Department of Parliamentary Services Annual Report 2011-2012

Part 3 Report on performance



Program 5—Parliament House works

Administered items

Program 5 of the DPS Outcome and Programs Framework is the preservation of the heritage value of Parliament House and surrounds, including the building, furniture, artworks and the landscape and gardens.

DPS uses administered funds to plan, develop and deliver:

The structure of Parliament House was designed to have a life of 200 years. After 24 years of operation, further investment in a building works program is required, including:

Details of the department’s performance against measures relating to design integrity and engineering systems can be found under Program 3–Infrastructure services.

Performance

DPS ran 24 building work projects in 2011–12. Table 3.22 shows performance measures for building projects administered by DPS.

Table 3.22—Administered items—Building works—quality, quantity and price indicators

Quality indicator

Measure

Performance

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

Extent to which building projects meet objectives

Client acknowledgement that a project has delivered 90% of agreed business objectives (target: 100% of projects)

100%

100%

100%

Quantity indicator

Extent to which building projects are completed on time

Projects are delivered to agreed timetables (target: 100% of projects)

95%

88%

87%

Price indicator

Extent to which building projects are completed on budget

Projects are completed within approved total budget (target: 100%)

100%

100%

100%

Extent to which administered funds are expended on building projects

Cost of building projects

$15,547,000

$19,758,532

$34,473,846

Quality, Quantity and Price Indicators

During 2011–12, 24 projects were completed and met business objectives, all within their allocated budgets and 21 of them within their agreed timeframes. In addition to this, three projects that span several years completed major stages during 2011–12, also within their agreed timeframes and allocated budgets.

Table 3.23 shows performance measures for the Parliament House Art Collection (PHAC).

Extent to which the Art Collection is developed

Sixty-six new artworks were purchased for the PHAC in 2011–12. The focus continued to be on addressing areas of under-representation in the collection, including work by women artists, and work by Western Australia- and Queensland-based artists. A number of artworks depicting regional and remote areas of Australia were purchased. Among the more significant acquisitions was a painting by Queensland-based Indigenous artist Judy Watson, created in response to the 2011 Brisbane floods.

One new artwork gift was accepted into the collection—a painting by Western Australian artist Phillip Cook.

Table 3.23—Administered items—Artworks—quality, quantity and price indicators

Quality indicator

Measure

Performance

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

Extent to which the Art Collection is developed

Acquisition proposals approved by Art Advisory Committee (target: 100%)

98.3%

96.4%

100%

Quantity indicator

Extent to which the Art Collection is developed

Number of new artworks acquired

91

84

66

Extent to which the Art Collection is conserved

Number of artworks receiving preservation

9

30

7

Extent to which art projects are completed on time

Projects are delivered to agreed timetables (target: 100% of projects)

100%

100%

100%

Price indicator

Extent to which administered funds are expended on the Art Collection

Cost of artworks preservation

$75,986

$45,35011

$50,794

Cost of art collection development

$346,149

$324,01012

$300,709

Extent to which the Art Collection is conserved

Three major artwork conservation tasks were undertaken in 2011–12. They included: assessment and treatment of the large ceramic frieze River Odyssey, by Michael Ramsden and Graham Oldroyd, which is located in (and gives its name to) the Mural Hall at Parliament House; detailed analysis of the Forecourt mosaic designed by Michael Nelson Jagamara; and cleaning and repair of the two Chinese ‘Lion Dogs’ located in the House of Representatives formal gardens. A number of other minor conservation tasks were also completed. The planned second stage of the conservation of the Great Hall tapestry was delayed, while further investigation work was undertaken to determine the best method for accessing the work, and will continue in 2012–13.

Extent to which administered funds are expended on the Art Collection

Costs attributed to development and conservation of the Art Collection include the purchase price of artworks, as well as payments for delivery, custom framing, art consultancy services and contracted specialist conservation services.


 

11. This figure was incorrectly reported as $45,530 in the 2010–11 Annual Report.
12. This figure was incorrectly reported as $323,830 in the 2010–11 Annual Report.



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