House of Representatives Committees

| House of Representatives Standing Committee on Climate Change, Environment and the Arts

Footnotes

Chapter 1 Introduction

[1]       The inquiry was referred to the Committee jointly by the Minister for Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, and the Minister for Climate Change and Energy Efficiency.

[2]       House of Representatives Standing Committee on Climate Change, Environment and the Arts, Case studies on biodiversity conservation: volume 1, May 2012, p. 1; House of Representatives, Debates, no. 8, 28 May 2012, pp. 5631‑34.

Chapter 2 Museums and bird habitats in Victoria

[1]       Museums Board of Victoria, Annual report 2010–11, Museum Victoria, 2011, p. 2; Discussions with museum staff during site inspections, 3 May 2012.

[2]       Birds Australia, Submission 40, p. 1.

[3]       See Museum Victoria, ‘Terrestrial environments’, <http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections-research/our-research/sciences/terrestrial-environments/> viewed 23 May 2012; Museum Victoria, ‘Marine sciences’, <http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections-research/our-research/sciences/marine-biology/> viewed 23 May 2012.

[4]       Museum Victoria, ‘Identifications’, <http://museumvictoria.com.au/discoverycentre/ask-us-a-question/identifications/> viewed 23 May 2012.

[5]       Collaboration is formally carried out under the banner of Museum Victoria, which is the organisation responsible for operating Melbourne Museum and two other museums.

[6]       National Environmental Research Program, ‘NERP Marine Biodiversity Hub’, <http://www.nerpmarine.edu.au/> viewed 23 May 2012.

[7]       Census of Marine Life, ‘About the census: a decade of discovery’, <http://www.coml.org/about-census> viewed 23 May 2012.

[8]       See Museum Victoria, ‘Museum Victoria’s field guide to Victorian fauna: now available on the app store’, <http://museumvictoria.com.au/discoverycentre/mv-field-guide-app/> viewed 23 May 2012.

[9]       OZCAM, ‘About OZCAM’, <http://www.ozcam.org.au/ozcam-data/> viewed 23 May 2012.

[10]     Museum Victoria, ‘Wild: amazing animals in a changing world’, <http://museumvictoria.com.au/melbournemuseum/discoverycentre/wild/> viewed 24 May 2012.

[11]     Reef Watch Victoria, ‘About Reef Watch’, <http://www.reefwatchvic.asn.au/AboutUs.htm> viewed 24 May 2012.

[12]     Reef Watch Victoria, ‘About Reef Watch’, <http://www.reefwatchvic.asn.au/AboutUs.htm> viewed 24 May 2012.

[13]     REDMAP, ‘What is Redmap?’, <http://www.redmap.org.au/about/What-is-redmap/> viewed 24 May 2012.

[14]     Dr Gretta Pecl, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, Transcript of evidence, 31 January 2012, pp. 18–19.

[15]     BirdLife Australia, ‘Birdata—The Atlas of Australian Birds’, <http://www.birdata.com.au/atlasstats.do> viewed 24 May 2012.

[16]     Birds Australia, ‘New action plan for Australian birds’, <http://www.birdsaustralia.com.au/homepage-news/new-action-plan-for-australian-birds.html> viewed 24 May 2012.

[17]     BirdLife Australia, Birds and climate change, briefing notes.

[18]     Mr Charlie Sherwin, BirdLife Australia, Transcript of evidence, 4 May 2012, p. 14.

[19]     Mr Sherwin, BirdLife Australia, Transcript of evidence, 4 May 2012, p. 14.

[20]     Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, ‘Migratory waterbirds’, <http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/migratory/waterbirds/index.html> viewed 19 October 2012.

[21]     Convention on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat. Ramsar (Iran), 2 February 1971. UN Treaty Series No. 14583. As amended by the Paris Protocol, 3 December 1982, and Regina Amendments, 28 May 1987.

[22]     Central Coastal Board, Improving our understanding of waterbirds in Western Port, CCB, Melbourne, August 2011, p. 2.

[23]     BirdLife Australia, Birds and climate change, briefing notes.

