal

636

1.6

Turnout

40 730

94.6

Port Stephens

Enrolled

43 840

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Stevenson G

GRN

2 237

5.5

King T

CEC

449

1.1

McCann M

IND

1 073

2.7

Robinson G

NP

9 650

23.9

Dover S

CDP

1 930

4.8

Boyd F

AD

1 345

3.3

Bartlett J #

ALP

18 415

45.6

Conway M

PHON

5 247

13.0

Final count

Robinson G

NP

12 421

37.7

Bartlett J #

ALP

20 495

62.3

Exhausted

7 430

Formal

40 346

97.7

Informal

932

2.3

Turnout

41 278

94.2

Riverstone

Enrolled

46 132

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Hawkins C

GRN

1 522

3.6

King J

AAFI

838

2.0

Aquilina J *

ALP

23 148

54.9

McIntyre J

LP

10 779

25.6

Peacock T

AD

1 908

4.5

Pettitt T

PHON

3 964

9.4

Formal

42 159

97.2

Informal

1 216

2.8

Turnout

43 375

94.0

Rockdale

Enrolled

44 815

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Johnson P

IND

818

2.1

Jones J

IND

651

1.6

Chung C

AD

1 087

2.7

Taylor N

GRN

1 191

3.0

Thompson G *

ALP

22 258

55.9

Kaloudis P

LP

11 003

27.6

Ryan W

IND

172

0.4

Gelling I

AAFI

339

0.9

Cardillo P

NCP

128

0.3

Citton M

PHON

2 185

5.5

Formal

39 832

96.1

Informal

1 629

3.9

Turnout

41 461

92.5

Ryde

Enrolled

45 383

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Petch I

IP

3 494

8.5

Mathews J

ORP

232

0.6

Plumb N

AD

1 551

3.8

Shaw R

GRN

1 098

2.7

Salmon R

PF

80

0.2

Paton F

AAFI

276

0.7

Watkins J

ALP

18 169

44.1

Photios M *

LP

13 853

33.6

Knight I

IND

184

0.4

Gao N

UNI

1 260

3.1

King G

PHON

1 023

2.5

Final count

Watkins J

ALP

20 813

56.6

Photios M *

LP

15 961

43.4

Exhausted

4 446

Formal

41 220

97.3

Informal

1 151

2.7

Turnout

42 371

93.4

Smithfield

Enrolled

44 952

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Robertson B

LP

8 924

22.0

Vega V

GRN

1 265

3.1

Dutton W

PHON

2 352

5.8

Scully C *

ALP

25 276

62.3

Haroon L

CDP

1 341

3.3

Nelson E

AAFI

430

1.1

Poularas M

AD

956

2.4

Formal

40 544

96.5

Informal

1 483

3.5

Turnout

42 027

93.5

South Coast

Enrolled

44 769

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Smith W

ALP

16 543

40.2

Ellis E *

LP

16 425

39.9

Bowen C

AAFI

479

1.2

Bange J

GRN

2 086

5.1

Ryan S

CDP

1 378

3.3

Warn M

PHON

4 274

10.4

Final count

Smith W

ALP

18 651

50.5

Ellis E *

LP

18 276

49.5

Exhausted

4 258

Formal

41 185

98.2

Informal

757

1.8

Turnout

41 942

93.7

Southern Highlands

Enrolled

43 149

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Styles L

IND

983

2.5

Taylor L

NCP

147

0.4

Butler G

AD

1 225

3.1

Seaton P *

LP

17 614

44.4

Lavis P

AAFI

464

1.2

Clarke T

PHON

4 055

10.2

Brown N

ALP

13 527

34.1

Clark J

GRN

1 678

4.2

Final count

Seaton P *

LP

19 209

55.7

Brown N

ALP

15 289

44.3

Exhausted

5 195

Formal

39 693

97.9

Informal

833

2.1

Turnout

40 526

93.9

Strathfield

Enrolled

46 002

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Angel C

