Second reading amendments

The second reading debate is a policy debate relating to the principles of a particular bill. A senator may speak for up to 20 minutes and make a further contribution if a second reading amendment is moved. The second reading debate is opened by a minister who outlines the policies of the bill, and is usually closed by a minister who may respond to issues raised during the debate. The debate culminates in a vote signifying that the bill is agreed to, or rejected, in principle.

Second reading amendments do not affect the text of a bill. The amendment is moved to the motion for the second reading ("That this bill be now read a second time"), and is generally used to express an opinion about the bill or related policy issues; to propose the reference of the bill or related matters to a committee; or to delay further consideration of the bill. In some circumstances the effect of the amendment, if agreed to, is to defeat the bill.

2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014

Consolidated statistics

1991 - 2000 | 2001 - 2010 | 2011 - 2020

Related links

Brief Guide to Senate Procedure No. 16 - Consideration of Legislation

Senate Brief No. 8- The Senate and Legislation

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