[24]     DB Lindenmayer, AR Northrop-Mackie, R Montague-Drake, M Crane, D Michael, S Okada and P Gibbons, ‘Not all kinds of revegetation are created equal: revegetation type influences bird assemblages in threatened Australian woodland ecosystems’, PLoS ONE, 7(4): e34527. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0034527, 2012, <http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0034527> viewed 8 September 2012.

[25]     Central Coastal Board, Improving our understanding of waterbirds in Western Port, CCB, Melbourne, August 2011.

[26]     Australasian Wader Studies Group, Dramatic declines of Australia’s migratory shorebirds—indicative data, BirdLife Australia, 2012.

[27]     The agreements are respectively known as the Japan–Australia Migratory Bird Agreement (JAMBA), the China–Australia Migratory Bird Agreement (CAMBA) and the Republic of Korea–Australia Migratory Bird Agreement (ROKAMBA).

Chapter 3 Water and biodiversity in South Australia

[1]       Government of South Australia, ‘Importance of water’, <http://www.sa.gov.au/subject/Water,+energy+and+environment/Water/Water+resources+in+SA/Importance+of+water> viewed 9 October 2012.

[2]       B Timbal, ‘The continuing decline in South-East Australian rainfall: update to May 2009’ in PA Sandery, T Leeuwenburg, G Wang and AJ Hollis (eds), CAWCR Research Letters, issue 2, July 2009, Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Melbourne, 2009, pp. 4–11, <http://www.cawcr.gov.au/publications/researchletters/CAWCR_Research_Letters_2.pdf> viewed 16 October 2012.

[3]       South Australian Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR), ‘Coorong, Lower Lakes and Murray Mouth region’, <http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/conservation/rivers_wetlands/coorong_lower_lakes_murray_mouth> viewed 16 October 2012.

[4]       G Dutson, S Garnett and C Gole, Australia’s Important Bird Areas: Key Sites for Bird Conservation, Birds Australia (RAOU) Conservation Statement No. 15, October 2009, pp. 32–3.

[5]       DEWNR, ‘Coorong, Lower Lakes and Murray Mouth region’, <http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/conservation/rivers_wetlands/coorong_lower_lakes_murray_mouth> viewed 16 October 2012.

[6]       Department for Environment and Heritage (DEH), Securing the future: a long-term plan for the Coorong, Lower Lakes and Murray Mouth, Government of South Australia, Adelaide, 2010.

[7]       On 1 July 2012, the South Australian Department of Environment and Natural Resources became the Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR). For consistency, the latter title is used throughout this report.

[8]       BirdLife Australia, ‘Birdata—Important Bird Area: Lakes Alexandrina & Albert’, <http://www.birdata.com.au/iba.vm> viewed 27 September 2012.

[9]       BirdLife Australia, ‘Birdata—Important Bird Area: Coorong’, <http://www.birdata.com.au/iba.vm> viewed 27 September 2012.

[10]     BirdLife Australia, ‘Birdata—Important Bird Area: Coorong’, <http://www.birdata.com.au/iba.vm> viewed 27 September 2012.

[11]     City of Salisbury, Salisbury city plan 2020: sustainable futures, City of Salisbury, Salisbury, South Australia, September 2008, p. 7.

[12]     This was an increase compared to previous years: 120 000 plants from approximately 15 species planted in 2010, and 240 000 plants from approximately 90 species planted in 2011.

[13]     DEWNR and NRA, KNYA taskforce report 2010–11, Government of South Australia, 2012, p. 8.

[14]     DEWNR, ‘Ngarrindjeri engagement’, <http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/Conservation/Rivers_wetlands/Coorong_Lower_Lakes_Murray_Mouth/Ngarrindjeri_engagement> viewed 4 October 2012.

[15]     DEWNR, ‘Lower Lakes and Coorong recovery plan’, <http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/Conservation/Rivers_wetlands/Coorong_Lower_Lakes_Murray_Mouth/Lower_Lakes_Coorong_recovery_plan> viewed 4 October 2012.

[16]     DEH, Securing the future: a long-term plan for the Coorong, Lower Lakes and Murray Mouth, Government of South Australia, Adelaide, 2010.

[17]     DEH, Securing the future: a long-term plan for the Coorong, Lower Lakes and Murray Mouth, Government of South Australia, Adelaide, 2010.