ORP

460

1.1

Peterson J

CDP

1 117

2.7

Cheung K

PV

248

0.6

Wu O

UNI

2 273

5.5

MacCarthy B *

LP

13 623

33.2

Zeitoun A

PHON

1 365

3.3

Soulos M

GRN

1 374

3.3

Divola J

AAFI

204

0.5

Roper S

DSL

207

0.5

Garrett A

AD

1 800

4.4

Whelan P

ALP

18 386

44.8

Final count

MacCarthy B *

LP

15 225

41.6

Whelan P

ALP

21 387

58.4

Exhausted

4 445

Formal

41 057

97.0

Informal

1 277

3.0

Turnout

42 334

92.0

Swansea

Enrolled

44 451

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Gorgievski D

GRN

2 038

4.9

Wiltshire J

LP

9 712

23.5

Walls M

AD

1 671

4.4

Gardnir R

PHON

5 469

13.2

Wood G

CDP

1 300

3.1

Orkopoulos M #

ALP

21 152

51.2

Formal

41 342

97.8

Informal

922

2.2

Turnout

42 264

95.1

Tamworth

Enrolled

43 606

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Windsor T *

IND

28 182

69.4

Mandel-Hayes D

PHON

2 718

6.7

Barry S

ALP

5 029

12.4

Cox J

NP

4 701

11.6

Formal

40 630

98.7

Informal

520

1.3

Turnout

41 150

94.4

The Entrance

Enrolled

44 841

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Cantwell J

PHON

2 861

6.9

McBride G *

ALP

19 526

47.3

Alterator R

GRN

936

2.3

Oates G

AAFI

323

0.8

Browning S

AD

1 167

2.8

Graham B

NP

3 909

9.5

Walker P

LP

11 404

27.6

Coulter G

ORP

277

0.7

Russell K

CDP

874

2.1

Final count

McBride G *

ALP

21 292

59.7

Walker P

LP

14 365

40.3

Exhausted

5 620

Formal

41 277

97.8

Informal

936

2.2

Turnout

42 213

94.1

The Hills

Enrolled

47 272

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Houssos G

ALP

10 876

25.3

Fitzpatrick A

PHON

1 606

3.7

Chung C

GRN

1 178

2.7

McAuliffe H

AD

2 963

6.9

Baker S

AAFI

423

1.0

Gregory K

CDP

2 262

5.3

Richardson M *

LP

21 954

51.1

Chan S

UNI

1 734

4.0

Formal

42 996

97.8

Informal

974

2.2

Turnout

43 970

93.0

Tweed

Enrolled

44 768

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Penhaligon J

IND

2 584

6.4

Henderson T

AD

945

2.4

Tabart T

GRN

2 013

5.0

Beck D #

NP

16 315

40.7

Hollis T

ES

535

1.3

Newell N

ALP

17 713

44.2

Final count

Beck D #

NP

17 500

47.4

Newell N

ALP

19 402

52.6

Exhausted

3 203

Formal

40 105

98.0

Informal

834

2.0

Turnout

40 939

91.4

Upper Hunter

Enrolled

42 206

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Easey G

CEC

670

1.7

Connor C

ALP

12 450

31.7

Lawn B

PHON

5 030

12.8

Paxton D

CDP

626

1.6

Strachan N

GRN

1 195

3.0

Souris G *

NP

19 307

49.2

Final count

Connor C

ALP

13 880

39.5

Souris G *

NP

21 250

60.5

Exhausted

4 148

Formal

39 278

98.1

Informal

756

1.9

Turnout

40 034

94.9

Vaucluse

Enrolled

43 642

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Weiner H

GRN

3 797

10.1

Patch D

ALP

10 244

27.2

Collings M

AD

2 269

6.0

Ford W

PHON

791

2.1

Zylber G

ERP

305

0.8

Debnam P *

LP

20 271

53.8

Formal

37 677

97.8

Informal

860

2.2

Turnout

38 537

88.3

