Online exhibitions

'Making Laws' Exhibition

Making Laws - Online Exhibition

From gun control measures introduced in the wake of the Port Arthur shootings to legislation authorising financial assistance to disaster-affected regions, the Parliament makes laws in response to national events, issues and needs. How are these laws made and how can the community's voice be heard? This exhibition, currently on display in Parliament House, documents the important law-making work of the Australian Parliament.

Women in Federal Parliament

Women in Federal Parliament

I am well aware that, as I acquit myself in the work that I have undertaken for the next three years, so shall I either prejudice or enhance the prospects of those women who may wish to follow me in public service in the years to come.

So spoke Dame Edith Lyons, first female member of the House of Representatives, in her first speech to the House in 1943. And follow her they did. This display celebrates all women who have served in the federal parliament.

For Peace, Order and Good Government - The first Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

For Peace, Order and Good Government - Exhibition

The Australian Parliament which met for the first time in May 1901 was the most democratic in the world. The members of the first Parliament were a remarkable group of individuals, fired with a sense of destiny. In three years of hard work they laid the legislative foundation of the nation.

This exhibition tells the story of our first federal Parliament: its origins, who its members were, how it worked, and its achievements.

Magna Carta

Inspeximus issue of Magna Carta, 1297, Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra, ACT

What has a water-stained 700 year old manuscript in medieval Latin got to do with you? Trial by jury, rule by law, representative democracy, no taxation without representation and an end to the absolute power of kings. Big ideas have flowed from one small page.

View Magna Carta up close, read a full English translation and learn about its history and influence on parliament and the law. 

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