[18]     Senator the Hon. Don Farrell (Parliamentary Secretary for Sustainability and Urban Water) and Mr Nick Champion MP (Member for Wakefield), $42.5 million for stormwater and reuse projects, media release, Parliament House, Canberra, 8 August 2012.

Chapter 4 Kakadu, Northern Territory

[1]       Director of National Parks, Kakadu National Park: climate change strategy 2010–15, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra, 2010, p. 1.

[2]       Director of National Parks, Kakadu National Park management plan 2007–14, Australian Government, Darwin, 2007, p. 79.

[3]       Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries, ‘Buffalo—Primary Industry’, <http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Primary_Industry/index.cfm?newscat1=Other%20Animals&newscat2=&header=Buffalo> viewed 16 October 2012.

[4]       Northern Territory Government, ‘Olive hymenachne (Hymenachne amplexicaulis)’, <http://www.nretas.nt.gov.au/natural-resource-management/weeds/find/?a=13313> viewed 21 October 2012.

[5]       Department of Primary Industry, Fisheries and Mines, Management of mission grass, Agnote, no. F38, Northern Territory Government, Darwin, 27 June 2006; MM Douglas, SE Bunn, RJW Pidgeon, PM Davies, P Barrow, RA O’Connor and M Winning, Weed management and the biodiversity and ecological processes of tropical wetlands: draft final report, National Wetlands R&D Program, Environment Australia, and Land and Water Australia, 2001.

[6]       Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPAC), ‘Kakadu National Park—Six seasons of Kakadu’, <http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/kakadu/nature/seasons.html> viewed 25 October 2012.

[7]       DSEWPAC, ‘Kakadu National Park—Six seasons of Kakadu’, <http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/kakadu/nature/seasons.html> viewed 25 October 2012.

[8]       Kakadu Board of Management, A shared vision for tourism in Kakadu National Park, Australian Government and Northern Territory Government, 2005, p. 3.

[9]       Kakadu Board of Management, A shared vision for tourism in Kakadu National Park, Australian Government and Northern Territory Government, 2005, p. 3.

[10]     Gagudju Dreaming, ‘The spirit of Kakadu: Gagudju Dreaming—Overview’, <http://www.gagudju-dreaming.com/About-Us/Overview.aspx> viewed 22 October 2012.

[11]     Gagudju Dreaming, ‘The spirit of Kakadu: Gagudju Dreaming—Indigenous experience’, <http://www.gagudju-dreaming.com/Indigenous-Experience/Overview.aspx> viewed 22 October 2012.

[12]     Gagudju Dreaming, ‘The spirit of Kakadu: Gagudju Dreaming—Indigenous experience’, <http://www.gagudju-dreaming.com/Indigenous-Experience/Overview.aspx> viewed 22 October 2012.

[13]     DSEWPAC, ‘National Environmental Research Program: research hubs’, <http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/science/nerp/hubs.html> viewed 20 October 2012.

Chapter 5 Tropical North Queensland

[1]       The Marine Park makes up over 99 per cent of the World Heritage Area. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), ‘Great Barrier Reef outlook report 2009’, Exhibit 23 to Submission 28, pp. 3, 135.

[2]       GBRMPA, Submission 28, p. [1].

[3]       GBRMPA, ‘Great Barrier Reef outlook report 2009’, Exhibit 23 to Submission 28, p. 172.

[4]       United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), ‘Wet Tropics of Queensland’, <http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/486> viewed 31 July 2012.

[5]       Wet Tropics Management Authority (WTMA), Submission 2, p. 1.

[6]       UNESCO, ‘Wet tropics of Queensland’, <http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/486> viewed 31 July 2012.

[7]       WTMA, ‘Climate change in the wet tropics—Impacts and responses: state of the wet tropics report 2007‑08’, Exhibit 3 to Submission 2, p. 10; WTMA, Submission 2, pp. 5‑6.

[8]       R Garnaut, The Garnaut climate change review: final report, Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, 2008, p. 142.

[9]       GBRMPA was established in 1975 as a federal government statutory authority responsible for managing and protecting the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

[10]     C Reid, J Marshall, D Logan and D Kleine, Coral reefs and climate change, CoralWatch, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, 2009, p. 83.

[11]     WTMA, Submission 2, p. 1.