Wagga Wagga

Enrolled

43 098

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Booth J

NP

9 052

22.9

Jerrick G

PHON

3 147

8.0

McPherson C

ALP

10 391

26.3

Campbell L

IND

1 650

4.2

Graham R

AD

1 071

2.7

Dale P

IND

4 214

10.7

Maguire D #

LP

10 032

25.4

Final count

McPherson C

ALP

13 500

42.5

Maguire D #

LP

18 297

57.5

Exhausted

7 760

Formal

39 557

98.3

Informal

695

1.7

Turnout

40 252

93.4

Wakehurst

Enrolled

44 123

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

First count

Hampel A

AAFI

1 172

2.9

Hatten B

GRN

2 644

6.6

Nelson I

PHON

2 684

6.7

Hazzard B *

LP

19 278

48.4

Stokes C

ALP

11 455

28.8

Russell G

AD

2 583

6.5

Final count

Hazzard B *

LP

21 225

60.8

Stokes C

ALP

13 713

39.2

Exhausted

4 878

Formal

39 816

97.0

Informal

1 219

3.0

Turnout

41 035

93.0

Wallsend

Enrolled

45 751

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Murray D

CDP

1 752

4.1

Thompson C

PHON

4 878

11.5

Schroeder M

CEC

246

0.6

Moroney R

GRN

2 920

6.9

Piddington Y

LP

8 265

19.5

Mills J *

ALP

24 424

57.5

Formal

42 485

97.6

Informal

1 061

2.4

Turnout

43 546

95.2

Wentworthville

Enrolled

44 675

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Allan P #

ALP

21 250

52.5

Jonsson D

CDP

1 819

4.5

Chin S

UNI

972

2.4

Merton R

LP

11 071

27.3

Filipczyk R

GRN

1 093

2.7

Hutchinson J

PHON

2 609

6.4

O'Leary K

AAFI

534

1.3

Rutledge G

AD

1 132

2.8

Formal

40 480

96.8

Informal

1 341

3.2

Turnout

41 821

93.6

Willoughby

Enrolled

44 775

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Brasch L

ALP

11 262

28.1

McGuire B

AD

3 048

7.6

Collins P *

LP

20 327

50.8

Markuse H

PHON

895

2.2

Aukim J

ES

277

0.7

McCallum D

AAFI

321

0.8

Brown B

GRN

2 090

5.2

Wong C

UNI

1 816

4.5

Formal

40 036

97.7

Informal

954

2.3

Turnout

40 990

91.5

Wollongong

Enrolled

43 467

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Yue K

UNI

652

1.7

Russell K

AD

2 185

5.5

James J

AAFI

1 274

3.2

Luvera A

DSL

470

1.2

Markham C #

ALP

24 713

62.7

Dickenson G

GRN

2 557

6.5

Latz P

CDP

1 419

3.6

McInerney W

LP

6 153

15.6

Formal

39 423

96.5

Informal

1 368

3.5

Turnout

40 791

93.8

Wyong

Enrolled

45 414

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Nelson M

AAFI

730

1.7

Hastie C

ES

810

1.9

Holten R

PHON

4 004

9.6

Hopkins B

CDP

1 191

2.9

Mott D

AD

1 199

2.9

Lamb D

LP

11 233

26.9

Crittenden P *

ALP

22 606

54.1

Formal

41 773

97.6

Informal

1 038

2.4

Turnout

42 811

94.3

Table 6: Legislative Council, State Summary

Candidates

Seats Won

First Preference Votes

Swing %

Number

Per cent

Australian Labor Party

15

8

1 325 819

37.27

+2.02

Liberal/National Party

15

6

974 352

27.39

-11.10

Pauline Hanson's One Nation

5

1

225 668

6.34

+6.34

Australian Democrats

9

1

142 768

4.01

+0.80

Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group)

5

1

112 699

3.17

+0.16

The Greens

9

1

103 463

2.91

-0.84

John Tingle - The Shooters Party

11

59 295

1.67

-1.17

Progressive Labour Party

2

56 037

1.58

+1.58

Marijuana Smokers Rights Party

2

43 991

1.24

+1.24

Reform the Legal System

2

1

35 712

1.00

+1.00

Unity

5

1

34 785

0.98

+0.98

Country Summit Alliance

9

31 771

0.89

+0.89

Registered Clubs Party

6

27 564

0.77

+0.77

Gun Owners and Sporting Hunters Rights

2

25 106

0.71

+0.71

Country Party

2

19 819

0.56

-0.04

What's Doing? Party

2

18 318

0.51

+0.51

A Better Future for Our Children

2

15 800

0.44

-0.84

Franca Arena Child Safety Alliance

3

13 788

0.39

+0.39

Three Day Weekend Party

2

12 003

0.34

+0.34

Australian Family Alliance

5

11 824

0.33

+0.33

Young Australians Caring for Our Future

2

11 090

0.31

+0.31

Australians Against Further Immigration

2

10 881

0.31

-1.34

Gay and Lesbian Party

2

10 446

0.29

+0.29

Australians Against the Promotion of Homosexuality

2

9 118

0.26

+0.26

The Australian Small Business Party

2

8 998

0.25

+0.25

The Animal Liberation Party

2

7 884

0.22

+0.22

Democratic Socialists

2

7 638

0.21

-0.04

Speranza: Hope for Better Health NSW

3

7 637

0.21

+0.21

The Four Wheel Drive Party

2

7 547

0.21

+0.21

Outdoor Recreation Party

3

1

7 264

0.20

+0.20

Riders' and Motorists Party Inc.

2

7 027

0.20

-0.29

Kevin Ryan - Drug Reform

2

6 844

0.19

+0.19

The Seniors Party

2

6 565

0.18

-0.65

Jobs for Everyone - Futures For All

2

6 522

0.18

+0.18

Marine Environment Conservation Party

2

6 185

0.17

+0.17

The Wilderness Party

2

6 097

0.17

+0.17

Stop Banks from Exploiting Australians Group

2

5 931

0.17

+0.17

Australian Independent Coalition for Political Integrity

2

5 650

0.16

+0.16

Fair Tax Party

4

5 209

0.15

+0.15

Help Disabled People

2

5 056

0.14

0.15

No GST/Mick Gallagher for Australia

2

5 008

0.14

+0.14

NSW Ratepayers Party

2

4 983

0.14

+0.14

Womens Party/Save the Forests

4

4 740

0.13

+0.13

Australia First

2

4 709

0.13

+0.01

Make Billionaires Pay More Tax!

2

4 672

0.13

+0.13

Table 6: Legislative Council, State Summary continued

Candidates

Seats Won

First Preference Votes

Swing %

Number

Per cent

Euthanasia Referendum Party

2

4 553

0.13

+0.13

Care For Us Party

2

4 472

0.13

+0.13

(Godfrey Bigot) People Before Party Politics

2

4 463

0.13

+0.13

Hospitals, Education, Law, Privacy

2

4 424

0.12

+0.12

Earthsave

2

4 070

0.11

+0.11

People Against Paedophiles

2

3 934

0.11

+0.11

Independent Community Network

4

3 890

0.11

+0.11

Abolish State Governments!

3

3 853

0.11

-0.12

A Fair Go for Families

2

3 650

0.10

+0.10

Communist Party of Australia

2

3 391

0.10

+0.10

Voice of the People Party

4

3 260

0.09

+0.09

Citizens Electoral Councils of Australia

2

3 227

0.09

+0.01

Natural Law Party

2

3 212

0.09

-0.08

Give Criminals Longer Sentences

2

3 145

0.09

+0.09

Responsible Drug Reform for Australia

2

3 138

0.09

+0.09

Republic 2001/People First

15

3 076

0.09

+0.09

Outside Newcastle Sydney Wollongong Party

2

2 927

0.08

+0.08

Responsible Gamblers Party

2

2 906

0.08

+0.08

No Nuclear Waste Dumps Party

2

2 552

0.07

+0.07

Motor Vehicle Consumer Protection Party

2

2 209

0.06

+0.06

No Privatisation People's Party

2

2 084

0.06

+0.06

No Badgerys Creek Airport Party

2

2 002

0.06

+0.06

Esposito Group

2

1 984

0.06

+0.06

Anti-Corruption Party (Insurers, Lawyers, Politicians)