[12]     House of Representatives Standing Committee on Climate Change, Environment and the Arts (CCEA Committee), Case studies on biodiversity conservation: volume 1, May 2012, pp. 11‑12, 58. There is controversy surrounding the correct scientific classification for myrtle rust in Australia, therefore only the common name has been included.

[13]     See figure 5.1 above, p. 56.

[14]     Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF), ‘National eradication programs—Exotic weeds’, <http://www.daff.gov.au/animal-plant-health/pests-diseases-weeds/weeds/eradication> viewed 24 October 2012.

[15]     CCEA Committee, Case studies on biodiversity conservation: volume 1, May 2012, p. 38.

[16]     CCEA Committee, Case studies on biodiversity conservation: volume 1, May 2012, pp. 58‑9.

[17]     Mr Andrew Maclean, WTMA, Transcript of evidence, 5 July 2012, p. 27; CCEA Committee, Case studies on biodiversity conservation: volume 1, May 2012, pp. 58‑9.

[18]     See DAFF, Submission 73, pp. 2, 9, which lists: Australia’s Biodiversity Conservation Strategy 2010‑30; Caring for Our Country; the Clean Energy Futures Package; Australian Weeds Strategy; and the Australian Pest Animal Strategy as examples.

[19]     See, for example, Natural Resource Management Ministerial Council 2010, Australia’s biodiversity conservation strategy 2010‑30, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, Canberra, p. 46.

[20]     CCEA Committee, Case studies on biodiversity conservation: volume 1, May 2012, p. 58.

[21]     C Reid, J Marshall, D Logan and D Kleine, Coral reefs and climate change, CoralWatch, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, 2009, p. 68.

[22]     Dr S Ward, Submission 63, p. [4].

[23]     AIMS, ‘Declining coral growth on the Great Barrier Reef’, <http://www.aims.gov.au/docs/research/climate-change/declining-coral-growth.html> viewed 7 August 2012, citing G De’ath, J Lough and K Fabricius, ‘Declining coral calcification on the Great Barrier Reef’, Science, vol. 323, 2009.

[24]     Dr S Goosem, ‘Port Douglas to Daintree Rainforest Observatory’, trip notes, July 2012, pp. 3, 5.

[25]     Reef HQ, ‘Energy management’, <http://www.reefhq.com.au/education-at-reef-hq-aquarium/reef-research-and-internships/energy-management> viewed 8 August 2012.

[26]     See figure 5.1 above, p. 56.

[27]     GBRMPA, Annual report 2010‑11, GBRMPA, Townsville, 2011, p. 72.

[28]     GBRMPA, Annual report 2010‑11, GBRMPA, Townsville, 2011, p. 72.

[29]     WTMA, Annual report and state of the wet tropics report 2010‑2011, WTMA, Cairns, 2011, p. 60.

[30]     JCU, ‘Current research—JCU’, <http://www.jcu.edu.au/canopycrane/informationfor/JCUPRD_047095.html> viewed 7 August 2012.

[31]     JCU, ‘Current research—JCU’, <http://www.jcu.edu.au/canopycrane/informationfor/JCUPRD_047095.html> viewed 7 August 2012.

[32]     JCU, ‘Researchers—JCU’, <http://www.jcu.edu.au/canopycrane/informationfor/JCUPRD_046932.html> viewed 7 August 2012.

[33]     GBRMPA, Annual report 2010‑11, GBRMPA, Townsville, 2011, p. 72.

[34]     GBRMPA, Annual report 2010‑11, GBRMPA, Townsville, 2011, p. 73.

[35]     GBRMPA, Annual report 2010‑11, GBRMPA, Townsville, 2011, p. 71.

[36]     GBRMPA, ‘Great Barrier Reef outlook report 2009’, Exhibit 23 to Submission 28, p. 126.

[37]     GBRMPA, ‘Great Barrier Reef outlook report 2009’, Exhibit 23 to Submission 28, p. 126.

[38]     GBRMPA, ‘Reef Guardians’, <http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/our-partners/reef-guardians> viewed 6 August 2012; GBRMPA, ‘Great Barrier Reef outlook report 2009’, Exhibit 23 to Submission 28, p. 103.

[39]     Mr Maclean, WTMA, Transcript of evidence, 5 July 2012, p. 29.

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