2

1 865

0.05

+0.05

Non-Custodial Parents Party

2

1 825

0.05

+0.05

Elect the President

2

1 720

0.05

+0.05

Australians for a Better Community

2

1 679

0.05

+0.05

Reclaim Australia

2

1 510

0.04

+0.04

Our Common Future Party

2

1 465

0.04

+0.04

Kanan Group

2

1 235

0.03

+0.03

Hotel Patrons Party

2

1 188

0.03

+0.03

Reform Parliamentary Superannuation Party

2

1 108

0.03

+0.03

Community First Party

2

1 027

0.03

+0.03

The Timbarra Clean Water Party

2

871

0.02

+0.02

Tenants Have Rights

2

804

0.02

+0.02

Miller, Bob

1

238

0.01

+0.01

Ivor,F

1

205

0.01

+0.01

Lang, Chris

1

181

0.01

+0.01

Dixen, Mark

1

102

0.00

+0.00

Wright, Michael

1

44

0.00

+0.00

Watson, Eddy

1

31

0.00

+0.00

Formal Votes

3 557 762

92.83

-1.06

Informal Votes

274 594

7.17

+1.06

Turnout/Total Votes

263

21

3 832 356

93.11

-0.69

Enrolled

4 116 059

Table 7: Legislative Council, Composition by Year of Election

Party

1995

1999

Total

Australian Labor Party

8

8

16

Liberal Party

5

4

9

National Party

2

2

4

The Greens

1

1

2

Christian Democratic Party

1

1

2

Australian Democrats

1

1

Shooters Party

1

1

A Better Future For Our Children

1

1

Pauline Hanson's One Nation

1

1

Outdoor Recreation Party

1

1

Unity

1

1

Reform the Legal System

1

1

Independents (a)

2

2

Total

21

21

42

(a) Includes R Jones elected as an Australian Democrat in 1995 and H Sham-Ho elected as a Liberal Party member in 1995.

Table 8: Legislative Assembly By-elections 1995-1999

Clarence (25.5.96)

Enrolled

39 919

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Swing

First count

Woods H

ALP

18 030

51.3

+17.1

Wrightson P

AD

1 415

4.0

+1.0

Sharman C

GRN

1 049

3.0

-0.6

Knight G #

NP

14 662

41.7

-11.3

Final count

Woods H

ALP

19 280

55.7

+14.0

Knight G #

NP

15 352

44.3

-14.0

Exhausted

255

Formal

35 156

98.7

+1.7

Informal

451

1.3

-1.7

Turnout

35 607

89.2

Orange (25.5.96)

Enrolled

39 500

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Swing

First count

Turner R #

NP

16 884

48.7

-11.3

Cianfrano R

IND

2 299

6.6

+3.7

Sullivan T

ALP

15 489

44.7

+14.8

Final count

Turner R #

NP

18 011

52.6

-13.8

Sullivan T

ALP

16 232

47.4

+13.8

Exhausted

429

Formal

34 672

98.6

+2.6

Informal

495

1.4

-2.6

Turnout

35 167

89.3

Pittwater (25.5.96)

Enrolled

40 585

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Swing

First count

Dimond V

AD

4 694

14.1

+9.8

Smith G

IND

1 591

4.8

+4.8

Brogden J #

LP

16 772

50.4

-10.5

Bristow R

CTA

960

2.9

-0.2

Cairns C

GRN

2 344

7.0

-4.1

Sargent G

ALP

4 429

13.3

-5.7

Woodger J

AAFI

2 502

7.5

+7.5

Final count

Dimond V

AD

10 409

35.0

Brodgen J #

LP

19 346

65.0

Exhausted

3 537

Formal

33 292

98.4

+2.3

Informal

548

1.6

-2.3

Turnout

33 840

83.4

Southern Highlands (25.5.96)

Enrolled

40 345

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Swing

First count

Butler G

AD

2 155

6.1

+1.6

Chappell C

CTA

763

2.2

-0.5

Duncan M

IND

1 493

4.2

+4.2

Seaton P #

LP

10 565

29.9

-24.7

Yeo P

ALP

8 862

25.1

-7.4

Hodgkinson K

NP

11 530

32.6

+32.6

Final count

Seaton P #

LP

16 933

52.4

Hodgkinson K

NP

15 400

47.6

Exhausted

3 035

Formal

35 368

98.0

+1.8

Informal

712

2.0

-1.8

Turnout

36 080

89.4

Strathfield (25.5.96)

Enrolled

38 157

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Swing

First count

Peterson J

CTA

1 460

4.7

+4.7

Meagher D

GRN

1 323

4.2

+4.2

Timbrell J

ALP

10 484

33.7

-6.7

Hill R

IND

298

1.0

+1.0

MacCarthy B #

LP

15 772

50.7

-2.7

Newman A

AD

1 793

5.8

+0.8

Final count

Timbrell J

ALP

12 522

41.8

-2.2

MacCarthy B #

LP

17 462

58.2

+2.2

Exhausted

1 146

Formal

31 130

97.7

+3.1

Informal

744

2.3

-3.1

Turnout

31 874

83.5

Port Macquarie (30.11.96)

Enrolled

42 422

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Swing

First count

Barrett J

IND

11 920

32.2

+32.2

Smith C

ASP

2 528

6.8

+6.8

Kooy B

IND

412

1.1

+1.1

Rogers G

IND

74

0.2

+0.2

Farrugia P

IND

603

1.6

+1.6

Russell S

GRN

1 919

5.2

0.0

Hutchinson J

AAFI

2 273

6.1

+6.1

Oakeshott R #

NP

17 293

46.7

-5.9

Final count

Barrett J

IND

15 268

45.1

Oakeshott R #

NP

18 559

54.9

Exhausted

3 195

Formal

37 022

98.6

+2.2

Informal

536

1.4

-2.2

Turnout

37 558

88.5

Table 9: Legislative Assembly Elections 1950-1999

Election

ALP

LP

NP

AD

DLP

GRN

OTH

Total

First Preference Votes

1950

46.7

37.5

7.6

8.2

100.0

1953

55.0

27.9

11.6

5.4

100.0

1956

47.9

35.1

10.2

6.9

100.0

1959

49.1

35.4

8.4

1.3

5.8

100.0

1962

48.6

34.9

9.4

1.5

5.7

100.0

1965

43.3

39.6

10.2

2.1

4.8

100.0

1968

43.1

38.5

10.6

2.3

5.5

100.0

1971

45.0

35.7

8.6

3.2

7.5

100.0

1973

42.9

33.8

10.5

6.0

6.8

100.0

1976

49.8

36.3

10.0

3.9

100.0

1978

57.8

27.0

9.9

2.6

2.7

100.0

1981

55.7

27.6

11.2

2.4

3.0

100.0

1984

48.8

32.2

10.8

2.8

5.4

100.0

1988

38.5

35.8

13.7

1.8

10.2

100.0

1991

39.1

34.2

10.5

5.4

0.5

10.4

100.0

1995

41.3

32.8

11.1

2.8

2.6

9.4

100.0

1999

42.2

24.8

8.9

3.3

3.9

16.9

100.0

Seats Won

1950

46

29

17

2

94

1953

57

22

14

1

94

1956

50

27

15

2

94

1959

49

28

16

1

94

1962

54

25

14

1

94

1965

45

31

16

2

94

1968

39

36

17

2

94

1971

45

32

17

2

96

1973

44

34

18

1

2

99

1976

50

30

18

1

99

1978

63

18

17

1

99

1981

69

14

14

2

99

1984

58

22

15

4

99

1988

43

39

20

7

109

1991

46

32

17

4

99

1995

50

29

17

3

99

1999

55

20

13

5

93


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